MartyJazz

BFT #28 - Disc One: DISCUSSION

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:( -oh what the heck - i decided to post my horrible guesses anyway. don't laugh (too hard). :P

BFT#28

Well, here are my guesses and they are just that! Thanks Marty for a terrific BFT!!!

1 - Sounds like Bechet to me. I love the number – SNAPPY!!

2 - Perhaps Getz or Desmond? Has a Spanish feel to it which I like!

3 - Who is playing that piano? Is it Jamal? Good stuff!

4 - Barney Kessel?

5 - No idea, but nice. Perhaps Kenny Dorham on trumpet?

6 - Love that big band sound! Is it Duke?

7 - Help??!!!

8 - More big band!!!

9 - Milt Jackson? MJQ?

10 - Me like!!!!

11 - Lee Morgan? Oh, I am not very good at this!

12 – Hmmmmmmmmm?

13 – don’t know.

14 – don’t know

15 – This REALLY swings!!! I DIG it!!!

16 – 18 - don’t know

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I started making some notes at the house; took the discs to work, and left them there. So here's what I've got so far:

This BFT is so enjoyable, it makes me forget how badly these all have me stumped!

Glad you find it a joy to listen to. Some of the answers will surprise you when you either wait for me to post them or look at some earlier posts, but I could understand what was behind your guesses in quite a few instances. You made a good start on track #7 but then digressed elsewhere. Thanks very much for your input. I was looking forward to your comments and hope to see some more re the rest of the disc.

Oh, I am enjoying this disc! Quite a bit! This BFT is one I’ll be returning to long after the guessing and answers have come and gone.

Well, track 7 is my favorite of the bunch so far, so I’m gonna keep guessing on this one. So it’s not a Heath date (doesn’t matter; I need to get those sextet dates anyway!). If it’s a Tadd Dameron arranged date for Riverside, wonder which one it is? It’s not the Milt Jackson date, nor is it Tadd’s own date. A Riverside date, though: like I said, it has that “sound,” which I really dig.

I’m gonna keep monitoring the answers on this one!

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Oh, I am enjoying this disc! Quite a bit! This BFT is one I’ll be returning to long after the guessing and answers have come and gone.

Well, track 7 is my favorite of the bunch so far, so I’m gonna keep guessing on this one. So it’s not a Heath date (doesn’t matter; I need to get those sextet dates anyway!). If it’s a Tadd Dameron arranged date for Riverside, wonder which one it is? It’s not the Milt Jackson date, nor is it Tadd’s own date. A Riverside date, though: like I said, it has that “sound,” which I really dig.

I’m gonna keep monitoring the answers on this one!

Really glad you dug #7. Beautiful trumpet and IMO, a terrific tenor solo. Mustn't say more otherwise I'll be giving it away.

In any event, I like also that you'll be returning to this BFT - that was a goal in creating it, that it could "survive" for some after the answers are posted.

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The rest of the story!

Track 10: Sounds like a Gerry Mulligan arrangement with him on bari (THAT is unmistakable!), maybe Konitz on alto. Seems like I’ve heard this one before; sure wish I could place it! But who is that going nuts on the drums? Philly Joe? Or maybe another Art Taylor beat? Nice swing on this one!

Track 11: Now THAT sounds like Donald Byrd, backed by Philly Joe. No wait! I wonder if this is that Miles Davis Quartet with Oscar Pettiford on bass, Philly Joe on drums, and I forget who on piano (could probably look it up, may do so later).

Track 12: AbsoLUTEly no clue!!! A little too meandering for me. Sounds like it wants to be like Out to Lunch. Ah well. NEXT!!!

Track 13: What, another Basie band track? ‘salright with me!!! :tup Lester on tenor? Maybe it’s one of his Aladdin small groups.

Track 14: That octave jump is grating on my nerves, for some reason. Sounds pretty recent; either that, or it is a phenomenally good recording! Don’t recognize anyone off the bat. Waaaaait a second: in my usual ignorance, I’ve not paid attention to the piano, and how it drops out a lot during solos, and how that octave-jump is SO Monk! I’ll bet this is from 5 by Monk by 5.

Track 15: AH HA!!!! Finally!!! A track I know!!! And the only reason I know it is because I happened to be listening to this collection a bunch the last few weeks. Otherwise, I’d be whining about how I should know this but don’t; you know, like all the rest of my answers! Fats & Howard doin’ some double talkin’! For my money, that trumpet duel at the end is hotter than anything this side of a Roy & Diz duel; it’s also probably the ONLY time you’d ever forget Sonny was on a record (his 70’s Milestone stuff notwithstanding)!

Track 16: This sounds like a Benny Goodman band in the mid-40’s or so. I love this kind of writing! Are you trying to pull the same stunt I tried to pull on my BFT (a Goodman track without a Goodman solo)? If so, it worked! :g Oop, wait a sec: there IS a clarinet solo. Whatever! Still a wonderful track! Can’t wait to find out the answer to this one!

Track 17: AAAARGH!!! Another trumpet/bari combo! I love it! But I can’t keep guessing Byrd/Adams alla time. And yet, THIS sounds like THEM all the way. OH! OH! OH!!!! I bet I know dis one, bossa: it’s that Johnny Griffin-led date on Riverside, with.... (Philly Joe drum roll, please) Byrd and Adams!!! Woo hoo! Let me bask in my knowledge for just a moment until I actually go back and read the answers! ;)

Track 18: The writing for the horns doesn’t do much for me at first, but on a groove like this, WHO CARES?!?!? That piano is killin’!!! Sounds like Teddy Wilson on uppers! That trombone sounds completely unfamiliar, which means it ain’t the usual suspects (JJ, Kai, Curtis, even Fred (Anderson or Wesley)). Who’s that alto tryin’ to sound like Jackie McLean? Can’t wait to find out the answer to this one!

My GOD this was a fun disc!!! Haven’t had this much fun with a BFT since mmilovan’s disc (#20). I’m gonna do some searching to see if some of my guesses were right (11, 14, & 17, f’rinstance); then I’m just gonna spend some time just listening and enjoying. Thanks again for a fantastic listening experience, Marty! :tup:tup :tup :tup

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I really dig all the answers I'm getting and the absolute certainty with which some state their guesses however wrong. "A" for courage all around. Better to play and be wrong than to sit back and say, "I'm glad I didn't say that".

In any event, Big Al, congrats on #15, and as for the last three you want to know, you'll find the answers to two of them above. #17 however remains a mystery thus far.

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5: Oh! I know this. What is it? Oh yeah… it's from this album. Excellent album. Good compositions and fine soloing all round.

Off to Barnes & Noble for this one!

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I really dig all the answers I'm getting and the absolute certainty with which some state their guesses however wrong.  "A" for courage all around.  Better to play and be wrong than to sit back and say, "I'm glad I didn't say that". 

In any event, Big Al, congrats on #15, and as for the last three you want to know, you'll find the answers to two of them above.  #17 however remains a mystery thus far.

Yep, and I see I was wrong on all three counts! Ah well, this BFT's probably gonna break me anyway, so at least I have time to save up for the answers!

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This was one of my worst efforts at guessing in a few tests. I really enjoyed listening to this disc! Great selections.

Disc 1

1. I'm not familiar with this era at all. Great track, I really enjoy this one and would like to hear more from this band.

2. This sounds like something Ellington would write, but I couldn’t tell you what album this track is from. Nice. Another one I’d like to hear.

3. This one is driving me crazy. I swear I’ve heard this, or something very similar, before. I’m not coming up with an identification, though. Another nice one.

4. This sounds a lot like Django, but the track seems too modern to actually be him. Very nice!

5. This sounds like a Horace Silver group to me. I like the baritone here a lot. No clue who this is, but I’m really enjoying this track. Another one to add to the “to buy” list.

6. No clue.

7. Again, no clue, but this one sounds somewhat familiar. Very nice.

8. Not an era I am very familiar with. The second(?) trumpet player’s high tone isn’t something I’d want to hear too often. Not my cup of tea.

9. Very nice track! No clue who this is. I’m not too familiar with vibists, and whoever this is doesn’t sound like anyone I have heard before. I’d like to hear the rest of this album.

10. A nice enough tune, but I’ve got nothing to go with here.

11. I’m going to kick myself when I read who this is. Great tune, and I know I have heard the trumpet before.

12. After reading about this album for years I finally bought a copy not too long ago. Not as fiery as I had expected, given the title, but this track, especially, bring the Bird home to roost.

13. No clue.

14. Someone very Monk influenced. I don’t have enough to go on to guess any names. This track is nice enough that I’d like to hear more by the band, but not so captivating that I’d go out of my way to do so. It feels a little too derivative.

15. No clue who this is, but a very, very nice track. The playing sounds more modern than the fidelity would indicate, so I’ll guess this is something from the late ‘40’s / early ‘50’s.

16. Nice tune, but the cornet(?) is played so shrill and high that I find it grating and a bit distracting. Other than that, I like the tune. No clue who it is, however.

17. Much better! And another baritone…perhaps a mini theme? I’m not able to name anyone, however. Another disc to add to the “must buy” list.

18. One of my favorite tracks so far! Great energy. This track almost sounds like something the ICP would come up with. A very Dutch sense of humor comes through, but this doesn’t sound Dutch to my ears. Great track!

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Martin, this is a terrific compilation! I did not take any notes, and don't know if I'll have time for a thorough listen with taking any notes, so let me say thank you very much!

Some things sounded familiar, some not, but all in all I didn't recognize that much... do I hear Fat Girl and Maggie trading some on #15, with Ernie Henry on alto and Bags on piano? Love that Navarro/Dameron Blue Note set!!! This is "Double Talk" (master take).

Otherwise... as I said, I enjoyed the CD immensely and look forward to hearing disc 2, and if I get a chance to listen again within useful time, I'll post more about it (I haven't read one word of this thread, and I'll keep out again after I have posted this!)

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Martin, this is a terrific compilation! I did not take any notes, and don't know if I'll have time for a thorough listen with taking any notes, so let me say thank you very much!

Some things sounded familiar, some not, but all in all I didn't recognize that much... do I hear Fat Girl and Maggie trading some on #15, with Ernie Henry on alto and Bags on piano? Love that Navarro/Dameron Blue Note set!!! This is "Double Talk" (master take).

Otherwise... as I said, I enjoyed the CD immensely and look forward to hearing disc 2, and if I get a chance to listen again within useful time, I'll post more about it (I haven't read one word of this thread, and I'll keep out again after I have posted this!)

Thanks for the good word and would really like to hear more detail from you if time allows. Join the gang on #15, that one seems to have been a freebie for most who hear it as well as it should be. A classic!

Later,

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I can't stand it any more. I keep getting notices that people are posting to the discussions and I won't let myself look until I make at least a small contribution. And small it will be. Confused, too. With reason: This is the year of the Attack Chickens, and if you live where such views have currency, it's a reality -- it's a year of endless unfinished undertakings, bedeviled by annoyances that come on like viciously pecking chickens. But enough of the excuses . . .

disc one

Start to finish, this is a super fine disc, Marty. One excellent cut after another. Pure pleasure. Makes me feel all the more guilty for being slow to say anything and for the very disorganized post I'm about to write. I put the disc in the CD changer along with a few of my own on Sunday afternoon, as I set about a massive reorganization of about 1.5 TB worth of hard drives. Both the listening and the HD project got quite jumbled. I was pretty orderly with the first four tracks -- not taking notes but remembering. Then I got distracted and soon couldn't tell if I was listening to the BFT or my own CDs. I wound up with a cloud of impressions, no sense of which track was which, and no notes. Since then I've listened this week during commutes, each time with as much enjoyment as the first but still without keeping track of the tracks (couldn't see the numbers with sunglasses on). With that as background, here goes:

.... but not yet. With each one of these selections, I had the sense that the music took precedence over anyone's urge to push himself into the listener's attention. This was most notable with the trumpets. I often find brass to be too in-your-face for me to enjoy it fully. Here there was none of that. The trumpets were there as much for the music as for someone's self-promotion.

01 First notes into this piece I think I hear Sidney Bechet, but no it's not. This one quickly sounds increasingly refined in a dukish sort of way. Barney Bigard instead of Bechet? Very likely.

02 I'm virtually certain I have this one on the shelf somewhere but I can't identify it. It has me thinking not necessarily of who's playing here but of all the musicians who aren't considered super-superstars but are/were consummate artists. My mind drifts off to Pepper Adams, Booker Little, Mel Lewis, Phineas Newborn, Shorty Rogers, Shelly Manne and on and on.

03 Echoes of Bud. Who, who? Very familiar. Frustrating not to be able to come up with a name. The Bud influence. Ah, Elmo Hope? Maybe, but maybe not. Bud, bud. "Blues for Bud." Hampton Hawes?

04 Amazing stuff here. With few exceptions there's not much of electric guitar I really like beyond the 40s swing tradition. This is wonderful. It has some of the relaxed feel of a Nat Cole trio, but there's more adventure and a more robust swing and even a Django-like, gypsy tang.

05 and onward. Here it all starts to run together. I have a bunch of itty-bitty post-it's with various names scrawled. Don't know which goes with which track:

Kenny Dorham / Cecil Payne / Teddy Charles -- a third stream piece with Giuffre? / Brownie?!!! w/ J.J. Johnson, Tadd Dameron? / Basie with Lucky? / another Basie-ish piece -- with Buck and Buddy? / Mulligan, no, maybe Serge Chaloff, no, it's Mulligan / Fats Navarro / what's that Monk-like thing? -- very credible in places -- might even be one of those larger group Monk things, although I doubt it / more vibes - more Teddy Charles? probably not - who else? Lem Winchester? / Artie Shaw -- later stuff, laid back -- sounds different in the context of this CD

last track: Wow, what was that?!! Caught me off guard. Blew past me before I knew what was happening -- must listen again just to this one.

This is all great stuff. I'll be listening again. And what I don't have, I want. Thanks, Marty. This is refreshing my appreciation of musicians and albums I haven't played for a while. What a fine gift!

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Alright! I NEEED to know who track 8 is. That buildup at the end, vamping on the one note, DAMN I love that!!!!! I see no one has guessed. I also see that brownie hasn’t checked in either. BROWNIE!!! Get yer butt in here and set us straight!!!

Also, I’d like to thank y’all for not pointing out that the reason the players on track 15 could make you forget Sonny Rollins is on there is because...... well, he ain’t!

D’OH!!!! :winky:

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Just checking in to say that I've been spinning disc 1 all week in my office, with disc 2 playing in the car. Some really nice stuff here; i'm enjoying the discs a bunch. But damn, I'm stumped. I recognize a few tunes, but have no good guesses in mind for artists. Hope to post some answers this weekend.

Thanks again, Marty!

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Ok, been out all day. In order:

Indigo,

Love your jumbled bunch of names at the end of your post. Some right on, some not.

Big Al:

Yeah, I love that piece too and that fantastic build up at the end, which is why I programmed it I guess. D'oh! If anyone will get it, I'm afraid it'll be brownie. And yeah, I guess I was kind enuf not to point out the absence of Sonny on #15.

RDK:

You prewarned me that you'd be pressed timewise, so I'm glad you're getting a chance to listen. Great to have an office where you can do so. The car is the best though 'cause you're in a sealed compartment with the sounds enveloping you; the only thing that can interrupt, should you let it, is the cell phone. Look forward to your comments if you can.

Thanks to one and all for the :tup on the disc.

Edited by MartyJazz

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Sorry I'm late getting in. Hands on my time, as it were, but it's been on my mind. Have had a chance to give the disc one or two semi-good listenings and a few casual ones, but no in-depth listens until now.

A very enjoyable compilation - some familiar voices in unfamiliar (or vaguely familiar) settings. Neat stuff! The usual thanks and disclaimers are firmly in place, as always.

TRACK ONE - Can't say with any certainty, but the trombonist's vibrato and phrasing remind of Lawrence Brown at times, and the growl trumpet sure could be early Cootie (or maybe even Miley). Less sure about the clarinetist. Not a full big band, obviously, so my guess is some item of Ellingtonia. Wish I knew more of this period and these type items. Some day...Killer groove, though, with the saxes on the upbeats presaging the faster shuffles of Prima/Butera. It ROCKS! Very enjoyable, and they pack a lot of "events" into a mere 2:50. Not even pop records are that short anymore!

TRACK TWO - Freakin' beautiful tune. Recognized KD, Pepper, & Billy. Recognized the tenorist's vocabulary but not tone, so started doing an AMG search and guessed right the first time. Not a common occurance I assure you! But appropriate, given the TITLE of this album. The opening of the piano solo then fell into place as a stylistic offshoot of the one this same player offered on a big BN hit record. Lovely cut, and an album I've slept on over the years. Groovy, especially hearing that cat on tenor. Thanks for the wakeup call!

TRACK THREE - Sounds very familiar...Roy on drums? Maybe not...Recording quality sounds "European" to me...Sounds too familiar, but damn if i can pin it down right now. Mid/late 60s, kind of a "Now He Sings..." vibe is spots, but only in spots. Oh well... Very hip, and I'm gonna kick myself when I find out who it is.

TRACK FOUR - Some OP thing? That guitarist is WACK! I hear a Django influence... Tiny Grimes? (how's that for a non-sequiter?) No idea, very much of its time, but in a good way.

TRACK FIVE - Almost sounds like it could be from the same session as Track 3, only with horns added...Could be Charles Davis on bari, tone suggests him, but not the intonation. Trumpet suggests Donald Byrd, but not totally. Tenor sounds like either Tubby Hayes or Ronny Scott, with a moment of Clifford Jordan at the end of the solo... Again, very nice stuff. No bullshit here!

TRACK SIX - Hmmmm...I get visions of Danny Kaye for some reason, playing an eccentric pianist who gets a chance to sit in with a name band, and then doing his schtick from there, replete with cutesy faces and creepy body language. Not necessarily the most pleasant of images...

Very nice lead alto work, though, sounds like Marshall Royal. Hell, the whole sax section sounds great. Sounds like a Swing band flirting with some very early "modern" concpets. But the flirting is for naught, I'm afraid.

TRACK SEVEN - at last, a Van Gelder recording! Dameron-esque, fersure. Donald Byrd on trumpet, I believe, sounding a bit fatigued, but with good ideas. Now hey, THAT'S Sam Rivers, unmistakably, and that would make this a cut from THIS bad boy! Got it, have listened to it a few times, but not enough for the material to be instantly recognizable. Gotta love this one. Tadd's stuff was always so nice.

TRACK EIGHT - No Danny Kaye here! That drummer's kickin', jack! Pianist plays the kind of games that Hines plays. Can't make an educated guess, unfortunately, other than to say that this is some BAAAAAADDDD shit! Great writing (especially towards the end. that's some hip shit right there), great playing, swings like a mofo, totally natural, not in the least bit forced. YEAH!

TRACK NINE - singing vibist, must(?) be Dave Pike. Don't know anything by him other than The Doors of Perception. Not much to this one, just a vamp, but hey, it works. And it speeds up. A lot of the lines remind me a lot of Walt Dickerson, which is not what I would associate with the "image" I have of Dave Pike. Sounds like it might be a Rudy Recording also, and ditto. So maybe it's not Dave Pike. Maybe it's Walt Dicekrson. But I've never heard Dickerson sing while he plays. Ok, I'm curious. let me hunt.

a-HA!!!

Do second guesses count? :g

What a great player! (soemthing else I don't readily associate with Dave Pike!)

TRACK TEN - Sax Section! "Four Half-Brothers" or some such, if you know what I mean. At first I thought the bari was Challoff from his later years, but I don't know of him doing a date like this with alto. Too boppy to be Mulligan (but maybe not, becasue the boppishness is short-lived...). This kind of alto playing is good for me in small doses, and the size of this one is just about right. TAKEABREATHORDOSOMETHINGTOPUTSOMESPACEINYERLINESFERCRISSAKES! Digging the drummer and pianist the most. The drummer sounds like a ringer, if you know what I mean. Sounds like an interesting enough date.

TRACK ELEVEN - Nice. Very nice. Tightly casual. Blue Mitchell? The backing trio is everything you could ask for for this type thing. The bass is on a different channel than most of the other pieces so far, and it's discombobulating me! (listening on headphones right now...) Wynton Kelly, I think, and PC. Don't know, but this is as organic as this type thing gets.

TRACK TWELVE - YEAH! It's still changes, it's still bop, and it's still in time, but it's not rigid and hung up in some perverse repressive time warp prison. Absofukkinlutely beautiful. Them altoists sound familiar, might be Lasha & Simmons, but don't hold me to that. If this is off Firebirds, it might be just the nudge I need to get of my duff and finally get it. No good reason not to have it, especially after all these years of knowing that I should have it.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Basie, I hope. Wardell, I hope. A second tenor, I hope. Not wholy "Wholly Cats", I hope. I much dig Wardell. the other tenor is familiar and cool as well, but I much dig Wardell. Always.

TRACK FOURTEEN - Another one of those "Monk In The Sunshine" type things. This is a good'un, pastiche piano solo and all. I like the changes of the bridge. Like to see how the chart was written for the last four of that bridge. Sounds like two bars of 3, a bar of 2, then two of 4. Still sixteen beats, but...

TRACK FIFTEEN - 'Nuff said! Except that there's not enough Ernie Henry on record.

TRACK SIXTEEN - Sounds like a Ralph Burns piece for the First Herd, but not one that I know (but should). Very nice, if a little fussy and/or cutesy here and there. Then again, the writing sounds like it could be the work Eddie Sauter. But the use of electric guitar as a melodic instrument (Billy Bauer?) and the clarinetist's tone shift it to Herman for me, and therefore Burns. At the end of the day, it's one for the dance book, but hell, who says you can't dance to advanced writing? And this is pretty advanced writing in more than a few spots. Nice!

TRACK SEVENTEEN - another "European" sounding recording. Somebody who's been checking out Booker on tenor. Sounds like Woody Shaw on trumpet. Is this one of the Nathan Davis/Shaw things? Not the one w/Larry Yooung on piano, but the other one? Very nice. Nathan Davis was sure playing!

TRACK EIGHTEEN - Sounds like something by Jaki Byard or Dave Burrell. Oh yeah, it's this. Missed out on this one until just a few years ago. My loss. The pianist/drummer collaboration would go on to yield marvellous results in the folowing decade. Interesting to hear them doing a precursor to it in 1966.

Well, wow. Eighteen tracks, that's a lot! And other than #6, none that I'd mind hearing from here on out. Cool!

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Jack's nailing of #16 has me wanting to know A) how much more writing Sauter did for Shaw? B)What year was this? C)Who was the guitarist? and D)Where can I get this?

I'll wait for the answer thread, of course, but please include this information!

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Very nice.

1. Artie Shaw? I wavered toward Duke, then back.

2. Donald Byrd with Pepper Adams?

3. There was something very familiar about the style here. I'm thinking it's Hamp Hawes, although Herbie Hancock ran through my mind too.

4. A guitar with an edgy musical showmanship, but rooted in bop. Jimmy Bruno?

5. Kenny Dorham with Cecil Payne?

6. Count Basie?

7. Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers?

8. Earl Hines?

9. Sounds like early Walt Dickerson.

10. This might be my tenth Jones-Lewis Big Band guess without getting one right! Is that a record?

11. Miles?

12. Is this Dolphy from Out to Lunch?

13. Is this a Duke Ellington small group?

14. Monk?

15. Nice trumpet battle, could be JATP. I'll guess Fats Navarro is one of them.

16. Seems like kind of a classic swing band ensemble sound. Maybe a Cootie Williams big band?

17. Marty digs the booting sound of the bari sax and I say hell yeah. Might be the tenorists date. Lockjaw?

18. Sounds post hardbop with just the slightest touch of out. Kind of like Thomas Chapin's Arabesque dates.

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I promised Marty to post answers today. Wish I had had more time to dig into this for more answers. But time is running short and this compilation is a massive one!

But first congratulations to this BFT Master. Loved all the tracks and I know I will be searching for more albums.

1 - The unmistakable alliance of the valvetrombone player and the clarinetistl open this Blindfold Test and this is Heaven, or almost. The two were as much a natural match as Lawrence Brown and Johnny Hodges. The piano player remains in background excedt for a short signature at the very end:Track 20 (not the first version of this tune):

Ellingtonia

2- The sound of the trumpet player (a top favorite of mine) had me searching for the album. Could not put a name on the tenor player but the baritone player led me in the right direction. No wonder I could not recall the tenor player who is more often heard on alto.

Great support from the bass player (could not recall him showing a more pronounced influence from Wilbur Ware) and the drummer.

4th number from this album:

Bull's Eye

3- reminded me of Hampton Hawes in full flight but could not trace the disc. The drummer provides strong support throughout... Very nice!

4- the guitar player is instantly recognizable even if he switched to electronic guitar shortly befpre this was recorded. He played this magnificently andshows howsimple it was for him to make the transition to modern sounds. He is also helped by a first-rate rhythm section. Glad to see the paino player brought to the attention of the BFT listeners. He is way underrated.

Presidential tribute that is included in this recent reissue (but the sound that Marty got is much better :tup

Ike

5- I had played that album a few days ago (listed in the What Are You Listening thread). One of his best session but ti was the tenor player who had really impressed me.

Fourth tune from this album:

This one

6- A surprise! Really impressed with the piano player. More than by the band. A guess would be Mel Powell but then I don't recall having heard him play that farout. No idea about the band either. Can't recall having heard this before and I drew a blank on this one. I'll be looking for this when the results are to be posted!

7- This track was driving me nuts. Knew it was a Dameron signature (my guess is 'Choose Now' but that's not the version that was out on the Clifford Brown Memorial album. Also thought the tenor might be Benny Golson until I remembered this lost issue (it's the final tune from this lost date):

Tadd

This also as a reminder of how the trumpet player could PLAY!!

8- Another blank on that one.? Mary Lou Williams is the piano player I had in mind on this. Searched through the Andy Kirk Classics for an answer and failed. But this is a great stride piano introduction...And the trumpet duel makes me want to find out about this band

9- No doubt about the vibraphone player. Another great musician that is

sadly non-recorded

Fourth tune from his first album.

This Is

10 - Another outstanding music I have heard so often before because it was the theme song for a French radio jazz program. Often wondered where this music came from (beside kinowing it was a West Coast date).

Shelly Manne on drums, Bob Gordon or Jimmy Giuffre on baritone.

This one has eluded me for too long. Will simply wait for Marfty to tell me where it's from.

11 - Second appearance from the trumpet player who got credited as the banleader when this was reissued. Too bad the tenor player did not record mode. Another outstanding player, in the forgotten players list, right next to Tina!

Opening side from this reissue:

42nd St.

12- Bobby Hutcherson is here. Thought James Spaulding was along and thought this was from an Impulse gathering but could not locate the album (can't remember where I filed it!).

13 - Basie for sure! Or isn't it. Looked through the Basie discography to locate it and failed. Love this side and the two tenors

14 - This seems to be a BFT favorite. I am pretty sure it was included in another BFT. Love the trumpet player and that alto sax. Seventh tune:

Bleep

15 - A more than classic track. Outstanding trumpet players and another player on alto that is also way underrated. Tra

ck 26 from that album:

A classic

16 - Pretty interesting side but I could not trace that one...

17 - did not go very far with that one. Is that Hubbard on trumpet? Nice...

18 - Took me awhile to recognize this (well at least until the alto solo!. Should also have recognised the piano player from the first listening but did not! The tune could have gained from a tighter execution but it's really exciting music.

Tune 4 from this album:

Spooks

Had also a quick listen to disc 2 which is a bit less to my taste. Have only identified two tracks (7 and 9) so far and I am not sure I will be able to add more. Will give the disc a thorough listen pretty soon...

Edited by brownie

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Alright! I NEEED to know who track 8 is. That buildup at the end, vamping on the one note, DAMN I love that!!!!! I see no one has guessed. I also see that brownie hasn’t checked in either. BROWNIE!!! Get yer butt in here and set us straight!!!

Love that track too but who do you think I am? A computer :excited: ?

I'm just human :(

Thought this might be MaryLou and went through the Andy Kirk Classics (all four of them) and could not find a matcher! I give up and will wait for the final results to be announced :g

I just went through the various answers and see that Steojack nailed that track 6. What a brilliant pianist that was!

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Just got to my PC now and see that after a bit of a lull, I'm rewarded with some great feedback beginning with Jim S.

TRACK TWO - Freakin' beautiful tune. Recognized KD, Pepper, & Billy. Recognized the tenorist's vocabulary but not tone, so started doing an AMG search and guessed right the first time. Not a common occurance I assure you! But appropriate, given the TITLE of this album. The opening of the piano solo then fell into place as a stylistic offshoot of the one this same player offered on a big BN hit record. Lovely cut, and an album I've slept on over the years. Groovy, especially hearing that cat on tenor. Thanks for the wakeup call!

ME: You're very welcome and while this track was id'd early, you are the first to remark about the surprising appearance of the well known altoist on tenor. "Lovely cut" as you say for how often does one hear a jazz tango?

TRACK THREE - Sounds very familiar...Roy on drums? Maybe not...Recording quality sounds "European" to me...Sounds too familiar, but damn if i can pin it down right now. Mid/late 60s, kind of a "Now He Sings..." vibe is spots, but only in spots. Oh well... Very hip, and I'm gonna kick myself when I find out who it is.

ME: That's exactly what I thought when I first heard this track - late '60s acoustic Chick! Well, the date is correct, but the player (also id'd earlier) was around some time before he cut this.

TRACK FOUR - Some OP thing? That guitarist is WACK! I hear a Django influence... Tiny Grimes? (how's that for a non-sequiter?) No idea, very much of its time, but in a good way.

ME: Yeah, that Django "influence" :D again.

TRACK SIX - Hmmmm...I get visions of Danny Kaye for some reason, playing an eccentric pianist who gets a chance to sit in with a name band, and then doing his schtick from there, replete with cutesy faces and creepy body language. Not necessarily the most pleasant of images...

Very nice lead alto work, though, sounds like Marshall Royal. Hell, the whole sax section sounds great. Sounds like a Swing band flirting with some very early "modern" concpets. But the flirting is for naught, I'm afraid.

ME: Very interesting take on this piece. I think I'll wait until I post the answers before I say more.

TRACK SEVEN - at last, a Van Gelder recording! Dameron-esque, fersure. Donald Byrd on trumpet, I believe, sounding a bit fatigued, but with good ideas. Now hey, THAT'S Sam Rivers, unmistakably, and that would make this a cut from THIS bad boy! Got it, have listened to it a few times, but not enough for the material to be instantly recognizable. Gotta love this one. Tadd's stuff was always so nice.

ME: Finally, somebody and it figures it would be a tenor player himself, got Sam the Man and I don't mean Taylor! His "in" playing from this period is unmistakable even if the cut predates his first date as a leader by a couple of years. That tenor solo knocks me out every time.

TRACK EIGHT - No Danny Kaye here! That drummer's kickin', jack! Pianist plays the kind of games that Hines plays. Can't make an educated guess, unfortunately, other than to say that this is some BAAAAAADDDD shit! Great writing (especially towards the end. that's some hip shit right there), great playing, swings like a mofo, totally natural, not in the least bit forced. YEAH!

ME: Happy that this cut remains one of the few mysteries left on this disc (although I know Big Al is impatient to know). Mostly everyone (secor excluded) loves this one!

TRACK TEN - Sax Section! "Four Half-Brothers" or some such, if you know what I mean. At first I thought the bari was Challoff from his later years, but I don't know of him doing a date like this with alto. Too boppy to be Mulligan (but maybe not, becasue the boppishness is short-lived...). This kind of alto playing is good for me in small doses, and the size of this one is just about right. TAKEABREATHORDOSOMETHINGTOPUTSOMESPACEINYERLINESFERCRISSAKES!

ME: KEEPITUPCAUSEIDON'TMINDTHISKINDOFALTOPLAYINGWHATSOEVER!

TRACK TWELVE - YEAH! It's still changes, it's still bop, and it's still in time, but it's not rigid and hung up in some perverse repressive time warp prison. Absofukkinlutely beautiful. Them altoists sound familiar, might be Lasha & Simmons, but don't hold me to that. If this is off Firebirds, it might be just the nudge I need to get of my duff and finally get it. No good reason not to have it, especially after all these years of knowing that I should have it.

ME: Glad you're one of the few to dig this. Terrific early AVG date.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Basie, I hope. Wardell, I hope. A second tenor, I hope. Not wholy "Wholly Cats", I hope. I much dig Wardell. the other tenor is familiar and cool as well, but I much dig Wardell. Always.

ME: Surprise! The tenors have yet to be found. :)

TRACK SIXTEEN - Sounds like a Ralph Burns piece for the First Herd, but not one that I know (but should). Very nice, if a little fussy and/or cutesy here and there. Then again, the writing sounds like it could be the work Eddie Sauter. But the use of electric guitar as a melodic instrument (Billy Bauer?) and the clarinetist's tone shift it to Herman for me, and therefore Burns. At the end of the day, it's one for the dance book, but hell, who says you can't dance to advanced writing? And this is pretty advanced writing in more than a few spots. Nice!

ME: Right on re the arranger, but I think Woody would have been the first to say that he wished he could have played clarinet like that!

TRACK SEVENTEEN - another "European" sounding recording. Somebody who's been checking out Booker on tenor. Sounds like Woody Shaw on trumpet. Is this one of the Nathan Davis/Shaw things? Not the one w/Larry Yooung on piano, but the other one? Very nice. Nathan Davis was sure playing!

ME: How the hell you could tell this is a "European sounding recording", I don't know but you nailed it. Will give the details in my answers.

Very nice work, Jim, as I expected. Many thanks for the detailed itemization. :tup

Edited by MartyJazz

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Jack's nailing of #16 has me wanting to know A) how much more writing Sauter did for Shaw? B)What year was this? C)Who was the guitarist? and D)Where can I get this?

I'll wait for the answer thread, of course, but please include this information!

All your questions will be answered, I assure you.

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Very nice.

(snip)

3.  There was something very familiar about the style here.  I'm thinking it's Hamp Hawes, although Herbie Hancock ran through my mind too.

5. (snip) with Cecil Payne?

8.  Earl Hines?

9.  Sounds like early Walt Dickerson.

15.  Nice trumpet battle, (snip).  I'll guess Fats Navarro is one of them.

On the money with the above guesswork. Uh oh, we're on our way to solving the elusive track #8. Glad you jumped in Randy.

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I promised Marty to post answers today. Wish I had had more time to dig into this for more answers. But time is running short and this compilation is a massive one!

But first congratulations to this BFT Master. Loved all the tracks and I know I will be searching for more albums.

>>ME: I won't be posting the answers for another week or so at the earliest, so no rush necessary but I do appreciate your input.

>>ME: Except for #6, 8 & the leader on #10, you scored a very high passing grade on the first ten tracks as I knew you would, brownie

brownie:

11 - Second appearance from the trumpet player who got credited as the banleader when this was reissued. Too bad the tenor player did not record mode. Another outstanding player, in the forgotten players list, right next to Tina!

Opening side from this reissue:

42nd St.

>>ME: You're off on this one. Without even looking at your link, I know which record you're pointing to and the same blues piece is indeed on that record. BUT, one thing I made sure of on both BFTs is that no front line soloist (i.e., reeds or brass) is heard from more than once, not only on each disc but across both discs.

brownie:

13 - Basie for sure! Or isn't it. Looked through the Basie discography to locate it and failed. Love this side and the two tenors

>>ME: Yep, it's Basie, but who are those tenor players????!!!! I hope this one stays a mystery until answer time, but I have a feeling it won't.

brownie:

14 - This seems to be a BFT favorite. I am pretty sure it was included in another BFT. Love the trumpet player and that alto sax. Seventh tune:

Bleep

>>ME: One of the reasons I put together a BFT track list was to make sure there would be no duplication of any track from a prior BFT, so this is its first (and only I would hope) appearance on a BFT.

brownie

18 - Took me awhile to recognize this (well at least until the alto solo!. Should also have recognised the piano player from the first listening but did not! The tune could have gained from a tighter execution but it's really exciting music.

Tune 4 from this album:

Spooks

>>ME: Yes, the execution is less than precise, but would you prefer Wynton M. to have a go at this piece?

brownie:

Had also a quick listen to disc 2 which is a bit less to my taste. Have only identified two tracks (7 and 9) so far and I am not sure I will be able to add more. Will give the disc a thorough listen pretty soon...

>>ME: I'll remark on the differing reactions to these discs when I give my answers.

>>ME: Thanks so much for showing up, brownie. The wait was worth it!

Edited by MartyJazz

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So that's not Wardell on #13? Damn.

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Ahhh, the combined wisdom of JSngry and Brownie bring forth the light of a few choice answers. (Drat! Billy Higgins is on track 2. Now I have to get that album!). But neither one of 'em solves the mystery of track 8! Why, oh WHY do our heroes let us down?!?!? :P:P:P

Sam Rivers is the tenor on track 7. Now that I listen to it, I can hear it. But I would NEVER have guessed him; not in a million years! (Okay, maybe 999,998 years, but no less!)

The cool thing about this BFT is that is seems to have picked what would've been my favorite tracks from the albums from which they came (track 18, f'rinstance; I'm listening to the clips right now, and can already tell this would not be to my liking. But track 18, holy SHIT how that swings!!!)

I like what JSngry said about track 15: nuff said, INDEED!!!

But the coolest thing about this BFT is that it has the same sense of fun and whimsy that BFT #21 had. (pat, pat, pat, pat!) Seriously, I felt like I was listening to a BFT that I could've easily put together, because this is pretty much the same kind of music I dig: happy, bouncy, SWINGING LIKE MAD!

I mean, ever since I posted my guesses, I've been listening to this sucker non-stop. Now that JSngry & Brownie have posted their guesses, it's like listening with new ears (or, at least, better educated ears, anyway!)

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