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Hardbopjazz

Hard Bop

62 posts in this topic

as I recall I didn't like it, spent to much time correcting, in my head, his mistakes - but it's been quite a while since I read it -

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I have and enjoyed it a lot. Others may disagree, but I found it informative. Nice discussion of Andrew Hill, which is the only one that I am aware of in a book.

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I agree with both Ronald and Allen :)

It is very well written, and has brief yet interesting discussions.

The errors are annoying though - Lee Morgan died in February '72, not January, and he mispells Frank Wolff throughout.

Bertrand.

Edited by bertrand

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A great primer, though, yes, there are some factual errors--but let's not be too hard on the guy as the MS was published posthumously. A few omissions are odd (Hank Mobley & Grant Green) but by & large it's a very good introduction to the music with an informed list of recommended recordings at the back.

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I haven't read in a decade or more, but it's nice to know that this is back in print. By general recollection, I agree with previous comments: flawed, but better trhan nothing (and, particularly, better than anything else available at time of original publication).

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I found it very helpful and a good read. I didn't know enough at the time to say it was flawed so I'll defer to others on that point.

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Let's not cut too much slack - a number of the pieces were previously published elsewhere. I recall some in Keyboard magazine and the book notes five other places where articles appeared earlier.

Mike

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Since people seem to be ringing in with useless posts - never read it.

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Since people seem to be ringing in with useless posts - never read it.

:g

read it. liked it. kept it.

;)

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So, does that mean: "never read it" - that you've never read it, or: "never read it" - one should never read it?

Mike

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So, does that mean: "never read it" - that you've never read it, or: "never read it" - one should never read it?

Mike

It's a quiz. Nothing if you get it right - worse if you miss.

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Bought it, skimmed it a few times, saw nothing particularly compelling and/or informative, and place it on the bottom of the "to get to later" pile.

It's still there.

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I picked it up in the store, scanned it, put it back.

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I read the library's copy when I was just getting started with jazz; it helped fan the flame, so I can't complain. In all honesty, though, sometimes reading a book about jazz seems to be a lot like singing a song about e. e. cummings. It's interesting that you can do such a thing, but...

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I picked it up in the store, scanned it, put it back.

I did steps 1 & 2 , but bought it.

Then again, it was in a remainder bin for under $5, I'd already had lunch.

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In all honesty, though, sometimes reading a book about jazz seems to be a lot like singing a song about e. e. cummings.

Dancing about architecture?

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IMHO its an excellent book. It introduced me to artists I had barely heard of and has an excellent section on Tina Brooks. I was also impressed by his assessment of the importance of heroin and its relevance to need of black artists to "distance" themselves. Its a book I go back to. Well worth restrieving from the remainder bin.

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In all honesty, though, sometimes reading a book about jazz seems to be a lot like singing a song about e. e. cummings.

Dancing about architecture?

If I could put a stake through that quote's heart (& also Zappa's "smells funny" quote) I would.

If anyone has a spare copy of the Rosenthal they'd like to dispose of tell me as my sister's looking for it & it's o/p.

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It seems to be a big thumbs down here for the book. Decided to pcik up

Cookin': Hard Bop and Soul Jazz, 1954-65 and

Giant Steps: The Story of Bebop

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Edited by Hardbopjazz

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If anyone has a spare copy of the Rosenthal they'd like to dispose of tell me as my sister's looking for it & it's o/p.

Copies are available at half.com & amazon.

Lowest price seems to be around $8 + shipping.

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saw it. bought it. took it to dinner. bought it flowers. took it home. married it. had children with it. divorced it. now only visit it on weekends.

Edited by AllenLowe

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Rosenthal's book is much better than the two you bought, hardbopjazz.

Bertrand.

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Rosenthal's book is much better than the two you bought, hardbopjazz.

Bertrand.

I agree, if the Rosenthal's a so-so, those two books are a no-no in my opinion.

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