wolff

What vinyl are you spinning right now??

41,887 posts in this topic

19 hours ago, mjazzg said:

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Gunter Hampel and his Galaxie Dreamband - Out From Under [Birth]

heavily featuring Perry Robinson RIP

this again. Followed by, to continue remembering and appreciating Perry Robinson   

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Theo Jorgensmann - In Time [AKM Records]

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Henry Grimes - The Call [ESP-Disk]

a great recording with some special Robinson contributions

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Perry Robinson see front cover bottom left:

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GUNTER HAMPEL AND HIS GALAXIE DREAMBAND: JOURNEY TO THE SONG WITHIN. BIRTH 0017 [1974]

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On 12/3/2018 at 11:12 AM, kh1958 said:

Bunky Green, Transformation (Vanguard)

This is going to come out wrong - but that's an awful pop/jazz album that's a great subversive pop/jazz album. Bunky's bizarre intro to "Feelings" is worth the price of admission.

I love Bunky Green.

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46 minutes ago, jeffcrom said:

This is going to come out wrong - but that's an awful pop/jazz album that's a great subversive pop/jazz album. Bunky's bizarre intro to "Feelings" is worth the price of admission.

I love Bunky Green.

I cannot disagree.

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4 hours ago, paul secor said:

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👍👍👍!!!

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9 hours ago, paul secor said:

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Agreed:tup:tup:tup

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Makaya McCraven - Where We Come From [International Anthem/Total Refreshment]

the sound of young London and Chicago in perfect harmony...

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12 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

This is going to come out wrong - but that's an awful pop/jazz album that's a great subversive pop/jazz album. Bunky's bizarre intro to "Feelings" is worth the price of admission.

I love Bunky Green.

I think the only Bunky I have is on that Paul Serrano on Riverside (which I love). Probably need to rectify.

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9 hours ago, clifford_thornton said:

I think the only Bunky I have is on that Paul Serrano on Riverside (which I love). Probably need to rectify.

I'd start with Places We've Never Been on Vanguard. His deal with the label called for him to make two pop/jazz albums, at which point he'd get to make an album according to his preferences. Places We've Never Been is that album. It must have sold dozens of copies, and the label dropped him.

There are two excellent albums from the first decade of this century: Another Place on Label Bleu and The Salzau Quartet Live at Jazz Baltica on Traumton. The former has Jason Moran on drums.

All of these represent Green's playing after he reinvented himself after his early-60s soul jazz albums. I think of his mature style as "sideways jazz" rather than straight-ahead jazz, if that makes any sense.

 

Edited by jeffcrom

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A typical evening's progression in the jeffcrom house: avant-ish to mainstream to New Orleans trad.

New York Contemporary Five - Consequences (Japanese Fontana)

Duke Pearson - Wahoo (BN 80s issue)

Preacher Rollo and the Saints - Ostrich Walk (Lion)

The last one is not for everyone, for sure. Rollo Layton was a Miami-based drummer, and by all accounts a pretty unpleasant person. His playing is kind of corny, but eight of the twelve tracks here have New Orleanian Tony Parenti on clarinet, and he elevates the music quite a bit. And all but two of these 1951-55 tracks have Marie Marcus on piano. She was a local-hero type journeywoman jazz player (in Miami, then Cape Cod) who was so admired by Whitney Balliett that he wrote a profile of her for The New Yorker. These are the only recordings of her I have. Lion was the cheap-label subsidiary of MGM.

Edited by jeffcrom

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Last one before bed:

Fats Domino - Let the Four Winds Blow (Imperial). An odd one - but that's okay, because it's Fats. It's a reminder that, at least at one time in the US, albums were places to put all the non-hits, with a few hits thrown in. Only two of these songs broke the Top 40 (the title song and "You Win Again"), and some of the selections are pretty odd ("Along the Navaho Trail," "Shanty In an Old Shanty Town"), but it's Fats! And Mr. Lee Allen and the great Roy Montrell are in the band. So I'm on board for the entire ride.

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There were often oldies on Fats's albums.  I especially liked "When My Dreamboat Comes Home" on his first Lp and of course "My Blue Heaven" was one of his first big hits. (Of course at the time I didn't know they were oldies.  They were new to me. 

Edited by medjuck

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5 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

R-2750781-1332089808.jpeg.jpg  R-2242183-1518029581-7696.jpeg.jpg  R-3708151-1355539585-2599.jpeg.jpg

A typical evening's progression in the jeffcrom house: avant-ish to mainstream to New Orleans trad.

New York Contemporary Five - Consequences (Japanese Fontana)

Duke Pearson - Wahoo (BN 80s issue)

Preacher Rollo and the Saints - Ostrich Walk (Lion)

The last one is not for everyone, for sure. Rollo Layton was a Miami-based drummer, and by all accounts a pretty unpleasant person. His playing is kind of corny, but eight of the twelve tracks here have New Orleanian Tony Parenti on clarinet, and he elevates the music quite a bit. And all but two of these 1951-55 tracks have Marie Marcus on piano. She was a local-hero type journeywoman jazz player (in Miami, then Cape Cod) who was so admired by Whitney Balliett that he wrote a profile of her for The New Yorker. These are the only recordings of her I have. Lion was the cheap-label subsidiary of MGM.

I must admit I don´t have much Duke Pearson, I have him on some Donald Byrd, on the "Idle Moments" where he contributed most, and his own "Sweet Honey Bee". My question is about the title "Wahoo". Do they play that old bebop tune "Wahoo" (Tadd´s riff on Perdido) or is "Wahoo" not related to the old Dameron-composition ?

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6 hours ago, chewy-chew-chew-bean-benitez said:

whats going on with this takin' off lp on ebay rt now- its a ny usa but look at the unusual cover- 

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This cover looks as if it was left in the sun for a long time. The red ink is almost completely bleached away. Paper masking tape is nasty stuff. $399? Really?

If you want the best sounding version of this on vinyl, buy the Cisco Music LP. It sounds great. I've owned an RVG stereo pressing and the Cisco pressing beats it handily.

FWIW, I still play the TOCJ CD more than anything else. :)

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4 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

I must admit I don´t have much Duke Pearson, I have him on some Donald Byrd, on the "Idle Moments" where he contributed most, and his own "Sweet Honey Bee". My question is about the title "Wahoo". Do they play that old bebop tune "Wahoo" (Tadd´s riff on Perdido) or is "Wahoo" not related to the old Dameron-composition ?

No - not related to the bebop line. Pearson's "Wahoo" is an original 5/4 blues.

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13 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

I'd start with Places We've Never Been on Vanguard. His deal with the label called for him to make two pop/jazz albums, at which point he'd get to make an album according to his preferences. Places We've Never Been is that album. It must have sold dozens of copies, and the label dropped him.

There are two excellent albums from the first decade of this century: Another Place on Label Bleu and The Salzau Quartet Live at Jazz Baltica on Traumton. The former has Jason Moran on drums.

All of these represent Green's playing after he reinvented himself after his early-60s soul jazz albums. I think of his mature style as "sideways jazz" rather than straight-ahead jazz, if that makes any sense.

I second the love for Bunky's Places We've Never Been. :tup:tup:tup 

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MILES_DAVIS_THE%2BESSENTIAL%2BMILES%2BDA

French CBS Henri Renaud production (3LPs)

with bonus EP ‘Great Expectations/The Little Blue Frog’.

Edited by sidewinder

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4 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

No - not related to the bebop line. Pearson's "Wahoo" is an original 5/4 blues.

I love that tune, the ensemble voicings give me the shivers. Henderson rules

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5 hours ago, sidewinder said:

MILES_DAVIS_MILES%2BIN%2BTHE%2BSKY-44788

UK CBS orange label, stereo

One of my favourits from the later period of the second great quintet.

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