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What vinyl are you spinning right now??

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Steve Lacy - Disposability (Italian Vik mono). This one, recorded in Rome in late 1965, is one of my very favorite Lacy albums. With Kent Carter and Aldo Romano, Lacy plays three Monk tunes, a Carla Bley piece, Cecil Taylor's "Tune 2," three improvised pieces, and his first recorded composition, "Barble." He seems to forgotten about that one - he later called "The Way" his "opus one." Anyway, it's a great one, and Lacy's only recording from 1965.

Yup that's a very nice LP. Years ago I bought a dubious vinyl "reissue" of this that sounded horrible...not long after bought a CD which sounded equally bad..until I finally found a mint original issue about 7 years ago and the sound on the original is amazing. No clipping in the saxophone and deep strong bass. A great session! I play this one more then some of his other post-prestige/new jazz 60s lps like "forest and the zoo" or "Sortie".

The most recent reissue is the CD from the Free Factory::

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Have either of you heard this particular reissue? And yes, that LP is awfully nice!

Yes, I have it, because I don't have Sortie in any other form. The sound on Disposability on this issue is just horrible. There are some sort of digital clicks through the music. It's not just my copy, others have confirmed their presence. If I ever find a copy of Sortie that I can afford, this CD is going into the trash.

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Jeff,

Do you know the Joe Sullivan in the same series? Excellent also.

I don't think that either of them ever made it to CD.

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Ralph Sutton - Backroom Piano (Verve). A mid-50s issue of some excellent 1949 tracks.

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No..I had a Spanish cd on disconforme...I think another thread commented that this combo pack cd didn't sound great either?

310275163788.jpg

Steve Lacy - Disposability (Italian Vik mono). This one, recorded in Rome in late 1965, is one of my very favorite Lacy albums. With Kent Carter and Aldo Romano, Lacy plays three Monk tunes, a Carla Bley piece, Cecil Taylor's "Tune 2," three improvised pieces, and his first recorded composition, "Barble." He seems to forgotten about that one - he later called "The Way" his "opus one." Anyway, it's a great one, and Lacy's only recording from 1965.

Yup that's a very nice LP. Years ago I bought a dubious vinyl "reissue" of this that sounded horrible...not long after bought a CD which sounded equally bad..until I finally found a mint original issue about 7 years ago and the sound on the original is amazing. No clipping in the saxophone and deep strong bass. A great session! I play this one more then some of his other post-prestige/new jazz 60s lps like "forest and the zoo" or "Sortie".

The most recent reissue is the CD from the Free Factory::

MI0003078143.jpg?partner=allrovi.com

Have either of you heard this particular reissue? And yes, that LP is awfully nice!

Yes, I have it, because I don't have Sortie in any other form. The sound on Disposability on this issue is just horrible. There are some sort of digital clicks through the music. It's not just my copy, others have confirmed their presence. If I ever find a copy of Sortie that I can afford, this CD is going into the trash.

OK, that's what I thought too, but wanted to compare it against the vinyl, which I don't have. Thanks.

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Jeff,

Do you know the Joe Sullivan in the same series? Excellent also.

I don't think that either of them ever made it to CD.

$%28KGrHqZHJBgE8ey95BjQBPQpzLoCDQ~~60_57

Ralph Sutton - Backroom Piano (Verve). A mid-50s issue of some excellent 1949 tracks.

Didn't know about the Sullivan, but I'll keep my eyes open.

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I had the Sullivan and it went away in my great vinyl sale necessary to begin issuing cds.

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Martial Solal - Son 66 (French Columbia/EMI mono)

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Gil Evans - Previously Released Recordings (Verve). Three cuts on this 1973 album are available on the CD issue of The Individualism of Gil Evans, but there are two quartet tracks which have only appeared here: Evans, bass trombonist Tony Studd, Paul Chambers, and Clifford Jarvis play Bird's "Cheryl" (mistitled "Blues in Orbit") and Al Cohn's "Ah Moore" (mistitled Isabel). Evans intended these to be studio "sketches," and after this album came out, asked that they never be issued again. They're very good, though, and I'm glad to have them.

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The Gellers (Emarcy Japan)

During this listen, I found my listening concentration was on the other Geller - Lorraine.

Edited by paul secor

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John Stevens' Folkus - The Life of Riley [Affinity]

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John Stevens' Folkus - The Life of Riley [Affinity]

I have that one from original release time. Nicely oddball.

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John Stevens' Folkus - The Life of Riley [Affinity]

I have that one from original release time. Nicely oddball.

Late to the party here as usual as only just purchased this week. I think it's an album with some lovely writing, especially for the brass. I'm less keen on but enjoy the guitar features. I detect little or any folk influence but they may be cloth ears.

It led me to this one which has similar brass voicings

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Harris Eisenstadt - Woodblock prints [No Business]

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Late to the party here as usual as only just purchased this week. I think it's an album with some lovely writing, especially for the brass. I'm less keen on but enjoy the guitar features. I detect little or any folk influence but they may be cloth ears.

Oh, I was late to the party too. I didn't know that much about Stevens (apart from the John Martyn connection and things I'd read) at the time. Remember seeing the 'Away' records but didn't buy them. Hoping someone will put those out soon.

Have very much enjoyed exploring Stevens in recent years.

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Mal Waldron/Jackie McLean--------Like old times--------(JVA/Victor) Japan 1976

McLean sounding much fresher hear than on another Japanese session from 1986 (Paddlewheel). This has a decent amount of spark and Mal is on top form

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LOVE'S DREAM - Bobby Bradford. Trevor Watts, Kent Carter, John Stevens. Emanem LP. I think this is a terrific album. Another instance (so many) where you hear the Ornette influence, and I find it interesting how it bounces up agains the Brit free jazz approach.

Stanley Crouch did the linter notes (!). This sentence interested me: "All of which, in my opinion, makes Bradford the most significant trumpet player to appear since the death of Booker Little and a figure in 'our' era who is comparable to Fats Navarro during the bebop era..." This was in 1975. When did Crouch jump on the Wynton bandwagon?

Edited by Leeway

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Mal Waldron/Jackie McLean--------Like old times--------(JVA/Victor) Japan 1976

McLean sounding much fresher hear than on another Japanese session from 1986 (Paddlewheel). This has a decent amount of spark and Mal is on top form

I like that album; a good one.

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LOVE'S DREAM - Bobby Bradford. Trevor Watts, Kent Carter, John Stevens. Emanem LP. I think this is a terrific album. Another instance (so many) where you hear the Ornette influence, and I find it interesting how it bounces up agains the Brit free jazz approach.

Stanley Crouch did the linter notes (!). This sentence interested me: "All of which, in my opinion, makes Bradford the most significant trumpet player to appear since the death of Booker Little and a figure in 'our' era who is comparable to Fats Navarro during the bebop era..." This was in 1975. When the Crouch jump on the Wynton bandwagon?

Crouch's liner notes appear on the CD reissue with the comment: "(As well as being a writer, Crouch was the also a drummer, who often played with Bradford on the Los Angeles free jazz scene. He subsequently moved to New York, gave up drumming, and became immersed in writing about more conservative areas of jazz.)" No further comment necessary.

Martin Davidson adds contemporary (2002) notes which shed more light on Bobby Bradford's 1973 sojourn in England.

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@ Paul Secor. Thanks Paul for the additional information.

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COSMOS -Sun Ra - Inner City LP. Sun Ra on the rocksichord.

Edited by Leeway

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THESIS - The Jimmy Giuffre 3 - Verve LP. Giuffre (cl), Steve Swallow (b), Paul Bley (p). It's still cool to hear Bley on "Sonic" start playing inside the piano.

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Elvin Jones - Coalition (BN Liberty). My first time hearing this in many years. I once had it on 8-track tape (!); I just found a near-mint copy. Even better than I remembered.

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LOVE'S DREAM - Bobby Bradford. Trevor Watts, Kent Carter, John Stevens. Emanem LP. I think this is a terrific album. Another instance (so many) where you hear the Ornette influence, and I find it interesting how it bounces up agains the Brit free jazz approach.

Stanley Crouch did the linter notes (!). This sentence interested me: "All of which, in my opinion, makes Bradford the most significant trumpet player to appear since the death of Booker Little and a figure in 'our' era who is comparable to Fats Navarro during the bebop era..." This was in 1975. When did Crouch jump on the Wynton bandwagon?

He's an odd duck. He wrote the notes to Jimmy Lyons' Give It Up on Soul Note (1985, in the eye of the Wynton hurricane) and praised him as the great post-Bird altoist. When he's not praising Lyons via Bird, he's talking a blanket of shit on free jazz and ignores the other musicians completely.

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Elvin Jones - Mr. Jones (BN). After Coalition, I wanted to hear some more Elvin on Blue Note.

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In the 1970s Stanley Crouch praised every and all free-jazz musicians to the skies, no matter how awful or incompetent they were. After Crouch met Murray and Marsalis 30+ years ago, Crouch despised all free-jazz musicians.

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Takehisa Kosugi "catch wave" (Sony, Japan)

Steve Lacy, Yuji Takahashi, Takehisa Kosugi "distant voices" (Columbia, Japan)

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