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Woody Allen

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I forget the name of it right now, but the one with the jazz saxophonist and the magic of the Chinese herbalist is one of my very favorites.

Pretty funny one!

That one was 'Alice' with Mia Farrow and William Hurt. Joe Mantegna was the musician.

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I just saw MIGHTY APHRODITE again a few days ago, and while it's not absolutely top flight Woody it's damn funny in spots.

Dan and Lon were discussing his books - truly, truly timeless, ingenious comedy. The bit about the two guys playing chess by mail Jim R mentions (Gossage-Vardebedian Papers), where a letter gets lost somewhere in the middle and they get off-sync (and both appear to be trying to cheat each other to boot) is priceless, as is the one about the invention of the sandwich. And who could forget "Fabrizio's: A Criticism and Response," wherein the cuisine at a restaurant is reviewed from various political viewpoints? Classic.

Edited by DrJ

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Sleeper. One of my favorites- I've almost seen it too many times.

I know what you mean. Back when I was in junior high, they seemed to show Play It Again, Sam on TV all the time. I can't count how many times I've seen it. Also, it's one of the few that was written but NOT directed by Woody; I still think of it as a Woody Allen film though.

I agree with all the praise for the books. They're great.

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Shortly after I first saw "Stardust..." back in college (late 80's), I went for a good 5 years usually saying that "Stardust Memories" was my all-time favorite movie, period. (Not just favorite Woody Allen movie, but favorite of all movies.)

But I've seen a bunch more films since then. And I haven't seen "Stardust Memories" in probably close to 10 years. And I'm quite sure I wouldn't pick any Woody Allen film as my "all-time favorite" (though lard only knows what I would pick? Probably a classic copout, and say "Citizen Kane", though that'd probably be at least a half-honest response most days).

But if I had to pick my favorite Woody Allen film, now, looking back on having seen most of them back when I was in college (and few since, 'cept what I've seen in the theaters, off and on, here and there), I might have to go with these two (below), with the top-nod going to "Manhattan" (over "Annie Hall).

t07117jnpo6.jpg and t00950rimgn.jpg

Edited by Rooster_Ties

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And on a nearly unrelated note -- anybody here see "Celebrity" (B&W, 1998)??

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Certainly not Allen's best (probably not even close) -- but I remember seeing it in a nearly empty theater when it first came out, and enjoying it quite a bit, generally. Faint praise, perhaps, but I only had moderate expectations for it -- and they were all mostly exceeded. Worth a rent, sometime, in anyone is so inclined.

Edited by Rooster_Ties

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Almost forgot about this one. :tup:tup:tup:tup:tup

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"Crimes and Misdemeanors" (1989). Very underrated I would guess, or at least it's certainly not the first thing most people think of when they think of Woody Allen. Haven't seen it in years, but my memory is that Martin Landau was brilliant in this.

Might just have to rent this one soon. I'm sure my wife probably hasn't seen it, and I suspect she'd enjoy it. And it's not an overtly "Woody Allen"-ish film either (something my wife doesn't care for -- so yeah, "Annie Hall" and "Sleeper" are really not her cup of tea). But this one she might go for.

Anyone else like "Crimes and Misdemeanors" quite a bit too?? Probably one of his very best 'later' films, hands down.

Edited by Rooster_Ties

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Damn, another one I'd forgotten about...

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"Husbands and Wives" (1992). Herky-jerky hand-held camera through most of this one, if I remember right. Very confrontational stuff. Can't remember too much more, other than I think I liked it quite a bit.

Wonder if I'd think the same thing now, though. Funny how we react to movies in different ways, at different times in our lives. Somehow I suspect I'd see this one with different eyes (perhaps knowing slightly more about Woody's personal life now, more than any of us care too - probably).

Might still like it, but I suspect less than the first time I saw it --- again, years ago.

Edited by Rooster_Ties

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I'm guessing I'm the only one here who's ever seen "Shadows and Fog" (1991).

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Hardly remember anything about it, other than it seemed like Woody's homage to Fritz Lang, with a dash of "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" thrown in for good measure. But as far as how the plot for this one goes, I'm a blank slate.

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My favorite of his screwball comedy movies is "Sleeper". Bits of it remind me of every bad sci-fi series/movie from that same era (Logan's Run, Space 1999, etc...).

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Edited by Rooster_Ties

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I'm guessing I'm the only one here who's ever seen "Shadows and Fog" (1991).

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Hardly remember anything about it, other than it seemed like Woody's homage to Fritz Lang, with a dash of "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" thrown in for good measure.  But as far as how the plot for this one goes, I'm a blank slate.

I saw this one. John Malkovich, Madonna, Mia Farrow as circus performers. Jodie Foster, Lily Tomlin and Kathy Bates as prostitutes at a brothel (:huh:). But on the plus side, Fred Gwynne and Kurtwood Smith were also in it. Doing what, I can't remember. The only shadows and fog that I remember was the shadow in my wallet where the $5 I spent to rent this movie was, and the fog in my head from trying to follow the plot. On the other hand, if someone want to reference some movies in their own film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and Fritz Lang's M are two great choices.

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I've seen all those RT, and I really love "Crimes and Misdemeanors." Going to to have to watch that again some time soon!

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Deconstructing Harry - a dark comedy. I think I was the only one in the theater when I saw it.

Harry Block is a well-regarded novelist whose tendency to thinly-veil his own experiences in his work, as well as his un-apologetic attitude and his proclivity for pills and whores, has left him with three ex-wives that hate him. As he is about to be honored for his writing by the college that expelled him, he faces writer's block and the impending marriage of his latest flame to a writer friend. As scenes from his stories and novels pass and interact with him, Harry faces the people whose lives he has affected - wives, lovers, his son, his sister. (from IMDB.com)

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I really dug that one too, and the theatre was surprisingly populated! :huh:

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What I also like about Woody Allen is that he is among the rare current cinematographers still shooting films in black and white. Some of the best of those include 'Manhattan', 'Zelig', 'Shadows and Fog' and 'Stardust Memories'.

'Celebrity' also was shot in black and white but I don't rate that one as high as those others.

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Since this is (I think) a jazz forum, I just want to say that I love his movie and soundtrack to Wild Man Blues (about his Dixieland jazz band and its tour of Europe; I can't believe no one has mentioned this one!) and the old classic jazz on films like Radio Days. I'd like to see/hear him play live, but it sounds a little pricey and the surroundings a bit stuffy. He's the first to admit he's no great clarinet player, but he enjoys playing, so more power to him! (I think he's named two of his kids after Satchmo & Bechet.)

Edited by Jeffro

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Deconstructing Harry - a dark comedy. I think I was the only one in the theater when I saw it.

Harry Block is a well-regarded novelist whose tendency to thinly-veil his own experiences in his work, as well as his un-apologetic attitude and his proclivity for pills and whores, has left him with three ex-wives that hate him. As he is about to be honored for his writing by the college that expelled him, he faces writer's block and the impending marriage of his latest flame to a writer friend. As scenes from his stories and novels pass and interact with him, Harry faces the people whose lives he has affected - wives, lovers, his son, his sister. (from IMDB.com)

Isn't this the one which begins with a scene in which Julia Louis- Dreyfus (Elaine from Seinfeld) is giving her boyfriend a hummer? B-)

I took my then girlfriend-- now wife--to see this one-- she married me anyway :g

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Deconstructing Harry - a dark comedy. I think I was the only one in the theater when I saw it.

Isn't this the one which begins with a scene in which Julia Louis- Dreyfus (Elaine from Seinfeld) is giving her boyfriend a hummer? B-)

Waddayaknow - Deconstructing Harry just jumped to the top of my Netflix queue!

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Martin Landau was brilliant in this role. But the movie was a little scary, a little disturbing in how he relates how he had someone killed and how after a while he got over it and it didn't bother him anymore and he didn't think about it. That left a disturbing image in my mind for quite a while.

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My favorite of his screwball comedy movies is "Sleeper".  Bits of it remind me of every bad sci-fi series/movie from that same era (Logan's Run, Space 1999, etc...).

t06951bv73v.jpg

My buddy Scott, who used to own the Liberty Hall movie theatre in Lawrence, KS--the oldest motion picture theatre west of the Mississippi--was Woody's robot character for Halloween about five years ago. it was brilliant. I mean he looked exactly like him.

BTW: The house cylindrical house used in that film is in Colorado. We accidently drove by it once while attending a wedding in Evergreen.

Edited by Brandon Burke

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I had forgotten about Zelig. One of the funny details of that is in the scene where the workers are protesting Zelig, and one of the signs says "Zelig Unfair To Workers -- Holds Four Jobs"

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So many Woody fans around here! :excited:

Here are some brilliant quotes from the greatest filmmaker of our time :rolleyes: :

I am at two with nature.

It's not that I'm afraid to die, I just don't want to be there when it happens.

If it turns out that there is a God, I don't think that he's evil. But the worst that you can say about him is that basically he's an underachiever.

Not only is there no God, but try getting a plumber on weekends.

More than any other time in history, mankind faces a crossroads. One path leads to despair and utter hopelessness. The other, to total extinction. Let us pray we have the wisdom to choose correctly.

My one regret in life is that I am not someone else.

I was thrown out of college for cheating on the metaphysics exam; I looked into the soul of the boy sitting next to me.

It is impossible to travel faster than the speed of light, and certainly not desirable, as one's hat keeps blowing off.

It seemed the world was divided into good and bad people. The good ones slept better... while the bad ones seemed to enjoy the waking hours much more.

Life is divided into the horrible and the miserable.

What if everything is an illusion and nothing exists? In that case, I definitely overpaid for my carpet.

I'm astounded by people who want to 'know' the universe when it's hard enough to find your way around Chinatown.

When I was kidnapped, my parents snapped into action. They rented out my room.

What if nothing exists and we're all in somebody's dream? Or what's worse, what if only that fat guy in the third row exists?

Eternal nothingness is fine if you happen to be dressed for it.

(Getting Even, 'My Philosophy')

To you I'm an atheist; to God, I'm the Loyal Opposition.

Organized crime in America takes in over forty billion dollars a year and spends very little on office supplies.

Life is full of misery, loneliness, and suffering - and it's all over much too soon.

Interestingly, according to modern astronomers, space is finite. This is a very comforting thought-- particularly for people who can never remember where they have left things.

Most of the time I don't have much fun. The rest of the time I don't have any fun at all.

The lion and the calf shall lie down together but the calf won't get much sleep.

(Without Feathers, 'The Scrolls')

Some guy hit my fender, and I told him 'be fruitful, and multiply.' But not in those words. (Woody Allen: Clown Prince of American Humor)

I wanted to be an arch-criminal as a child, before I discovered I was too short. (Woody Allen: Clown Prince of American Humor)

I asked the girl if she could bring a sister for me. She did. Sister Maria Teresa. It was a very slow evening. We discussed the New Testament. We agreed that He was very well adjusted for an only child. (Woody Allen: Clown Prince of American Humor)

My parents were very old world. They come from Brooklyn, which is the heart of the Old World. Their values in life are God and carpeting. (Woody Allen: Clown Prince of American Humor)

If there is reincarnation, I'd like to come back as Warren Beatty's fingertips.

The only time my wife and I had a simultaneous orgasm was when the judge signed the divorce papers.

I do not believe in an after life, although I am bringing a change of underwear.

If you want to make God laugh, tell him your future plans.

If you're not failing every now and again, it's a sign you're not doing anything very innovative.

There are two types of people in this world: good and bad. The good sleep better, but the bad seem to enjoy the waking hours much more .

More than any time in history mankind faces a crossroads. One path leads to despair and utter hopelessness, the other to total extinction. Let us pray that we have the wisdom to choose correctly.

I'm very proud of my gold pocket watch. My grandfather, on his deathbed, sold me this watch.

I don't think my parents liked me. They put a live teddy bear in my crib.

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Woody Allen makes careful selections of the music that plays on his films sountracks. And he likes a wide variety of jazz!

Another great soundtrack was the one for 'Husbands and Wives'. Not my preferred Allen film but while watching it you could listen to Leo Reisman's 'What Is This Thing Called Love?' (with the trumpet of Bubbey Miley well featured), Wes Montgomery's 'West Coast Blues' and 'That Old Feeling' by Stan Getz and Gerry Mulligan, and more...

Right point!

Not knowing what was name of the film, who except Allen in the world will use Teddy Wilson for background music (soundtrack).

Very nice indeed!

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Right point!

Not knowing what was name of the film, who except Allen in the world will use Teddy Wilson for background music (soundtrack).

Very nice indeed!

Anything else

anything_elseposter.thumb.jpg

Easy to Love

Written by Cole Porter

Performed by Billie Holiday & Teddy Wilson & his Orchestra

Courtesy of Columbia Records

The Way You Look Tonight

Written by Dorothy Fields & Jerome Kern

Performed by Billie Holiday & Teddy Wilson & his Orchestra

Courtesy of Columbia Records

I Can't Believe That You're in Love with Me

Written by Clarence Gaskill & Jimmy McHugh

Performed by Billie Holiday & Teddy Wilson & his Orchestra

Courtesy of Columbia Records

Honeysuckle Rose

Written by Andy Razaf & Thomas 'Fats' Waller

Performed by Teddy Wilson

Courtesy of Columbia Records

:w

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showin my age :P

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex * But Were Afraid to Ask

woody 1972

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