jazzbo

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About jazzbo

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    Just a Lucky So and So

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  • Gender Male
  • Location Chardon, Ohio
  • Interests My '08 Dyna Glide Fat Bob, music, books. My guitars and my basses and my keyboard and my drum sets.

    April 2013 I have moved to Westlake, Ohio, one mile from the Bay Village, Ohio home of my parents, to help them stay in their home. I was able to keep my Mom in her own home til she passed in November 2014.

    I'm married to Lucinda Dwyer and so very happy to be so, love being under the same roof as her.

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  1. Lars Gullin

    They are good sets, decent sound, excellent music. If you get bit hard by the Gullin bug I then suggest you follow the Dragon releases (eleven volumes) and further. . . but this gets you a really good start, a big chunk of Lars' music and good notes. And they may be all the Lars many might need. Either one is a good starting point (I like all the music from these years, don't really have a favorite). And dusty groove has this later date at a price I thought must have been a mistake, but I've ordered copies twice at tis price and they still offer it: https://www.dustygroove.com/item/559209?sf=Lars+Gullin&incl_oos=1&incl_cs=1&kwfilter=Lars+Gullin&sort_order=artist It's a good one.
  2. Joni Mitchell and Blood on the Tracks

    From Wikipedia: Dylan commenced recording the album in New York City in September 1974. In December, shortly before Columbia was due to release the record, Dylan abruptly re-recorded much of the material in a studio in Minneapolis. The final album contains five tracks from New York and five from Minneapolis. And Dylan commenced recording at A & R Recording Studios in New York City on September 16, 1974. Bernstein has stated "the theme of returning ran through the sessions", so "it made a lot of sense to do it at A&R" A & R Studios was the former Columbia Records "Studio A", where Dylan had recorded six albums in the 1960s. The musicians quickly realized that Dylan was taking a "spontaneous" approach to recording.The session engineer, Phil Ramone, later said that Dylan transitioned from one song to another as if they were part of a medley. Ramone noted: Eric Weissberg and his band, Deliverance, originally recruited as session men, were rejected after two days of recording because they could not keep up with Dylan's pace. Dylan retained bassist Tony Brown from the band, and soon added organist Paul Griffin (who had also worked on Highway 61 Revisited) and steel guitarist Buddy Cage. After ten days and four sessions with the current lineup, Dylan had finished recording and mixing, and, by November, had cut a test pressing on the album. Columbia began to prepare to release the album before Christmas. Dylan played the test pressing for his brother, David Zimmerman, who persuaded Dylan the album would not sell because the overall sound was too stark. Robert Christgau also heard the early version of the album and called it "a sellout to the memory of Dylan's pre-electric period" At his brother's urging, Dylan agreed to re-record five of the album's songs in Sound 80 in Minneapolis, with backing musicians recruited by David. The new takes were accomplished in two days at the end of December 1974. Blood on the Tracks was released into stores on January 20, 1975 Personally I think the album as it is released is a masterpiece. I've heard a few of the tracks not released and they are great too, but I've lived with and deeply enjoyed the released version so long that that IS the album for me. I expect in the next few years we'll see a Bootleg Series volume dedicated to these.
  3. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    It's a well-recorded date. . . . solo piano, and very technically great playing. On the intellectual spectrum rather than the emotional in playing style and communication. Two tracks are experimental with plucked piano strings, banging on the piano body, extreme pedal use, etc. I got my copy for .99 from www,dustygroove.com An online review: http://www.jazzviews.net/alf-haggkvist-ndash-blue-serge.html
  4. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    Alf Haggkvist, "Blue Serge" Solo piano.
  5. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    David Arthur Skinner "Skinner Plays Skinner" solo piano.
  6. Child Prodigy

    I have his album released several years ago and saw him interviewed on 60 minute. He's a talent, indeed.
  7. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    The Jeremy Manasia Trio featuring Peter Bernstein "Metamorphosis"
  8. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    Johnny King "The Meltdown" (Enja) with Larry Grenadier, Milton Cardona, David Sanchez, Steve Wilson, Steve Davis
  9. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    Nucleus with Leon Thomas "Live 1970" http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_5xbwgBuSIw/VIVstuMKXTI/AAAAAAAAZdw/dto4B_WLPxs/s1600/nucleus%2Bwith%2Bleon%2Bthomas%2B1970%2Bcover%2Bart.jpg[/img Nucleus with Leon Thomas "Live 1970" http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_5xbwgBuSIw/VIVstuMKXTI/AAAAAAAAZdw/dto4B_WLPxs/s1600/nucleus%2Bwith%2Bleon%2Bthomas%2B1970%2Bcover%2Bart.jpg[/img
  10. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    Wayne Shorter, "Speak No Evil" Blue Note SACD
  11. It's true, though he doesn't seem to "sing" like Keith does. But there is more to him than that, he writes very well, there's that Brazilian spirit in his music as well. (He's the son of guitarist Baden Powell). I'm really enjoying the Adventure Records releases I have from him, especially his entry in the series "Piano Jazz Masters" and his release "Estrada de Terra/Dirt Road."
  12. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    Phillipe Baden Powell (the guitarist's son) "Estrada de Terra/Dirt Road" . . . very nice!
  13. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    Right now, this very jazzy recording from Aretha Franklin, "Oh Yeah," via the new Jazz Connoisseur cd from Legacy Recordings (Sony)--this edition includes transfers of both the original tape and the crowd overdubbed tape.