montg

Members
  • Content count

    1,261
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by montg

  1. Best Jazz Albums of 2007

    Good call, I always enjoy DT's reviews on the bagatellen site. Thanks for the link.
  2. Best Jazz Albums of 2007

    Here are a lot more top ten lists from 2007 from jazz 'critics' jazz journalists association top ten 2007 I tend to agree with elder don's sentiments--to the extent i can parse them; understanding is, after all, part of the adventure. Tthe Slate list is a pretty bland one to me. It is, for the most part, the 'top ten corporate sponsored' jazz recordings of 2007. Or 'the top 10 jazz recordings reflecting and/or contributing to the gentrification of jazz'. Unfortunately, I have no alternatives to offer. If there's something new and underground that's really worthy of acclaim, I'd love to know what it is.
  3. Fred katz

    I'm wondering what people think about Katz' Folk songs for far out folks? Sounds interesting. The 1959 lost classic, Folk Songs for Far Out Folk by Jazz Innovator, Fred Katz, the gentleman who wrote the original score to Little Shop of Horrors, brought the cello to the forefront of the jazz repertoire as part of the legendary Chico Hamilton Quintet, and gave the world the ever-popular Sidney Poitier Reads Plato. Katz believed that jazz was born from "the roots of the people." The roots he explores here are American, Hebrew, and African folk songs, all reinterpreted by Katz for jazz orchestras. The Hebrew folk songs speak to Katz's own roots as the Brooklyn-born son of a kabbalist and communist dentist. Katz is joined by the legendary likes of saxophonist Paul Horn, flutist Buddy Collette, and pianist John Williams (years before he composed the score to Star Wars). (from the website rebootstereophonic ) Any other Katz recommendations? npr feature today on Katz npr fred katz
  4. Rudresh Mahanthappa

    Rudresh Mahanthappa has a pretty distinctive voice, an exception to the sound-alike players the music schools take pride in producing. I've grown to really like his playing on Reimagining, I've been meaning to explore some more, thanks for bringing up this thread. According to his website he has a new cd due out in Fall 2008. rudresh
  5. Radio

    Here's a fairly typical hour of 'jazz' programing from my local public radio station. I assume it's consultant-driven and serves very well whatever purposes the consultants are attempting to achieve. But from my standpoint, it also exemplifies the compromise of public radio's identity that the corporate mentality invites. Nothing against any music on that list, per se. But the suits love vocals and piano trios and romantic sax quartets, and have pretty much squeezed pre 50s jazz, inside/outside jazz, and so many other forms of the music right off of the public airwaves. 9:00 Blackbird Ken Karsh Ventana 09:06 Thinking Of You Houston Person Thinking Of You 09:11 It's Only A Paper Moon Ray Brown Bassics 09:19 Hot Christmas Squirrel Nut Zippers Christmas Caravan 09:22 I'll Be Your Baby Tonig Curtis Stigers Real Emotional 09:28 Our Love Is Here To Sta Louis Armstr/Ella Fitzger An American Icon 09:33 Half Step Bill Charlap Souvenir 09:39 He Ain't Got Ryhthm Champian Fulton With David Berger & the 09:43 The Way You Look Tonigh Erroll Garner Body & Soul
  6. Worst Mosaic Decision?

    I'd be very,very happy if the bolded got reissued! The McCann and others idea sounds interesting--I'd spring for it.
  7. My listening has sort of honed in lately on jazz guitar. I'm wondering how people feel about the relative merits of these three sets, I'm thinking of choosing one to purchase some time this spring.
  8. Farlow,Pass, Smith

    The Farlow is one of the most enjoyable of the Mosaics for me. I wasn't much of a jazz guitar fan until listening to Farlow. He has what is, for me, one of the essential qualities of jazz--the ability to humanize the instrument. Not an easy thing to do, I'm sure, on any insturment, but particularly the guitar. But somehow he has a sound and approach that is distinct--and man, can Farlow and Eddie Costa fly!
  9. Fred katz

    It was recently released on cd, which is pretty remarkable considering the shrinking cd market! katz at amazon BB, thank you for the overview. I've been only able to hear excerpts so far, and a couple of selections on the npr site--it reminds me a little of the Duane Tatro CD Jazz for Moderns, which I enjoy a lot.
  10. Help me choose my next Ellington purchase

    Features the utterly fabulous and stupendous The Sleeping Lady and the Giant Who Watches Over Her. i second the 'utterly fabulous' and 'stupendous' adjectives for this piece. This is a great album
  11. Radio

    I grew up in the 70s listening to radio all the time. I love radio. I used to turn the am radio on late at night when I was a kid and turn the dial to get all sorts of interesting radio stations, across the Midwest, Southeast, and Canada on good nights for receptions. It saddens me to see what has become of radio today. Your quote above perfectly sums up the jazz programming on my local public radio station. It's so boring and bland, and at times marginally jazz with all the vocalists, I don't listen to it anymore, it just frustrates me. I can't see how any kid curious about jazz would be anything but turned off to the music if he/she turned to public radio to become initiated. I have satellite radio, where the programming is better--at least I have a chance to hear someone like Tina Brooks--although the satellite station is still somewhat limited, particularly in missing out on newer jazz artists. I listen to internet streams, mostly those produced by board members, and, increasingly, as my own library continues to get downloaded on my itunes, I'm becoming my own radio programmer (for better and for worse, I guess).
  12. Bleak days ahead

    Next year may be the year the major labels died--or at least abandoned the music bidness. Hopefully, the vaults will open to some specialty companies like Mosaic as the majors give up the their vain, greedy fight.
  13. Some newer releases I picked this year and enjoyed (most were not released in 2007, I usually lag behind) Dave Douglas --Meaning and Mystery Maria Schneider--Concert in the Garden Ari Brown--Live at the Green Mill Charles Lloyd--Hyperion with Higgins Oliver Lake--Talkin' Stick Ben Allison-Cowboy Justice Reissues I picked up in 2007 that really stand out for me (I've been catching up with a lot of Conns) Booker Ervin --Tex Book Tenor Sam Rivers --Countours My best purchase this year, at least reissue-wise, was the Tal Farlow Mosaic. For consistency and all-around excellence, this one is hard to top:
  14. funk without a bass..interesting. I've read nothing but positives about this cd, i prolly should check it out.
  15. i kind of object to the caricatures that get drawn sometimes--when I listen to music my ear seems to invariably drift to the bass line & if there's a funk groove riff or whatever that repeats over and over-that might be great on the dance floor, but I can't listen to it without starting to pull my hair and go bug eyed so music that features the verities of swing, or some interesting rhythmic action that marginally approaches swing, is what i enjoy to listen to. It moves me, that doesn't make me (or the music) necessarily reactionary. i like jazz i don't like fusion funk jazz or whatever it is. fwiw, i generally like Potter's playing as a sideman w/Dave Douglas, David Binney, Dave Holland, and Adam Rogers, but i haven't heard this new cd so i'm not commenting on it per se.
  16. I have a ver early cd incarnation of this titled 'accent on trombone'--I think it's from fresh sounds..hard to tell, the cd was manufactured in Switzerland, but all of the notes are written in Spanish. No identification of 'fresh sounds' on the cd booklet or case. Whatever the case, beautiful music but lousy remastering (assuming there was any), with Milt Hinton's bass sounding like mud.
  17. What music did you buy today?

    Charles Lloyd--Lift Every Voice And some Blue Notes Grant Green--Talkin' About (the combination of Green with Larry Young is one of my favorites) Hutcherson--The Kicker Mclean--Right Now!
  18. What music did you buy today?

    That first session on the Clifford Jordan (w/Kenny Dorham) is outstanding. And very well-recorded to boot.
  19. Charles Lloyd Corner

    I don't think it's Lloyd's best for ECM, but if you like the other ECMs you'll probably like this one. Some great stuff on here -- "Blood Count", the Silvio Rodriguez tunes, "Amazing Grace", the flute tune on the second disc. Parts of the second disc ramble. Guy Just received this. I haven't gotten to the second disc yet, but I'm really lovin' what I'm hearing on the first one. I'm not a particularly big fan of the ECM stuff in general, but something about the LLoyd/Abercrombie combination speaks to me in just the right spot.
  20. Stanley Turrentine

    I was at Three Rivers Stadium the day Clemente got his 3,000th hit. Growing up in the Pittsburgh area in the 70s, I was amazed many years later, after becoming a jazz fan, how many great jazz artists were from Pittsburgh..the only Pittsburgh musician I ever heard about while growing up was donnie iris, blue collar rock, if you know what I mean. Anyway I say all that to say this: Turrentine's tone just knocks me out, and it somehow manages to take me back to those Pittsburgh days of my childhood. His sax tone is Soulful and Deep, (those words don't really describe it well, but that's the best I can do). I think Jubilee Shout (on the Mosaic set) is my favorite Turrentine session.
  21. actually, I just ordered it. Chuck's right, if I like Andrew Hill, it's kind of self-evident
  22. 'self-recommending' is a good term--I enjoy Hill's music ( I have many of the Blue Notes, including the last one) and I imagine I'll like this a lot; I guess I was just wondering if, over time, this set holds up with the body of Hill's work or if it is viewed as more of a curio
  23. up. i'm thinking about getting this, and I'm wondering, now that many board members have lived with this set for a year or two, how it has held up.
  24. Concord Music Group Sale

    OJC Limited Editions are 10.98, as are any remaining K2's (good luck with those). SACDs are 13.98. As far as the Hybrid SACDs go, I can heartily recommend the following: Cal Tjader with Stan Getz Gettin' Together - Art Pepper Art Pepper Plus Eleven (probably the best-sounding of the bunch, and that's saying a lot!) Happy shopping! the zoot sims gershwin sacd hybrid is really good-sounding too. not to mention great music!