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What vinyl are you spinning right now??

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Walter Zuber Armstrong/Steve Lacy -----Alter Ego, Duets-----(World Artists) rec 1979 BIMHouse

 

New arrival picked up on the basis of Lacy - seems quite interesting so far.

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2 hours ago, Clunky said:

1976613.jpg

 

Walter Zuber Armstrong/Steve Lacy -----Alter Ego, Duets-----(World Artists) rec 1979 BIMHouse

 

New arrival picked up on the basis of Lacy - seems quite interesting so far.

Had a negative reaction to that one and haven't played it in years; I sometimes even cite this as the only Steve Lacy album I don't like. But that's not really fair, because like I say, it's been years since I've heard it. I need to pull it off the shelves and give it a spin soon. I suspect it's a lot better than I remember.

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2 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

Had a negative reaction to that one and haven't played it in years; I sometimes even cite this as the only Steve Lacy album I don't like. But that's not really fair, because like I say, it's been years since I've heard it. I need to pull it off the shelves and give it a spin soon. I suspect it's a lot better than I remember.

I had it years ago and could never get into it. No longer have it.

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Never picked this one up. The duo with Michael J. Smith also disappointed for the brief period it occupied my shelves. Maybe I should try that one again at least.

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1 hour ago, clifford_thornton said:

Never picked this one up. The duo with Michael J. Smith also disappointed for the brief period it occupied my shelves. Maybe I should try that one again at least.

That's funny - I've always liked that one. I think I've said around here somewhere that I think Michael played Lacy's compositions - as compositions - better than any other pianist.  Which, of course, is not the same as saying that he was the best pianist to play with Lacy.

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6 hours ago, Clunky said:

How's the Zagreb LP. I've hesitated picking this up in the past . Attracted by the cool Jazz Life cover but wary of the image of this being cocktail lounge music. 

Elegant! Reminiscent of Porgy and Bess from  MJQ with balkan tones. No breathtaking stuff, but no elevator music in my opinion.

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4 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

Had a negative reaction to that one and haven't played it in years; I sometimes even cite this as the only Steve Lacy album I don't like. But that's not really fair, because like I say, it's been years since I've heard it. I need to pull it off the shelves and give it a spin soon. I suspect it's a lot better than I remember.

I'd be interested in you thoughts upon renewed acquaintance. It has overtones of Cherry/Rollins in that Armstrong comes from a more bluesy place than Lacy. The connection between what each of them plays isn't immediately obvious (to me at least). Still found enough to enjoy though. 

41 minutes ago, aparxa said:

Elegant! Reminiscent of Porgy and Bess from  MJQ with balkan tones. No breathtaking stuff, but no elevator music in my opinion.

Thanks , I'll try to remember that next time I see a copy

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The College Concert of Pee Wee Russell and Henry Red Allen (Impulse mono)

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12 hours ago, Clunky said:

1976613.jpg

 

Walter Zuber Armstrong/Steve Lacy -----Alter Ego, Duets-----(World Artists) rec 1979 BIMHouse

Spinning tonight - and as I suspected, I'm finding more to enjoy than in the past. It's still in the bottom ten per cent of Lacy's output, as far as quality goes, and it certainly makes a better case for Lacy's flexibility and musicality than for Armstrong's. It's two musicians taking parallel paths that never quite intersect, although Lacy takes more steps toward Armstrong's world than Armstrong does toward Lacy's. I agree about the blues content of much of what Armstrong plays - that the aspect of his playing I enjoy the most.

It looks like Armstrong lived and taught in Bellingham, Washington, where some of my wife's family lives, and where I'll probably end up when she retires. I'll be there in a few days, in fact.

I'm glad I listened to this tonight, although it will probably be a few more years before I spin it again.

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6 hours ago, paul secor said:

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The College Concert of Pee Wee Russell and Henry Red Allen (Impulse mono)

 

23 hours ago, paul secor said:

Milt+Hinton+-+Here+Swings+The+Judge+-+LP

Milt Hinton: Here Swings the Judge (Famous Door)

Some great playing by the horns on both of these, but I found myself tuned in to the masterful bass playing on each.

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http://www.parisjazzcorner.com/en/pochs_g/0100629.jpg

Whitey Mitchell Sextette (ABC Paramount). Some very different Steve Lacy here; he was only 21 years, but already the most interesting and accomplished soloist here.

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Female Blues Singers - Volume B3 (Fantasy by Selmerphone). A valuable LP, on the predecessor to the Document label. Here are the complete known recordings of Marie Bradley, Evelyn Brickey, Florence Bristol, Ada Brown, Ardell "Shelly" Bragg, and Alberta Brown. Bradley, Bragg, and Alberta Brown are very good. I bought this album at the Louisiana Music Factory years ago after hearing one of the two Alberta Brown tracks on WWOZ. Her only released 78 was recorded in New Orleans in 1928, with a great quartet (trumpet, clarinet, piano, tuba) accompanying. The instrumentalists are often given as members of the Halfway House Orchestra, who recorded for Columbia the day before, but I think it's four of Johnny Miller's New Orleans Frolickers, who recorded the same day, only a few matrices later. That would make them Sharkey Bonano, Siidney Arodin, Johnny Miller, and Chink Martin. In any case, her voice is strong, if a little on the hard side.

Texas singer Ardell Bragg's voice was limited, but loose and flexible. The most interesting of her eight tracks is "Bird Nest Blues," the tune Charley Patton was trying to copy with his "Bird Nest Bound." He misunderstood Bragg's lyrics - Bragg's song is more coherent, but Patton's is more poetic.

I couldn't find a picture of this album online.

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http://www.flinkee.com/covers/124-1247-1247409-292/james-blood-ulmer-part-time-1983.jpg

James Blood Ulmer - Part Time (Rough Trade). The 1983 Montreux performance by my favorite Ulmer band, the Odyssey trio with Charles Burnham and Warren Benbow. Not as good as Odyssey, but engagingly muddy, raw, and intense.

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8 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

Spinning tonight - and as I suspected, I'm finding more to enjoy than in the past. It's still in the bottom ten per cent of Lacy's output, as far as quality goes, and it certainly makes a better case for Lacy's flexibility and musicality than for Armstrong's. It's two musicians taking parallel paths that never quite intersect, although Lacy takes more steps toward Armstrong's world than Armstrong does toward Lacy's. I agree about the blues content of much of what Armstrong plays - that the aspect of his playing I enjoy the most.

It looks like Armstrong lived and taught in Bellingham, Washington, where some of my wife's family lives, and where I'll probably end up when she retires. I'll be there in a few days, in fact.

I'm glad I listened to this tonight, although it will probably be a few more years before I spin it again.

Jeff thanks for taking the trouble and your thoughts. I perhaps don't have enough Lacy to have a bottom 10%. I listened to both sides several times last night and enjoyed quite a bit  of what I heard. Coming to it as a Lacy album one would be perhaps disappointed that Armstrong's playing somewhat rides rough shod over Lacy. It doesn't have the delicacy of Lacy's finest. In the end I can see where your reservations are coming from but I got sufficient enjoyment to keep the album....

 

Now playing ...

 

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Lee Morgan ---Here's Lee Morgan-------(Veejay) dg-stereo

 

 

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Howard McGhee---Nobody knows you when you're down and out----(United Artists) mono

Quartet setting with either piano or organ. Some of the latter sound excessively cheesy ( to me at least) but the overall album is good if not quite McGhee's best. All the tracks are short and somewhat uneven in quality. The title might suggest he was in desperate times (perhaps he was) but Howard's playing has a fractured sounding delicacy. Our friends in Spain have reissued this. 

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19 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

Spinning tonight - and as I suspected, I'm finding more to enjoy than in the past. It's still in the bottom ten per cent of Lacy's output, as far as quality goes, and it certainly makes a better case for Lacy's flexibility and musicality than for Armstrong's. It's two musicians taking parallel paths that never quite intersect, although Lacy takes more steps toward Armstrong's world than Armstrong does toward Lacy's. I agree about the blues content of much of what Armstrong plays - that the aspect of his playing I enjoy the most.

It looks like Armstrong lived and taught in Bellingham, Washington, where some of my wife's family lives, and where I'll probably end up when she retires. I'll be there in a few days, in fact.

I'm glad I listened to this tonight, although it will probably be a few more years before I spin it again.

Walter used to come up to Vancouver to record, teach and busk. I met him a few times and he was a nice guy and quite a character. I've always liked this LP, but certainly it's not in the top echelon of Lacy's works. The CD version has two further duets which appeared on the LP Call Notes.

Now playing... John Coltrane, Offering, Live at Temple University (Resonance). It's late period Coltrane, but compared to the Japan and Olatunji concerts, this one comes across as mellow.

 

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Ornette Coleman/Charlie Haden: Soapsuds Soapsuds (Artists House)

Sublime music - and who but Ornette would improvise on the theme from Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman ?

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Steve Lacy - Capers (Hat Hut). Unavailable in full on CD - the reissue has four and a half of the eight tracks of this double LP.

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28 minutes ago, paul secor said:

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The Blues of Sleepy John Estes Volume One (Swaggie)

wish I still had those.

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John Coltrane, Black Pearls (Prestige). 

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25 minutes ago, paul secor said:

If you want to hear the music, there's a reissue CD on Yazoo - not everything that's on the Swaggies, but a fine selection and excellent sound.

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 http://www.amazon.com/Aint-Gonna-Worried-More-1929-1941/dp/B000000G8G/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1458181485&sr=1-1&keywords=sleepy+john+estes

I am aware. I have memories of John, a son and Hammie at 7 W. Grand Ave back in the day. 

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26 minutes ago, Chuck Nessa said:

I am aware. I have memories of John, a son and Hammie at 7 W. Grand Ave back in the day. 

I've only heard the recordings. You were blessed to hear the real thing.

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