JSngry

NEW, NEVER HEARD, DIZZY & BIRD FROM UPTOWN

482 posts in this topic

If you're in Canada can you order directly  from the good doctor?

First of all, he does not have any stock and second he doesn't have time to operate the "nuts and bolts" of a record company. That's why I do what I do. :g

I ship to Canadians for $15 post paid, just like they were Americans "like us". :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The album has entered the Billboard Jazz Chart...

From PlaybillArts:

Early Parker-Gillespie Recording Debuts on Billboard Jazz Chart

By Ben Mattison

27 Aug 2005

An early live recording of bebop pioneers Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie debuted on the Billboard jazz chart this week at number 19.

The CD, which has been greeted with rapture by critics and fans, was drawn from recently discovered acetate discs recorded at Parker and Gillespie's concert at Town Hall on June 22, 1945—mere weeks after the two made their first studio recording.

Also new to the chart was a compilation of music by pianist Ahmad Jamal, The Legendary Okeh & Epic Recordings, which debuted at number 25.

Singer Michael Bublé's It's Time topped the chart for the 27th time. The biggest movers included singer Rita Coolidge's And So Is Love, which jumped from number 25 to number six.

New entries on the contemporary-jazz chart included guitarist Marc Antoine's Modern Times at number 11, and vocalist Marilyn Scott's Handpicked at number 16. Brian Culbertson's It's On Tonight remained at number one for the fourth straight week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An early live recording of bebop pioneers Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie debuted on the Billboard jazz chart this week at number 19.

:excited::excited::party::party:

Also new to the chart was a compilation of music by pianist Ahmad Jamal, The Legendary Okeh & Epic Recordings, which debuted at number 25.

:):):tup:tup

Singer Michael Bublé's It's Time topped the chart for the 27th time. The biggest movers included singer Rita Coolidge's And So Is Love, which jumped from number 25 to number six.

:huh::huh::unsure::unsure:

New entries on the contemporary-jazz chart included guitarist Marc Antoine's Modern Times at number 11, and vocalist Marilyn Scott's Handpicked at number 16. Brian Culbertson's It's On Tonight remained at number one for the fourth straight week.

:(:angry::wacko::crazy::excl::bad:

Yep, there's a smiley for just about everything...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An early live recording of bebop pioneers Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie debuted on the Billboard jazz chart this week at number 19.

:excited::excited::party::party:

Also new to the chart was a compilation of music by pianist Ahmad Jamal, The Legendary Okeh & Epic Recordings, which debuted at number 25.

:):):tup:tup

Singer Michael Bublé's It's Time topped the chart for the 27th time. The biggest movers included singer Rita Coolidge's And So Is Love, which jumped from number 25 to number six.

:huh::huh::unsure::unsure:

New entries on the contemporary-jazz chart included guitarist Marc Antoine's Modern Times at number 11, and vocalist Marilyn Scott's Handpicked at number 16. Brian Culbertson's It's On Tonight remained at number one for the fourth straight week.

:(:angry::wacko::crazy::excl::bad:

Yep, there's a smiley for just about everything...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As well as the fact that practically anything instrumental can be lumped into the "jazz" category by the marketing powers that be.  Then again, who can blame them when jazz festivals book instrumental and vocal pop artists to attact more attendees.  Does a serious jazz fan even pay attention to Billboard charts or Grammy awards?

Quite so. There's just something plain wrong about Diz & Bird battling it out with Rita Coolidge... <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's just something plain wrong about Diz & Bird battling it out with Rita Coolidge...  <_<

But I'd pay to see it! :crazy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An early live recording of bebop pioneers Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie debuted on the Billboard jazz chart this week at number 19.

Number 19? How abut number 1? How many recordings of this significance have been released in the last ten years?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today would have been Charlie Parker's 85th birthday -- an excellent reason to buy this release, if anyone reading this hasn't done so already.

Also a good opportunity for me to belatedly join those who have recommended buying it directly from Chuck Nessa. I was amazed at how quickly he answered my inquiry and got the disc in the mail to me. Thanks again, Chuck, and congratulations to you and the others involved in putting this out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today would have been Charlie Parker's 85th birthday -- an excellent reason to buy this release, if anyone reading this hasn't done so already.

Also a good opportunity for me to belatedly join those who have recommended buying it directly from Chuck Nessa. I was amazed at how quickly he answered my inquiry and got the disc in the mail to me. Thanks again, Chuck, and congratulations to you and the others involved in putting this out.

.....that Chuck's a peach! :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't noticed mention of this review here yet, so I typed it in for anyone who hasn't seen it:

Downbeat Review, Nov 2005 - 5 Stars

This CD may make it hip to join the Chelmsford, Conn., Elks Club.  It was there that the discs containing this remarkable 1945 concert by Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker were excavated several years ago by Robert Sunenblick, whose Uptown Records released an earlier Parker discovery in 1997, Boston 1952.

Town Hall surpasses Boston.  It is easily the record of the year, and one sure to go straight to the top of the jazz canon on the basis of its pristine sound and the extended, probing, ferocious performances of six soon-to-be bop standards just as the music was starting to hit the public radar.  The tunes may be "war horses" now, but they're so freshly minted here, the first pressings had not yet hit the stores.  On that fascinating short list of lost moments in jazz history miraculously reclaimed through sheer luck, this CD takes an honored place.  While it won't quite displace such long standard ad hoc reclamations as Benny Goodman's first Carnegie Hall concert or Spirituals to Swing, it certainly joins them, along with such other priceless epiphanies as Duke Ellington at Fargo, the Birth of the Cool broadcasts, the 1940 Parker Kansas City transcriptions, and perhaps even the recent Thelonious Monk-John Coltrane concert CD. 

They're all tied by a common thread.  With remarkable precision, each catches a confluence of creative energy and growth in which something important and startling suddenly gels into coherence and clarity.  The space between tentative experiment and comfortable ennui is a brief, intensely perishable moment in time.  And that's exactly what this CD has made imperishable. 

As a work of history, it has been smartly done.  Ira Gitler's eyewitness notes of the time are excellent, and period documents such as ads (Gillespie gets star billing; Parker is just a sideman) and concert reviews add a nice period verisimilitude.  DownBeat writer Frank stacy, we learn, complained about the stage management and found some of the music repetitious.  But it was all so new, barely a month or two old.  Gillespie and Parker were barely known.  Reactions were uncertain and unsettled, except for those of host Sid Torin, who was already a true believer.

Gillespie and Parker (in contrast to Don Byas, who stands in for a tardy Bird on "Bebop") are less dependent on traditional riffs, ideas and discrete lyricism.  Bop was about virtuosity and speed.  Initially, some found it nervous.  Leonard Feather, who would become one of bop's most articulate advocates, found these performances "too fast for comfortable phrasing."  The notes often merge into swirling, double-time streaks of sound, the sonic counterpart of the strobe effect in the eye.  The horns even go to the edge of free-jazz coming out of Al Haig on "Salt Peanuts."  But when the tempo moderates on "Groovin High," the music's thinking and detail work become more accessible, as in the solo tag when Gillespie picks up on Parker's last riff.  On drums, Max Roach is young and brilliant.  Yet, sitting in on "Hot House," Sid Catlett remains the master story teller. 

-John McDonough

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, it'll be record of the year until McDonough hears the new Coltrane at the Half Note set.....

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somebody wanna educate me about what "the 1940 Parker Kansas City transcriptions" are?? (And when were they discovered?).

This something you have, Spontoonious??

Are they Parker's very earliest known recordings??

Edited by Rooster_Ties

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's referring to the recordings with the Jay McShann Orchestra that were issued in Early Bird from Spotlite 120 (both in lp and cd, although the number refers to the cd version, which I have). I can't be sure but it probably is the earliest recordings of Bird that I know. The 1940 recordings from Station KFBI in Wichita Kansas on November 30, 1940 are I Found a New Baby and Body and Soul.

Edited by Brad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think he means this. Homemade tryout recordings, from the looks of things. Apparently the earliest Parker on disc. Not sure it foretells what was to come, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Honeysuckle Rose referred to in Spontooneous' link was, according to the Stash CD Birth of the Bebop, probably recorded in May 1940. If you can get this cd, pick it up because it's historically significant for having the recordings made by Bob Redcross of Bird, Dizzy and Oscar Pettiford in 1943 in Chicago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris Sheridan writing in Jazz Review (UK) this month:

"Presumably, the pirates in Andorra are already cloning it as they did with Uptwon's important Charles Mingus CD of his West Coast recordings"

And right he was. Just noticed this on Dusty Groove's Upcoming Releases page:

Charlie Parker & Dizzy Gillespie -- Complete Town Hall Concert -- New York 1945 . . . CD . . . Early January, 2006

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonder what their deal with Lorraine Gillespie was.

:huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonder where they found their set of acetates.

Wonder who did the transfers for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to change the subject (yeah, wtf is that on the Dusty sight?? :angry: ) ...

...but Chuck, do you happen to know how many units of this title (the legit one), have been sold to date??

Just curious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trade that info (though it is not mine to share) for a copy of your 1040. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris Sheridan writing in Jazz Review (UK) this month:

"Presumably, the pirates in Andorra are already cloning it as they did with Uptwon's important Charles Mingus CD of his West Coast recordings"

And right he was. Just noticed this on Dusty Groove's Upcoming Releases page:

Charlie Parker & Dizzy Gillespie -- Complete Town Hall Concert -- New York 1945 . . . CD . . . Early January, 2006

disgraceful :tdown:tdown:tdown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charlie Parker & Dizzy Gillespie -- Complete Town Hall Concert -- New York 1945 . . . CD . . . Early January, 2006

disgraceful :tdown:tdown:tdown

I'm no copyright expert, but I wonder if the European 50 year copyright law applies to recordings that were never issued? I guess these guys think so. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charlie Parker & Dizzy Gillespie -- Complete Town Hall Concert -- New York 1945 . . . CD . . . Early January, 2006

But.... this version is 'Complete'! :ph34r:

Maybe I'm wrong, but in the past I'm sure I've seen that the remastering itself was subject to copyright... Even if the original recordings have elapsed, does Ted Kendall's work have some kind of legal protection?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can we mount a campaign and ask Dusty Groove NOT to carry this title?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trade that info (though it is not mine to share) for a copy of your 1040. :)

Chuck - let me ask RT's question this way - have sales met or exceeded expectations? Hopefully the latter!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.