JeanK

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About JeanK

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  1. Andrew Hill

    I think Andrew Hill's that kind of artist. All of a sudden you just get him, and from then on you realise what an incredible body of work he created. Like sidewinder I was at his amazing concert at the QEH. You can hear some extracts on Andrew's official site: http://www.andrewhilljazz.com/mp3.html There are very few duds but my choices would be: Black Fire, Smokestack, Judgment, Point of Departure, Dialogue (Bobby Hutcherson), Compulsion!!!!!, Passing Ships, Pax, Nefertiti, and three solo records - From California with Love, Verona Rag and Les Trinitaires. There's a good survey of some of Hill's best work by pianist Vijay Iyer at: http://www.jazz.com/dozens/iyer-selects-hill and (if you can find it) the April 2008 issue of Jazz Review - a now defunct UK jazz mag - had an excellent survey article of his records.
  2. Joe Farrell

    'Outback' is my favorite, along with Andrew Hill's 'Passing Ships'. Also love the cover of Stevie W's 'Too High' on 'Penny Arcade' - funky as hell with some tremendous playing from Herbie as well.
  3. Steve Lacy

    JJ Avenel is one of the most amazing bassists on the planet. I'm not sure how widely this is recognized, though. I am beginning to think that if a musician stays with one band for a long time (John Gilmore, Jimmy Lyons etc) that the downside is that they don't the recognition they deserve.
  4. Steve Lacy

    Wow - I've got a pretty good Lacy collection, but you've got a few that I don't have. I've been trying to track down a copy of Follies for a while. The 70s are not my favorite decade for Lacy - he himself called some of his music from that era "scratchy" - but I think that two you mention, The Crust and Raps, are among his best from the period. Yes - very rarely see Follies around. It was never reissued on CD as far as I can see. All this Lacy talk has set me off on a listening binge. It is wonderful to have so much of his work recorded! I've also really been picking up on Jean-Jacques Avenel's excellent bass playing - particularly from the late 80's onwards. I had the great pleasure of having dinner with Steve and UK improviser Steve Beresford in 1978 in Berlin. He was totally charming, hugely intelligent and very funny. I wish I could remember more of our conversation although I do remember talking about poetry as well as music - Jack Spicer and Jerome Rothenberg's Technicians of the Scared collection. We were all transfixed at one stage by the German family on the next table who worked their way through four whole roast chickens....
  5. Steve Lacy

    I've really enjoyed reading this old thread, and have spent several hours digging into a very large pile of Lacy records. A few that have not been mentioned very much or at all. Steve Lacy Quintet - Follies (SAJ 18) Recorded live in Berlin in 1977. Slightly brittle recording but very fine performance. 'Esteem' is outstanding with one of my favourite Steve Potts solos. The Crust on Emanem is Lacy, Potts and Kent Carter with Derek Bailey and John Stevens is very good and the notes reveal that the song 'Flakes' is an "ice-skating piece for Mark Rothko" Lumps on ICP with Maarten Altena, Han Bennink and Michel Waisvisz on electronics. The quackiest version of 'The New Duck" ever. Raps on Adelphi Jazz Line. A quartet with Potts, Johnson and a bass player called Ron Miller who I know nothing about. Recorded in NYC in 1977 and well produced by Michael Cuscuna. A very powerful record. The notes describe Oliver Johnson's playing as "nothing short of explosive" and I have to agree. A few nice 70s solo albums: Solo on Emanem from 1972, Stabs on SAJ from 1975, Crops on Quark from 1976 (reissued as Hooky), and Clinkers on Hat Art from 1977. It's very hard to pick my favourite Lacy records but they would probably be: NY Capers, The Way, Sortie, School Days, Raps, Evidence, The Door, Prospectus, Bye-Ya, Catch, and Sands. And then there's all those great records with Mal Waldron.....
  6. Arthur Blythe - In The Tradition (w/ Stanley Cowell, Fred Hopkins, Steve McCall) [Columbia, US] Stan Tracey Octet - The Bracknell Connection [steam, UK] Duke Ellington - Liberian Suite & A Tone Parallel to Harlem [CBS, France mono]