The Jazz Aficionado

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  1. Sonny Rollins Trio & Horace Silver Quintet - Zurich 1959

    Sonny is not so happy about this release! The Great African-American Classical Art-Form Sonny Rollins Trio / Horace Silver Quintet /Swiss Radio Days, Vol. 40: Zurich 1959 http://ow.ly/irc0308aVp8 **Note from Sonny Rollins. Quote, "While this recording is indeed legal under Swiss law, to release a broadcast such as this after the 50-year copyright period has expired, without any payment or even notification to the artists involved, is unfair. Although this may be a 'legal' release according to Swiss law, it remains, in my view, illegal and completely unauthorized. I never entered into any agreement at any time with these people or with anyone for a recording to be made of our performance or for it to be released." On Thursday, March 5, 1959, the Sonny Rollins Trio and the Horace Silver Quintet were in Zurich on a joint European tour. Interestingly, Sonny and Silver were at different points in their careers. Silver had yet to crest and would record the fiery Blowin' the Blues Away in August before riding his funk piano style into the 1960s. Sonny, by contrast, had grown frustrated with his approach on the tenor saxophonist. He feared he was growing too conventional and staid at a time when other saxophonists such as John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman were on the cusp of a more spiritual and freer jazz form. [Silver and Sonny Rollins in 1959] When Sonny returned to the States later that spring, he began a sabbatical in the summer that would last until late 1961. During that time, he could be found practicing tirelessly on New York's Williamsburg Bridge, finding solace and energy in the air and sky. While jazz fans would later find Sonny's mid-river retreat romantic, Sonny viewed it as a necessary and grueling pursuit, akin to an athlete attempting to develop a new level of endurance superior to that of rival players. In fact, three days before Sonny arrived in Zurich with Silver, Miles Davis had recorded three tracks for Kind of Blue—Freddie the Freeloader, So What and Blue in Green. While Sonny could not have known what was recorded at Columbia's 30th Street Studio, Kind of Blue's release in August surely was another modernist straw that convinced Sonny an artistic hiatus was necessary. Silver, by contrast, who relied much less on songbook standards than Sonny and more on his own steady stream of hard-bop originals, was on a roll. That March, the two groups were together in Zurich, with Silver opening for Sonny. At some point during the 5th, the groups wound up at a radio station to use the studios. It's unclear whether this was to record or to rehearse for an upcoming concert. Fortunately, someone flipped on the tape recorder, and their sets were captured. The result was The Sonny Rollins Trio & Horace Silver Quintet: Zurich 1959, part of the Swiss Radio Days Jazz Series. This album is now available on CD thanks to the TCB label. Sonny's set opens with I Remember You and is followed by I've Told Every Little Star, It Could Happen to You, Oleo and Will You Still Be Mine? What's fascinating here is that you can hear Sonny's frustration. While his tone is muscular and his runs on the tenor sax are fluid, he seems to be roaming around in search of himself and a groove. Joining him were Henry Grimes on bass and Pete La Roca on drums. Listening to The Bridge, his first album in early 1962 following his self-imposed exile, you hear remarkable contrasts. After his break, you hear a freer attack on Sonny's part and a new level of control and originality. Silver's set is refreshing and strong. His quintet in 1959 featured trumpeter Blue Mitchell, tenor saxophonist Junior Cook, bassist Gene Taylor and drummer Louis Hayes. This was an extraordinary group on every level. They were tight, hip, lyrical and soulful. The tracks are Nica's Dream, Cool Eyes, Shirl (just the trio), Ecaroh and Senior Blues. Nica's Dream here marks the first time Silver recorded the original as a leader. The earlier version was for Columbia while Silver was a member of the Jazz Messengers in 1956. Perhaps the album's high points are Ecaroh, taken at a faster tempo than the earlier version, and Shirl, a ballad with the horns out. It tops Silver's earlier version in 1956 on 6 Pieces of Silver and is a reminder how sensual and moody Silver could be on original piano ballads. Shirl is matched only by Lonely Woman from Song From My Father (1964). The CD's fidelity is crystal clear and provides us with what can only be called two studio albums recorded abroad—one by Sonny Rollins, who was winding down his 1950s phase, and another by Horace Silver, who was just getting started. A breathtaking snapshot of two of jazz's greatest artists at turning points. Rashid Booker, The Jazz Aficionado Hey! Thanks for stopping by, please like our page and share the content. The Most Influential African-American Cultural Network in the Universe! thejazzaficionado@socialmediastrategiesglobal.net #NowPlaying #MilesDavis #AP #Sothebys #np #TuneIn #Music #Listen #ListenLive #Spotify #Radio #Art #Blues #ArtForm #Luxury #FineArt #RSI #Jazz #Piano #Vinyl #BeBop #HardBop #FreeJazz #PostBop #France #Video #NYC #Berlin #Paris #TheloniousSpereMonk — Keeping The Idiom Alive Rashid Booker Harlem USA 125th St
  2. Miles Davis Paris 1949

    http://ow.ly/jeu6305EdU3 @ ArtSalt, but Miles did not go to France until 1949, so the Google search was incorrect, I saw that post as well. @Big Beat Steve , I think that they were using the image for advertisement purposes.
  3. Archie Shepp - How John Coltrane Helped Me,

    The Great African-American Classical Art-Form Archie Shepp - How John Coltrane Helped Me, the veteran saxophonist, educator and activist discuss John Coltrane and Albert Ayler https://youtu.be/8rBHG0rvogQ?list=PLqCjLhOxHNnLzDFIHOc0F4E5oT-R-HR1c Negro music and culture are intrinsically improvisational, existential. Nothing is sacred. Archie Shepp – 1990 Archie Shepp was born in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on May 24th, 1937, but raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he studied piano, clarinet, and alto saxophone before focusing on tenor and soprano saxophone. He is best known for his passionately Afro-centric music of the late sixties which focused on highlighting the injustices faced by the African race, as well as for his work with the New York Contemporary Five and his collaborations with his “New Thing” contemporaries, most notably Cecil Taylor and John Coltrane. He studied dramatic literature at Goddard College, earning his degree in 1959. He played alto saxophone in dance bands and sought theatrical work in New York. He also produced plays, among them The Communist in 1965, and Lady Day: A Musical Tragedy in 1972 with trumpeter/composer Cal Massey. — Rashid Booker Keeping The Idiom Alive Harlem USA 125th St Hey! Thanks for stopping by, please like our page and share the content. The Most Influential African-American Cultural Network in the Universe! thejazzaficionado@socialmediastrategiesglobal.net #NowPlaying #MilesDavis #AP #Sothebys #np #TuneIn #Music #Listen #ListenLive #Spotify #Radio #Art #Blues #ArtForm #Luxury #FineArt #RSI #Jazz #Piano #Vinyl #BeBop #HardBop #FreeJazz #PostBop #France #Video #NYC #Berlin #Paris #TheloniousSpereMonk —
  4. Archie Shepp - How John Coltrane Helped Me,

    The Great African-American Classical Art-Form Archie Shepp - How John Coltrane Helped Me, the veteran saxophonist, educator and activist discuss John Coltrane and Albert Ayler https://youtu.be/8rBHG0rvogQ?list=PLqCjLhOxHNnLzDFIHOc0F4E5oT-R-HR1c Negro music and culture are intrinsically improvisational, existential. Nothing is sacred. Archie Shepp – 1990 Archie Shepp was born in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on May 24th, 1937, but raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he studied piano, clarinet, and alto saxophone before focusing on tenor and soprano saxophone. He is best known for his passionately Afro-centric music of the late sixties which focused on highlighting the injustices faced by the African race, as well as for his work with the New York Contemporary Five and his collaborations with his “New Thing” contemporaries, most notably Cecil Taylor and John Coltrane. He studied dramatic literature at Goddard College, earning his degree in 1959. He played alto saxophone in dance bands and sought theatrical work in New York. He also produced plays, among them The Communist in 1965, and Lady Day: A Musical Tragedy in 1972 with trumpeter/composer Cal Massey. — Rashid Booker Keeping The Idiom Alive Harlem USA 125th St Hey! Thanks for stopping by, please like our page and share the content. The Most Influential African-American Cultural Network in the Universe! thejazzaficionado@socialmediastrategiesglobal.net #NowPlaying #MilesDavis #AP #Sothebys #np #TuneIn #Music #Listen #ListenLive #Spotify #Radio #Art #Blues #ArtForm #Luxury #FineArt #RSI #Jazz #Piano #Vinyl #BeBop #HardBop #FreeJazz #PostBop #France #Video #NYC #Berlin #Paris #TheloniousSpereMonk —
  5. Archie Shepp - How John Coltrane Helped Me,

    The Great African-American Classical Art-Form Archie Shepp - How John Coltrane Helped Me, the veteran saxophonist, educator and activist discuss John Coltrane and Albert Ayler https://youtu.be/8rBHG0rvogQ?list=PLqCjLhOxHNnLzDFIHOc0F4E5oT-R-HR1c Negro music and culture are intrinsically improvisational, existential. Nothing is sacred. Archie Shepp – 1990 Archie Shepp was born in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on May 24th, 1937, but raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he studied piano, clarinet, and alto saxophone before focusing on tenor and soprano saxophone. He is best known for his passionately Afro-centric music of the late sixties which focused on highlighting the injustices faced by the African race, as well as for his work with the New York Contemporary Five and his collaborations with his “New Thing” contemporaries, most notably Cecil Taylor and John Coltrane. He studied dramatic literature at Goddard College, earning his degree in 1959. He played alto saxophone in dance bands and sought theatrical work in New York. He also produced plays, among them The Communist in 1965, and Lady Day: A Musical Tragedy in 1972 with trumpeter/composer Cal Massey. — Rashid Booker Keeping The Idiom Alive Harlem USA 125th St Hey! Thanks for stopping by, please like our page and share the content. The Most Influential African-American Cultural Network in the Universe! thejazzaficionado@socialmediastrategiesglobal.net #NowPlaying #MilesDavis #AP #Sothebys #np #TuneIn #Music #Listen #ListenLive #Spotify #Radio #Art #Blues #ArtForm #Luxury #FineArt #RSI #Jazz #Piano #Vinyl #BeBop #HardBop #FreeJazz #PostBop #France #Video #NYC #Berlin #Paris #TheloniousSpereMonk —
  6. Archie Shepp - How John Coltrane Helped Me,

    The Great African-American Classical Art-Form Archie Shepp - How John Coltrane Helped Me, the veteran saxophonist, educator and activist discuss John Coltrane and Albert Ayler https://youtu.be/8rBHG0rvogQ?list=PLqCjLhOxHNnLzDFIHOc0F4E5oT-R-HR1c Negro music and culture are intrinsically improvisational, existential. Nothing is sacred. Archie Shepp – 1990 Archie Shepp was born in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on May 24th, 1937, but raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he studied piano, clarinet, and alto saxophone before focusing on tenor and soprano saxophone. He is best known for his passionately Afro-centric music of the late sixties which focused on highlighting the injustices faced by the African race, as well as for his work with the New York Contemporary Five and his collaborations with his “New Thing” contemporaries, most notably Cecil Taylor and John Coltrane. He studied dramatic literature at Goddard College, earning his degree in 1959. He played alto saxophone in dance bands and sought theatrical work in New York. He also produced plays, among them The Communist in 1965, and Lady Day: A Musical Tragedy in 1972 with trumpeter/composer Cal Massey. — Rashid Booker Keeping The Idiom Alive Harlem USA 125th St Hey! Thanks for stopping by, please like our page and share the content. The Most Influential African-American Cultural Network in the Universe! thejazzaficionado@socialmediastrategiesglobal.net #NowPlaying #MilesDavis #AP #Sothebys #np #TuneIn #Music #Listen #ListenLive #Spotify #Radio #Art #Blues #ArtForm #Luxury #FineArt #RSI #Jazz #Piano #Vinyl #BeBop #HardBop #FreeJazz #PostBop #France #Video #NYC #Berlin #Paris #TheloniousSpereMonk —
  7. An interview with the great Jimmy Cobb

    The Great African-American Classical Art-Form An interview with the great Jimmy Cobb http://www.nightjourneyrewind.com/home/night-journey-rewind-with-drummer-jimmy-cobb The Great Jimmy Cobb's most famous work is on Miles Davis' Kind of Blue (1959), considered by many to be the quintessential jazz record. Cobb is the last surviving player from the session. Legendary jazz drummer, Jimmy Cobb, was born in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 1929. A superb, mostly self-taught musician, Jimmy is the elder statesman of all the incredible Miles Davis bands. Jimmy’s inspirational work with Miles, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderly and Co. spanned 1957 until 1963 and included the masterpiece "Kind of Blue", the most popular jazz recording in history. He also played on "Sketches of Spain", Someday My Prince will Come", "Live at Carnegie Hall, "Live at the Blackhawk", "Porgy and Bess", and many, many other watermarks Miles Davis recordings. At 87 Jimmy is still going strong teaching and performing. Set back and enjoy the journey with Jimmy Cobb. A special thanks go out to Rashid Booker for making it happen. Peace Keeping The Idiom Alive Rashid Booker Harlem USA 125th St
  8. An interview with the great Jimmy Cobb

    The Great African-American Classical Art-Form An interview with the great Jimmy Cobb http://www.nightjourneyrewind.com/home/night-journey-rewind-with-drummer-jimmy-cobb The Great Jimmy Cobb's most famous work is on Miles Davis' Kind of Blue (1959), considered by many to be the quintessential jazz record. Cobb is the last surviving player from the session. Legendary jazz drummer, Jimmy Cobb, was born in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 1929. A superb, mostly self-taught musician, Jimmy is the elder statesman of all the incredible Miles Davis bands. Jimmy’s inspirational work with Miles, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderly and Co. spanned 1957 until 1963 and included the masterpiece "Kind of Blue", the most popular jazz recording in history. He also played on "Sketches of Spain", Someday My Prince will Come", "Live at Carnegie Hall, "Live at the Blackhawk", "Porgy and Bess", and many, many other watermarks Miles Davis recordings. At 87 Jimmy is still going strong teaching and performing. Set back and enjoy the journey with Jimmy Cobb. A special thanks go out to Rashid Booker for making it happen. Peace Keeping The Idiom Alive Rashid Booker Harlem USA 125th St
  9. The Great African-American Classical Art-Form “THE SAVORY COLLECTION”, JAZZ’S GREATEST BURIED TREASURE OF NEVER-BEFORE-HEARD RECORDINGS IS BEING RELEASED FOR THE FIRST TIME EXCLUSIVELY ON APPLE MUSIC WITH PRE-ORDER BEGINNING ON SEPTEMBER 23 The National Jazz Museum in Harlem Presents The Savory Collection, Volume 1 - Body and Soul: Coleman Hawkins and Friends To Be Released October 14 (New York, NY) - The National Jazz Museum in Harlem has partnered with Apple Music to exclusively launch The Savory Collection, an extraordinary and unique historical archive featuring swing era jazz artists in their prime, performing inspired and extended performances of never-before-heard material, recorded in superior sound quality. Pre-order kicks off September 23 for the first volume entitled The National Jazz Museum in Harlem Presents The Savory Collection, Volume 1 - Body and Soul: Coleman Hawkins and Friends, featuring first grat track "Body and Soul," by Coleman Hawkins And His Orchestra, which just premiered in the NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/23/arts/music/savory-collection-apple-music-coleman-hawkins.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Farts&action=click&contentCollection=arts®ion=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=5&pgtype=sectionfront . The second grat track, Dinah," a Lionel Hampton Jam Session, will be available October 7. Pre order here: iTunes.com/SavoryCollection and AppleMusic.com/SavoryCollection The collection, which includes 18 stellar tracks recorded between 1936 and 1940 by such artists as Coleman Hawkins, Ella Fitzgerald, Fats Waller, Lionel Hampton, Carl Kress and Emilio Caceres, along with a foreword by noted historian/filmmaker Ken Burns, will be available at Apple Music and iTunes on October 14. It represents a new and significant piece of jazz’s great legacy, with performances by legendary artists from jazz’s golden era. These sounds have never been heard since they were originally broadcast decades ago. These masterpieces come through in brilliantly clear sound – there has never been an archival discovery with this combination of quality and quantity. Loren Schoenberg, Founding Director and Senior Scholar of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, who says this is a collector’s dream, relentlessly pursued these rumored performances for over 30 years. They were recorded off the air by sound engineer Bill Savory, a technical genius, musician and jazz fan. Schoenberg finally hit pay dirt through Savory’s son Eugene Desavouret, with the discovery of 975 discs and hundreds of hours of music that no one knew about, which the Museum immediately acquired with the goals of restoring the music and making it available to the public. This extraordinary find is comparable to buried treasure in the music world. It is an educational gem, an authentic record of our rich musical heritage and adds new layers to the story of jazz as we know it. Comments Schoenberg : “The Savory Collection is the story of a buried treasure. Imagine finding an unknown play of Shakespeare's or an unknown novel by Mark Twain – that's what this is! It’s is as close to a musical time capsule as you'll ever find - you are right there, in the moment, hearing never-before-heard sounds in truly remarkable fidelity.” The Savory Collection, Volume 1 - Body and Soul: Coleman Hawkins and Friends is a treasure trove of truly remarkable performances by some of the most respected names in jazz, captured in the late 1930’s during the height of the swing era. The extended nightclub and ballroom performances recorded by Savory from radio broadcasts were longer, free-flowing, creatively daring, yet relaxed, as the artists were freed from the limitations and time constraints of a conventional studio recording. Of particular note is Coleman Hawkins’ first live version of “Body and Soul,” clocking in at six minutes with a fresh, well-thought-out performance that is two times the length of the original studio recording, already considered a smash hit in the annals of jazz. It adds a whole new context to what we know about jazz. The superior sound of the tracks makes you feel as if you were in the room, with phenomenal pick up, due to Savory recording from in-studio lines coming directly from the radio networks on professional equipment. Savory also recorded on larger 12” - 16” discs on more durable material and often at the lower speed of 33 1/3, allowing him to record longer performances in their entirety, jam sessions, stretched-out play, and extended solos. He always selected the best performances, understanding their historical value. The caliber of these recordings could never be duplicated in studio. Doug Pomeroy, a Grammy Award-winning audio restoration specialist was brought out of retirement to restore and master the material so that it could be digitally transferred and preserved for generations to come. Pomeroy’s work set up a seamless transition in bridging the past with the digital future. The project was produced by Loren Schoenberg & Ken Druker. Jonathan Scheuer and Daryl Libow serve as executive producers. The Savory Collection, Vol. 2 is expected to be released later this year featuring rare tracks from Count Basie’s band with saxophonist Lester Young that have not been heard since their broadcast in the late 1930’s. Subsequent volumes will follow in 2017. Featuring A Foreword by Noted Historian/Filmmaker Ken Burns. The National Jazz Museum in Harlem selected Apple Music as its exclusive partner because of the brand’s progressive and innovative company culture and consistent advocacy of the creative arts. Apple Music represents artistic diversity in supporting all genres of music and has always offered music fans the best of all possible options. Apple Music is the best choice for a jazz or music fan. TRACK LISTING: COLEMAN HAWKINS AND HIS ORCHESTRA May 17, 1940 Body and Soul Basin Street Blues Lazy Butterfly (Theme) ELLA FITZGERALD August 13, 1938 A-Tisket, A-Tasket I’ve Been Saving Myself for You FATS WALLER AND HIS RHYTHM October 22, 1938 Medley: Yacht Club Swing / Hold My Hand I Haven't Changed a Thing Medley: Summer Souvenirs/Who Blew Out the Flame Medley: You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby / Sixty Seconds Got Together / I’ve Got a Pocketful of Dreams Alligator Crawl Spider and The Fly LIONEL HAMPTON JAM SESSION December 28, 1938 Dinah Blues Chinatown, My Chinatown Stardust Rosetta CARL KRESS March 29, 1936 Heat Wave EMILIO CACERES TRIO October 19, 1937 China Boy The National Jazz Museum in Harlem, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a 501(c)3 charitable organization. It is a thriving center for jazz that stimulates hearts and minds, and reaches out to diverse audiences to enjoy this quintessential American music. The idea for the Museum originated in 1997 with Leonard Garment, Counsel to two U.S. Presidents, and an accomplished jazz saxophonist. Board member Abraham D. Sofaer, a former U.S. District Judge, gave an initial gift in honor of his brother-in-law Richard J. Scheuer, Jr. A congressional appropriation in 2000 and funds from the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone have also been critical to sustaining the Museum. The Museum’s mission is to preserve, promote and present jazz by inspiring knowledge, appreciation and the celebration of jazz locally, nationally and internationally. Jonathan Batiste and Christian McBride are Co-Artistic Directors of the Museum, which is currently located in the heart of Harlem at 58 West 129th St. For more information, please visit www.jazzmuseuminharlem.org. Contact: Karen Sundell 310/854-8167 ksundell@rogersandcowan.com Lori Lousararian-Hakola 310/351-0110 llousararian@rogersandcowan.com KAREN SUNDELL / VP Music – Entertainment 8687 Melrose Avenue|7th Floor |Los Angeles, CA 90069 T: 310.854.8167 | C: 310.738.6564 — with Rashid Booker in New York, New York. Hey! Thanks for stopping by, please like our page and share the content. The Most Influential African-American Cultural Network in the Universe! thejazzaficionado@socialmediastrategiesglobal.net #NowPlaying #MilesDavis #AP #Sothebys #np #TuneIn #Music #Listen #ListenLive #Spotify#Radio #Art #Blues #ArtForm #Luxury #FineArt #RSI #Jazz #Piano #Vinyl#BeBop #HardBop #FreeJazz #PostBop #France #Video #NYC #Berlin #Paris #TheloniousSpereMonk — Keeping The Idiom Alive Rashid Booker Harlem USA 125th St —
  10. Brother Dr. Yusef Lateef

    The Great African-American Classical Art-Form [Playlist] 58 Tracks 5 Hours https://open.spotify.com/user/121809214/playlist/67E2cildyR5tdjY5NWlUg3 Brother Dr. Yusef Lateef There is a lot of conversation these days about experimental music. But despite mentioning the more obvious names, such as John Coltrane or Sun Ra, there is a basic lack of understanding that of so-called jazz from Armstrong to Osby is seat-of-the-pants experimental music, a white-knuckle ride of expressionism for musician and audience alike. Since the late 20s New York has been the town where a so-called jazz musician must go to make it. It is the premier urban landscape in the world, dominated by its skyscrapers and its legends. Even without its music, it has an aura. It is a city on the cutting edge, be it Duke Ellington at The Cotton Club, Sonny Rollins blowing on The Williamsburg Bridge or Ornette Coleman in 1959 @ The Five Spot. It is the town where the likes of Parker and Gillespie worked through the changes that would create the Be-bop idiom, that revolutionized modern music at the legendary Minton's Playhouse. It was in New York, that Billie Holiday debuted Strange Fruit at the nation's first multi-racial venue, Cafe Society. Rashid Booker "The Jazz Aficionado" Keeping The Idiom Alive Hey! Thanks for stopping by, please like our page and share the content. The Most Influential African-American Cultural Network in the Universe! https://www.facebook.com/keepingtheidiomalive/ Keeping The Idiom Alive Rashid Booker Harlem USA 125th St
  11. "Rhythm" Changes

    yup! The Great African-American Classical Art-Form The Story of Charlie Parker's 'Ko Ko' http://www.npr.org/series/100920965/music-articles/ Charlie Parker was born Aug. 29, 1920. On his birthday, we remember the jazz legend with a report that aired on Weekend Edition in August 2000. The man people called "Bird" was a brilliant improviser on the alto saxophone and a pioneer of the post-war style known as bebop. One his early masterpieces was the tune "Ko Ko." The two-minute and 53-second record has a simple structure. It begins with the alto saxophone and trumpet playing in unison, followed by Parker and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie trading eight-bar melodic phrases, then another quick unison bridge. "And then bang — and there literally is a bang, Max Roach plays a bang — and it goes into Charlie Parker's solo," says Gary Giddins, author of Celebrating Bird: The Triumph of Charlie Parker. This was Parker's first record as a leader — his first opportunity to step out front and state his own case for the high-speed melodic inventiveness and off-beat playing that characterized the new style called bebop. "This is played at supersonic velocity, where there are no predictable beats," says Giddins. "It's like a ping-pong ball being blown by a fan in a very small room, where he changes the accents on every measure, on every phrase. Some of the phrases are extremely long; some are just short — they're little riffs like 'Do-be-dap, a-do-be-dap' that sound like it's a knife blade going through the music. Then he'll do something like — he quotes at the beginning of the second chorus, he plays the old piccolo obbligato from 'High Society,' a very traditional New Orleans lick, which Parker takes and he makes it fit. And I swear, the first time you hear it it's like somebody dumped a bucket of ice water over your head, because it's not like anything that preceded it." In a rare 1951 interview conducted by saxophonist Paul Desmond and DJ John McLelland, Parker was asked how his playing managed to break so violently with the alto styles of the day, those of Johnny Hodges and Benny Carter. Parker answered that he just played like he always had. "Ever since I've ever heard music, I thought it should be very clean, very precise — as clean as possible, anyway, and more or less tuned to people. Something they could understand, something that was beautiful, you know? Because definitely there are stories and stories and stories that can be told." I swear, the first time you hear it it's like somebody dumped a bucket of ice water over your head. Gary Giddins The story Parker set out to tell in "Ko Ko" was actually not new. Parker wanted to record his version of "Cherokee," a popular dance tune by Ray Noble that was a huge hit for Charlie Barnet in 1939. It was recorded that same year by Parker's idol, tenor player Lester Young, with the Count Basie band. The difficult chord changes in "Cherokee" provided the template for Parker's new style. He learned how to play bebop improvising on "Cherokee." But when Parker went into the studio to record his version, he ran into a problem, says jazz historian Phil Schaap. Schaap remastered the original "Ko Ko" tapes for reissue on CD. He says Savoy Records producer Teddy Reig was not about to pay royalties, so we wouldn't let his musicians cover other people's songs, something that Parker and his group didn't know when they launched into their first take of "Cherokee." "On the outtake, they play the very same arrangement that is 'Ko Ko,' and then they jump into the melody of 'Cherokee' and Teddy would go [whistles], 'Hold it! Hold it! You can't play' — and it cuts like that," says Schaap. "'[Reig's] boss, Herman Lubinsky of Savoy Records, he's making a fortune by using chord structures of pre-existing tunes and placing new melodies on them, or even if there's no melody, calling it a new tune.' That's his gig. That's his scene. And, of course, that is the device of bebop composition, most divinely for Charlie Parker when playing the ambitious changes of Ray Noble's 'Cherokee.'" So on the next take, Parker played the same arrangement without the "Cherokee" melody, and he called it "Ko Ko." But there were other improvisations on that November day. First, Dizzy Gillespie was never supposed to play on the record. "Diz was a spectator by initial intent," says Schaap. "The Savoy ledgers state that when this record date was assembled, it was going to be Charlie Parker's first record date as a leader, to distance him from Dizzy and the fact that Dizzy, by the way, had signed with the Musicraft-Guild family of labels, so Dizzy's not going to be there. And Parker wisely had already made his decision to get a more spare style as a foil for the other horn, if it was going to be a bebop quintet. And so he hires Miles Davis — all of 19 [years old] — but he couldn't master playing that intricate arrangement of 'Ko Ko.'" And then there was the problem with the piano player. Parker had hoped to use Bud Powell, his colleague in pioneering the new bebop style during the war years. But Powell had been arrested after defending Thelonious Monk in a fistfight with the police, and nobody knew where he was. At the last minute, Parker brought along a piano player from Minnesota named Sadik Hakim, who, like Parker, lived in the Dewey Square Hotel. I put quite a bit of study into the horn, that's true. In fact, the neighbors threatened to ask my mother to move once, when we were living out west. They said I was driving them crazy with the horn. Charlie Parker "Sadik had a style," says Schaap, "but he didn't have a New York City union affiliation. And the 802 delegate said, 'Well, where's your union card?' So Sadik rolls out a Duluth, Minn., American Federation of Musicians membership card with an attached piece of worn-out paper from '44, early '44, that allowed him to work on a Duluth card in Chicago. They said, 'Well, what's this junk, man? You can't play on the date.' And he stood there, so now they didn't have a piano player." Gillespie ended up playing both the piano and the trumpet parts on "Ko Ko." "He plays the trumpet introduction on Miles' trumpet with his mouthpiece," says Schaap, "puts the horn down, goes over to the piano and in one of the most seamless moments ever, takes over the chording behind Parker's solo." Despite the last-second personnel changes, Parker nailed a flawless solo on "Ko Ko." But critic Gary Giddins says it takes careful listening to appreciate it. "The fabulous thing about 'Ko Ko' and Parker's music is that the second time you listen to it — and the third and the fourth and the fifth — the more you listen to it, as you really get to know it, you realize that it isn't just a bunch of noise," Giddins says. "It isn't just a bunch of incredibly fast notes. It's all melody. "But it's played so fast that you as a listener have to train yourself to be able to listen as fast as Charlie Parker plays. And if you listen at the same velocity of his phrasing, then you begin to hear that it's just nothing more than one melodic rhythmic concept after another. Parker's the most spontaneous of musicians, and yet at the same time, he is always coming up with melodic ideas, always. There's a tremendous core of beauty and logic and coherence in everything he does." The records that came out of the "Ko Ko" sessions introduced Parker to listeners beyond the New York clubs. Soon radio carried him to an even wider audience. Parker became a sensation. Musicians everywhere began to emulate his alto style — and his lifestyle — and jazz began to change from music for dancing to music for listening. In 1947, Parker played "Ko Ko" at Carnegie Hall as a guest soloist with the Dizzy Gillespie Big Band. Four years later, when Parker was asked how he developed his extraordinary technique, he told his interviewers how he got to Carnegie Hall. "I put quite a bit of study into the horn, that's true," Parker said. "In fact, the neighbors threatened to ask my mother to move once, when we were living out west. They said I was driving them crazy with the horn. I used to put in at least from 11 to 15 hours a day. "Definitely, study is absolutely necessary in all forms — it's just like any talent that's born within somebody. It's just like a good pair of shoes when you put a shine on it, you know? Like schooling brings out the polish of any talent. It happens anywhere in the world." Parker's talent was immense, but fleeting. He was only 25 when he recorded "Ko Ko," but he was already addicted to heroin. Ten years later, ravaged by drugs and alcohol, he died in a New York apartment. But with that record on Nov. 26, 1945, Parker assured his immortality.
  12. "Rhythm" Changes

    yes
  13. "Rhythm" Changes

    Bird, did it with Ko Ko,! example https://youtu.be/ILgwmki6IiE
  14. The Great African-American Classical Art-Form The Cultural Psychodynamics of Racism Consider those nightclubs such as the Cotton Club where performers were black but the clientele was exclusively white. Why did all those white people seek black entertainment? No doubt most of them came for the erotic floor show, but some of them were interested in the music. Why? The question is not a new one and the answer is obvious -- in the same way that the applicability of Freud to racism is so obvious that it has been little discussed. European-Americans have liked African-American music because it has expressive values which are lacking in European and European-American music (Crouch, 1990b, p.83; Keil, 1996, p.49; Small, 1987, p.154; Williams, 1983, p.254). In particular, as we've seen above, African-American music is comfortable with sexuality, while European music is not. People may have come to the Cotton Club to see black bodies enact jungle pseudo-rituals on stage, but they left with the expressive sound of African-American music boring into their brains. While the jazz club is ostensibly a place for entertainment, it also functions on a deeper level as a school, one in which the teachers are black and the students are white. They are learning a cultural stylization of emotion which is adequate to their needs than the one they learned at home, in school, or in the church. Where the lyncher and his descendants are desperately trying to preserve the restrictiveness of his culture, the white jazz devotee, and his descendants, is trying to break free from that restrictiveness by learning elements of a different culture. In the nightclub scenario, Africa is the teacher and Europe the student (cf. Asante, 1987, p.59). Source Harvard Press: Benzon, W.L., 1997. Music Making History: Africa Meets Europe in the United States of the Blues. https://www.facebook.com/keepingtheidiomalive/