7/4

The guitar corner

1,925 posts in this topic

if you wanna see what the great Joe Baiza, whom Nels mentions there and reveres, does with his Jazzmaster--

get 'past' the song if necessary; note the key Django influence too, among others.

Interesting little chat/demo video with Nels Cline.

Nels Cline Plays His 1959 Jazzmaster

Edited by MomsMobley

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Well, I hate youtube but I watched a bit of it. Wound that sound up! (Music didn't do much for me). Jazzmasters are so cool. Mine has been great ever since Shawn did a setup on it for me a few years ago. I need to put it back on a guitar stand, I've been playing my mahogany Stratocaster Deluxe most often of late, it's such a dark bluesy beast that it sucks me in.

Edited by jazzbo

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Can I ask for some help on some chord conversions with a capo?

With the capo on the second fret, what are the equivalents for C#m and Bm?

Thanks in advance!

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Can I ask for some help on some chord conversions with a capo?

With the capo on the second fret, what are the equivalents for C#m and Bm?

Thanks in advance!

I don't know if I am interpreting the the question properly, but putting a capo on the second fret just moves everything up a full step. So playing an open Am chord will now be Bm. Playing an open Bm chord will now be C#m.

Edited by John L

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Thanks John. I'm actually more confused now but I think I figured it out.

The capo on the second-fret chord progression on the verse is:

A - D

A - D

A - E

With no capo, its:

B - E

B - E

B - F#

I was asking about the equivalent chords on a transitional line between chorus and verse, which was skipped on the no-capo tab.

The capo'd version is:

D - C#m - Bm

Following the above, I tried:

E - Dm - Cm

and it sounds right to me. :)

Normally if I had a capo'd tab that was simple as this one is, I'd just go for that but its a measure of my improvement that I'm able to play, pretty decently, the tougher chords. Makes me want to work it until I really get it down.

Even if it is "Sweet Caroline". :g

Edited by Dan Gould

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Okay, I've been fiscally reckless and spent money from savings I shouldn't have this year, but I finally really know what I want in a guitar and have been able to really get guitars I can't stop playing. . . .

I boutht a Phil Gawen (Phiga) Stephen Cripe "Lightning Bolt" copy as the Irwin and Cripe guitars are always fascinating to me. The "Lightning Bolt" was a steal, beautiful wood and excellent craftsmanship, fantastic playability and sound. This got me thinking that what I've really wanted all along was a Doug Irwin "Wolf" style guitar.

So I did a lot of research and decided to try out a Troy Post model, he calls it the "GT" for "Garcia Tribute." This one is unlike the real Wolf as it has a bolt on neck (maple with a rosewood fingerboard), and a simplified "sandwhich" body, but then it didn't cost even as much as an American Standard Fender Strat. I had him add Gotoh tuners, a brass nut, and the later Wolf complement of pickups, Dimarzio SDS-1 single coil and two Super 2 humbuckers. The humbuckers are coil tapped.

The body is black walnut with a poplar "binding layer." I think this damned thing is beautiful. And boy, is this an expressive guitar, real clarity and speed to the sound and lots of sustain. You can get the Garcia sonic world and also do a Santana thing, lots of sounds in this dog. It plays really well. I think it's beautiful and I haven't picked up another guitar since it arrived on Friday last.


$_57.JPG

Can't stop playing this guitar. It has a brighter, crisper sound than I'm used to but I'm making it work. Definitely captures the sound of the strings in the way that the real Wolf does on recordings I have (listened yesterday to one of the discs on the new Legion of Mary set and immediately heard the similarities). And it's got a great neck, it feels and the attack is a lot like my Fender American Deluxe Mahogany Strat, one of my favorite Strats, while sounding so different. It is an odd sensation of familiarity and exciting new.

Edited by jazzbo

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This is the Phiga "Bolt" that I bought, made by luthier Phil Gawen of Brownsville, Texas. Seven laminate neck through design. The top is Brazilian imbruia, the core is ash, the back is purpleheart, the neck is a laminate of flame maple, purpleheart and bloodwood, the pickups are Tesla. This is the easieset playing and most flexible sonically of any guitar I've owned. Truly an amazing piece of art. Not only that but the serial number is "08/04" and as my birthday is August 4, that's too cool.

post-83-0-26819800-1390569456_thumb.jpg

Edited by jazzbo

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That sounds like an awesome guitar, jazzbo! Garcia and Santana are among my main influences tonally, so I would really dig it, too! Post some recordings when you have a chance.

Edited by Jerry_L

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I don't do recordings so won't be posting any. But you would like this guitar. And you would love the "Bolt" by Phil Gawen, it's even more Garcia and Santana, and even more versatile. Worth checking out Troy's site: http://www.postguitars.com Also worth checking out Phil Gawen's site: http://www.philgawen.com/phigaguitars.htm I'd love to have another one of Phil's, the "Bolt" I have plays like no other guitar, and on top of that is just awe-inspiringly beautiful. I got an incredible deal on it, and it had sat in a case for nine years. . . otherwise I couldn't have afforded it.

Edited by jazzbo

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Congrats on the new acquisition, Lon! Looks like you got a real winner! Sometimes it's worth it to pay up for something you know will improve your joy of playing.

I was surprised at the prices of his guitars - MUCH more reasonably priced than I would have guessed considering the workmanship that obviously goes into each one.

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That's my thinking too, you can pay this much for an assembly line one from the majors made in America. And this guitar is on anohter level.

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All those pictures you've posted in the past years. How many guitars do you own. jb? Maybe you remember my bassplayer friend I was sitting next to. I think at that time he had 37 and his house is very small I can tell you. I think he sold a few when he wanted a specific one from N.Y. but he still has a lot. A pity you don't do recordings, I'd love to hear some of those sugars. If the coffee has a good taste, how 'bout it? ;)

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Here's mine:
post-23981-0-62681800-1390602862_thumb.j

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always good to have a classical guitar around. :party:

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Here's mine:

attachicon.gifpage's guitar-.jpg

Liefs page. That's a nice color!

I have about a dozen guitars and a half dozen basses. And two drum sets. And an electronic piano. And a contrabass violin.

And a kazoo.

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always good to have a classical guitar around. :party:

Ah, well maybe it is not impressive but it serves the purpose I have in mind as a jazz singer songwriter. :shrug[1]: Besides that, it was a gift from my brother.

Edited by page

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Here's mine:

attachicon.gifpage's guitar-.jpg

Liefs page. That's a nice color!

I have about a dozen guitars and a half dozen basses. And two drum sets. And an electronic piano. And a contrabass violin.

And a kazoo.

Wow, impressive. You play all of them? I have a kazoo too :) and a keyboard and several flutes ánd a C harmonica. I took a blues course a few months back. Yes, my guitar was made in Italy actually, it is quite pretty hey. I only plan to play acoustic. I played bass once too, only at a workshop where there were too many singers. I played Kiss, would you believe that, lol. I was made for loving you, baby!

Edited by page

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Really, you only need one guitar. It's sort of a sickness to have so many. I do make a point of playing them all at least once in a while, though I have about four guitars and two basses that I mostly play. I haven't set the drumsets up since I moved; I have an apartment now and no time to play them anyway, and no one to play them with (they're not solo instruments).

I've probably said this to you before, playing is like a meditation to me, and I like to explore sound and textures and use the instrument to sort of draw myself out of myself. In my new place I'm playing a lot more because. .. well, the only real free time I have is on weekday afternoons and there are no neighbors at that time, so I'm much less self-conscious, and I'm also feeling blue and expressing that musically is therapeutic, and I have no one else to spend time with.

I can imagine you playing bass page, it made me smile. :D

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Each gtr should serve a different purpose, then it makes sense!

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I've got a friend who owns a mastering studio and also tours 30-40 weeks a year as soundman with a nationally known rock band. He collects guitars, but I didn't know the extent of his mania until recently. There are always half a dozen guitars in his studio, and another 10-15 in his living room and bedroom. He recently realized that I had never seen his guitar room, so he took me in. It was packed, and he told me that he has around 250 guitars. Most were in cases, but even this non-guitarist could tell that some of the visible ones were very cool. He does play, and I think about half a dozen are in rotation at any one time. I think the plan is to sell them off as he needs money in his old age. Anyway, it was very impressive and disturbing at the same time - kind of like some of our record collections, I guess.

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Haha..while not on that scale I have a friend who collects guitars too...he probably has around 25-30 right now. It's a bit crazy but as a record collector I can't really judge sanity ;)

I've played guitar for nearly 30 years and right now just have two main guitars...a Taylor 810 acoustic and a Hagstrom Super Swede reissue. I also have a cheap bass, 12 string acoustic, classical, a late 80s heavy metal looking Ibanez, and a super cheap made-in-Asia Fender squier stratocaster which I just bought for Terje Rypdal to autograph!

If I had more money I'd love to own a real Fender strat and a nice Gibson ES-335 or Les Paul...one day..that Bolt guitar looks pretty interesting jazzbo...

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Really, you only need one guitar. It's sort of a sickness to have so many. I do make a point of playing them all at least once in a while, though I have about four guitars and two basses that I mostly play. I haven't set the drumsets up since I moved; I have an apartment now and no time to play them anyway, and no one to play them with (they're not solo instruments).

I've probably said this to you before, playing is like a meditation to me, and I like to explore sound and textures and use the instrument to sort of draw myself out of myself. In my new place I'm playing a lot more because. .. well, the only real free time I have is on weekday afternoons and there are no neighbors at that time, so I'm much less self-conscious, and I'm also feeling blue and expressing that musically is therapeutic, and I have no one else to spend time with.

I can imagine you playing bass page, it made me smile. :D

Yes, I remember and I understand. It is sort of similiar for me with my singing and writing. My first or main reason is to express myself, let what is inside come to the surface that way. Music is a loyal companion, one you can count on. So it can be happy with you or lonely with you or what ever state of mind you have. For me that's kind of reassuring. I'll always trust on this to be able to be honest, with myself as well as with others. Kind of therapeutic, yes, fun too though. :)

I can't really play bass of course. It was just that none of the other singers played instruments and since I played some guitar the host of the workshop planned me for the bass. I only learned a few pop/rocksongs. The Kiss song was actually a tough one and the guitarist took part of the original bass part over from me since it would be too much for a beginner like me. I've always liked the bass as an instrument, especially the double bass which has something magical, but electric basses as well. The sound is sweet and low, I like that.

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I like that "sweet and lowdown" sound too, and I spent years as a drummer, so the bass is fascinating to me as the "partner" to what I used to do. Hard on my fingers though, which are starting to be a bit arthritic. ;(

Edited by jazzbo

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always good to have a classical guitar around. :party:

Ah, well maybe it is not impressive but it serves the purpose I have in mind as a jazz singer songwriter. :shrug[1]: Besides that, it was a gift from my brother.

It's a quiet instrument, I like that. Mine has a real wide fingerboard, which makes it a bit hard to play. But I keep it simple, not the instrument I'd be playing scales on anyway.

I'm not a classically trained, the jazz chord/melody thing works well on it. I have a Godin La Patrie Concert, got it a few years ago for $400.

I don't play it too often, but I just tuned it up and I think it will get some play this weekend. I haven't been playing too much gtr, rediscovering piano (synth) since the holidays.

Edited by 7/4

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