RogerF

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Everything posted by RogerF

  1. Sir Karl Jenkins

    "Lullaby for a Lonely Child" was one of Jenkins' and recorded both on Graham Collier's Down Another Road and by Nucleus. http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2012/jun/18/graham-collier-lullaby-lonely-child So was "Song for the Bearded Lady" Nucleus' signature tune!
  2. Ornette Coleman - RIP

    Well said. RIP. Amen to that, RIP Ornette
  3. Aggressive Big Band Recs

    Tubby Hayes Big Band at Ronnie Scott's in 1970 playing one of their most "aggressive" pieces from the album 200% Proof... "The Inner Splurge" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=knybg2tJXI8 [You need to watch from 2.40 in]
  4. Dropout Boogie

    In the course of reviewing a CD I noticed a distinct one second "dropout" which was disconcerting to hear as it disrupted the flow of the piece. I checked, playing it on other equipment and it was definitely a CD fault. Is this a common error, have others expwerienced this? Is "dropout" the correct technically term for this? Surprising in this digital recording age that a fault like this occurs. But at what stage, recording, mastering or burning?
  5. Mike Westbrook - finally the big band is back...

    Chris - I can't believe that our premier jazz composer and bandleader has to ask for gigs in the capital city. This is a ridiculous state of affairs and I know that there would be several hundred London-based fans who would willingly walk over hot coals to see the MWBB play at say the London Jazz Festival. Does Serious not have an interest? Seriously?
  6. Dropout Boogie

    This fault can sometimes be ameliorated by burning onto a pc, but if the fault is, as Scott said, with the original burning then this won't work. I ripped it after first finding the fault and played it on the pc and it was still there. I am marginally relieved that this may fault may not translate to the entire batch of CDs pressed (at least I hope so).
  7. Mike Westbrook - finally the big band is back...

    Thanks for that review Bev, I am sorely jealous and just wish Mike would play about 100 miles further East!
  8. Seriously, I believe this book is worth double the asking price - it was researched for over 10 years and it shows. Fascinating facts on every page.
  9. This is getting like the stock exchange reports! I think any price for this book is worth it and I'm not even getting paid to say that!
  10. I posted this in the Hum Dono thread but really it should go here: Tubbs news update! A very authoritative source has just revealed that Universal Music Group has now unearthed full master tapes for all of Tubby's Fontana records. Also found is the "lost" quartet session with Louis Stewart from 1969, alongside some tapes that have yet to be identified. Apparently some of this material was stored in Germany and has only latterly been brought back to the UK, hence the "lost" rumours. Additionally, some Tempo master tapes too, notably for Tubby's Groove have been located too. All the previously issued Japanese and Universal UK CDs of Tubby were dubbed from vinyl. In some cases (Return Visit and 100% Proof) from knackered vinyl!
  11. Hum Dono

    Thanks for the info, Roger. Does the "authoritive source" say whether/when these unearthed master tapes will be reissued? Not as yet, but the fact they have been found is significant. I was beginning to despair of this ever happening.
  12. Hum Dono

    Tubbs news update! A very authoritative source has just revealed that Universal Music Group has now unearthed full master tapes for all of Tubby's Fontana records. Also found is the "lost" quartet session with Louis Stewart from 1969, alongside some tapes that have yet to be identified. Apparently some of this material was stored in Germany and has only latterly been brought back to the UK, hence the "lost" rumours. Additionally, some Tempo master tapes too, notably for Tubby's Groove have been located too. All the previously issued Japanese and Universal UK CDs of Tubby were dubbed from vinyl. In some cases (Return Visit and 100% Proof) from knackered vinyl!
  13. Hum Dono

    Permit me to note that this writing by Dutton is not clear enough. It would have indeed been if they had wrote that the LP was "cut from the original analogue master stereo tape". Unless Dutton has INDEED access to the original tape (I refer to Sidewinder's message earlier in this thread - thanks!) but they do not want to get in trouble with the original/legitimate owner (Universal?) of the original master tape by mentioning it. Point taken, but I think the only way to determine this is by buying it in vinyl (I already have the CD) and seeing whether it is indeed taken from the original analogue master tape or bizarrely, a tape of the CD of the LP of the tape (if you see what I mean). Comparing the price of this LP to other newly-pressed ones, this is relatively cheap so I'm definitely ordering this one.
  14. that Philips reissue of "100% proof" may have a poor cover but it sounds great. Way better than the domestic CD ( which I've long since ditched) Is that the CD that purports to be in stereo but is in fact mono? I remember there was some controversy about the sound of many of his re-issued CDs from Universal. I guess the masters could do with being given some TLC and reissued again. Wonder what are the chances of that happening.....? 100% Proof was release on CD by Universal in mono, because the stereo tapes couldn't be located. But hearing it in its original stereo as on the vinyl versions, is a real ear-opener. The big band blasts out of the speakers. As for Mexican Green, I only had a beaten-up vinyl copy which cost a small fortune to purchase secondhand, so when the CD was released by Universal Japan and latterly the UK arm, I was grateful to hear it in all its glory. I didn't find it sub-standard at all. As for "The book" I agree, it is totally un-put-downable and yes it's got to be a book of the year.
  15. Hum Dono

    Dutton Vocalion have just released this as a vinyl LP cut from the analogue stereo tape - so that source is rather unequivocal I'm going to order this - quite reasonably priced too: http://www.duttonvocalion.co.uk/proddetail.asp?prod=VOCLP3303
  16. Yes it was, but Simon deserves all the credit as it was an absolutely mammoth task. A really invaluable insight into British modern jazz of that period, too infrequently covered IMO.
  17. John Renbourn, R.I.P.

    Pentangle, the first jazz folk fusion band? (Danny Thompson continued this later with his Whatever group). Certainly Pentangle pre-dated Fairport Convention for "plugged in" folk! Renbourn and Jansch (also sadly passed on prematurely) were stellar guitarists and they in turn had carried on something of a jazz-blues-folk tradition from (also sadly gone before his time) Davy Graham. Folk wasn't always finger-in-the-ear stuff (not that there's anything wrong with that either!). RIP John.
  18. Mike King R.I.P.

    I learned today that Mike King has died. He made a substantial contribution to British jazz, releasing previously unissued archival tapes and some re-issues of long-lost albums on his Reel Recordings label. He also assisted in sourcing and mastering some of the Ogun releases of archival material. Just some of the musicians whose music he released include Ian Carr, Don Rendell, Gary Windo, Mike Osborne, Elton Dean, Ray Russell, Bob Downes and Harry Miller. But there was more too. He was also the author of the now highly sought after, long out of print book on Robert Wyatt "Wrong Movements". I met him on a couple of occasions and he was a really nice guy. R.I.P. Mike.
  19. Mike King R.I.P.

    Suicide.
  20. Michel Portal

    Alors! with John Surman and the Trio - reissued on CD a few years back is definitely worth hearing (as mentioned by mjazzg above)
  21. The Real Great Escape by Larry Coryell - I wish this would get a CD reissue, such a great guitarist.
  22. Nostalgia, reminiscence and the history of music, I think you've put your finger on it. Nostalgia surely is a highly significant factor in the identification of the "golden age" of British jazz? I plead guilty to nostalgia influencing a lot of my jazz proclivities. An example of this might, and I stress might, be the late Philip Larkin's stance on jazz - which was, broadly speaking that anything produced post-war was usually rubbish. I think mouldy fygge as a term to describe Larkin was too generous. However, everyone's entitled to their opinion and Larkin had his. Or as Ronnie Scott said "when I want your opinion, I'll give it to you". The trouble with nostalgia is that if you are steeped too much in it you tend to readily dismiss the contemporary stuff and considering many of the nostalgia heroes of the past are now sadly dead, it's quite dangerous to lionise them without also lending an ear to the present. Whilst much of the older music was very good, it is too easy to glorify all of it. I stand by my favourites of yore, but there is some incredible new music now being produced by the next generation and this should be celebrated, without necessarily forgetting the musical achievements of the past, some of which, to borrow an oft-employed phrase from Russell Brand created new paradigms in music.
  23. I know how he feels. I tried so hard to like "Shades of Blue" and "Dusk Fire" as much as their reputations suggested. Nice enough but I couldn't hear anything desperately original (cloth ears?) Dare I say the same about "Hum Dono" (ducks for cover) which again didn't really live up to its build up. Whereas I thought both Harriot's "Free Form" and "Abstract" surpassed their reputations on reissue I rather like 'Hum Dono'. Agree on the two Harriotts - they did live up to the promise. It wasn't JJI...can't recall the name of that rather studious Jazz mag Richard Cook used to edit. It was Jazz Review (I'm looking at it now, Issue 63 December, 2004) and the subsequent issue (65 February 2005) contained furious letters of riposte to the Brian Morton RCQ reviews including one from Don Rendell himself. I can't say whether the five RCQ albums recorded for the EMI Columbia label under Denis Preston's supervision were earth-shattering or still stand the test of time - this is a matter of opinion. But in my opinion, certain elements of the RCQs albums were ahead of their time and in many respects the RCQ moved the canon of British jazz (almost uniquely for this time their material was all original, not dependent on American standards) forward into the "golden age". For my money my favourite RCQ album is Phase III particularly for Ian Carr's two pieces Crazy Jane and Les Neige D'Antan, previously recorded on the album Springboard (with Jeff Clyne, Trevor Watts and John Stevens) and dying to be reissued.
  24. Talent indeed! Not surprising then that two of the participants on one of my "100" (Where Fortune Smiles, w/ John McLaughlin and Dave Holland) went on to even greater things with Miles Davis.
  25. Bev, I think the deification aspect is somewhat determined by the sense of time and place - and I was there at that time - busier later on so wasn't there as much - although the notable aforementioned exception in Loose Tubes. I only selected 10 albums as a sample but I could have probably selected 100 from that period which to my mind were exceptional. I would be the first to admit that it's all terribly subjective but I do suffer a certain tinge of guilt from listening more to that ('golden') period than to later years by the same artists. Westbrook's "London Bridge" may be a greater work but I am more emotionally drawn to "Celebration" or "Marching Song". Like I say though, I do feel guilt over this because the musicians are developing their art over time. Perhaps as the composers' respective technical abilities and ambitions increase, the relative simplicity of their earlier works means they are easier to recall. So they're not better, just more memorable?