alocispepraluger102

what are you drinking right now?

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19 hours ago, stephenrr said:

Special occasion blowout pre-Stones concert...1994 Dominus and 1995 Chateau Mouton Rothschild.  On this evening the First Growth was edged out by the California wine which surprised all of us...if anything the Mouton is still developing and integrating it's tannin/acid/fruit.  By the way, the '94 Dominus tops every other new world wine i've had in over 30 years of professional/personal tasting.  Halfway between Napa and Bordeaux.

 

I have 2 bottles of 2012 Dominus in my cellar but I just don't know when to open them. I opened one a couple of years back and it was definitely not ready. I actually hate bottles like these - I never know when to open them! :)

Last night, I opened my last bottle of 2009 A. Rafanelli Cabernet Sauvignon. While still very good, it took a while to open up and even then, it wasn't as good as it would have been had I opened it several years ago. Aging wine is a difficult task, especially when you start acquiring a lot of wines that need some time in your cellar.

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Truth be told, 30 years ago I was seduced by Napa Cabs...but those wines no longer exist due to climate change...and I no longer find those huge reds have a spot on my table...but...I've had the '94 Dominus maybe 10 times in my life...I just purchased 6 bottles at auction for more than I'll admit...Close to perfection, but so are 50 year old Burgundies, 40 year old Barolos.  Now I purchase one bottle of Dominus every year, along with 1 bottle of Ridge Monte Bello cab...and I pretend I'll live long enough to enjoy them...I won't.  Your 2012 Dominus will drink well into the 2040's...I've got one eye looking for California cabs from the 1970's, particularly 1974...but they'll cost a small fortune.  Cheers.  

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2 hours ago, stephenrr said:

Truth be told, 30 years ago I was seduced by Napa Cabs...but those wines no longer exist due to climate change...and I no longer find those huge reds have a spot on my table...but...I've had the '94 Dominus maybe 10 times in my life...I just purchased 6 bottles at auction for more than I'll admit...Close to perfection, but so are 50 year old Burgundies, 40 year old Barolos.  Now I purchase one bottle of Dominus every year, along with 1 bottle of Ridge Monte Bello cab...and I pretend I'll live long enough to enjoy them...I won't.  Your 2012 Dominus will drink well into the 2040's...I've got one eye looking for California cabs from the 1970's, particularly 1974...but they'll cost a small fortune.  Cheers.  

I'm actually finding myself swinging the other way - I am enjoying big, bold Californian Cabs that are ready to drink now. While I have not really enjoyed many of the aged wines I've opened recently, there have been several 2014 & 2016 wines that have been simply phenomenal right off the shelf.

I wonder if you need to look around a bit. Some of the big Napa names from 30 years ago are not what they were back then. Caymus is making so much wine now, there's no way they can be that cult wine that they used to be.

Look to Paso Robles. Try a Justin Isosceles Reserve. Or a Daou Soul of a Lion Reserve Cab. Or go to Sonoma... try a KInsella Cab - so drinkable right out of the chute. One of my favorite Californian wineries is in Sonoma - A. Rafanelli. Their Cab is superb and it won't cost you an arm and a leg (if you can get it).

Napa is a bit over rated.

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I find Cabernet does one thing well...that two inch rare ribeye...I have a cellar full of high end california pinot noir (which goes with everything), old vine Zinfandel, and syrah.  I do love Paso wines, just not cabs...I'm on the list from Booker, Denner, L'Aventure, and Tablas Creek.  I prefer my cabs from further north...Washington State like Quilceda Creek, Gramercy, Leonetti, and Woodward Canyon.  I'm finding 15% ABV wines don't set well with my aging body...I do love Rafanelli, though they're impossible to get at retail...and I prefer their Zins to their cabs.  Twenty five years ago Rafanelli was in my portfolio when I sold wine wholesale...entire state of NJ got 15 cases...and all pre-sold through the winery.  That part of Sonoma...Dry Creek Valley is probably my favorite spot in the world  We go to Healdsburg maybe twice a year.  Paso is also a fun place to visit..great wine, beer, and olive oil.

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A glas of Sauvignon Blanc. I like it very dry. Cheers.

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I have a few K Syrahs from Charles...an Old Bones, a Royal City, and a Skull...but these wines are mammoth.  Two glasses and you need a nap.  I have more stuff from Cristophe Baron at Cayuse than I can drink.  And stylistically, I'm moving away from these wines.  Even get to Chicago we can pull a few corks.  I grew up in the Yakima Valley and lately I've been searching out Wash. Chenin Blanc for patio wines...someone 40 years ago planted Chenin Blanc in Washington for some reason, but I think theres only about 60 acres left.  Bone dry, unoaked, and refreshing...reminiscent of loire chenin.

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I'm kind of far away from Chicago, but I do appreciate the offer! I'm usually more of a ruby red person, but today it is a bit hot outside and I felt like some refreshment. :)

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1 hour ago, stephenrr said:

I have a few K Syrahs from Charles...an Old Bones, a Royal City, and a Skull...but these wines are mammoth.  Two glasses and you need a nap.  I have more stuff from Cristophe Baron at Cayuse than I can drink.  And stylistically, I'm moving away from these wines.  Even get to Chicago we can pull a few corks.  I grew up in the Yakima Valley and lately I've been searching out Wash. Chenin Blanc for patio wines...someone 40 years ago planted Chenin Blanc in Washington for some reason, but I think theres only about 60 acres left.  Bone dry, unoaked, and refreshing...reminiscent of loire chenin.

I'm (forever) on the Cayuse & No Girls waiting lists. I've moved on to Torrin, Law, etc. instead in Paso.

In a different region, I also like Keplinger.

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21 hours ago, stephenrr said:

I find Cabernet does one thing well...that two inch rare ribeye...I have a cellar full of high end california pinot noir (which goes with everything), old vine Zinfandel, and syrah.  I do love Paso wines, just not cabs...I'm on the list from Booker, Denner, L'Aventure, and Tablas Creek.  I prefer my cabs from further north...Washington State like Quilceda Creek, Gramercy, Leonetti, and Woodward Canyon.  I'm finding 15% ABV wines don't set well with my aging body...I do love Rafanelli, though they're impossible to get at retail...and I prefer their Zins to their cabs.  Twenty five years ago Rafanelli was in my portfolio when I sold wine wholesale...entire state of NJ got 15 cases...and all pre-sold through the winery.  That part of Sonoma...Dry Creek Valley is probably my favorite spot in the world  We go to Healdsburg maybe twice a year.  Paso is also a fun place to visit..great wine, beer, and olive oil.

If you do get back to Dry Creek, try the Lambert Bridge winery. I went there in February and tasted some wonderful (if expensive) wines. It's literally up the street from Rafanellli, so you can "kill two birds with one stone" as they say.

BTW - I get you on the high ABV thing. I am finding that I'm not liking much of Turley's offerings lately. Just too much ABV in their wines.

Like you, I enjoy Rafanelli's Zins more than their Cabs. My favorite Zin these days is Peter Seghesio's San Lorenzo. When his family sold their winery, he kept their original Zin vineyard and is making some wonderful Zin there.

Next time you grill up a ribeye, try a Pride Mountain Merlot or Shafer Merlot. The acidity of Merlot seems to complement the rare steak better than a lot of Cabs.

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I'm indulging in the expensive good stuff.

Mountain-Valley-Sparkling-Water-2.jpg

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Vintage 2015 .... a beauty ....

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2015 Booker Ripper - 100% grenache

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14 Justin Savant. Large group so if that runs out, up next is the 2014 Hess Collection Cabernet Sauvignon.

https://wineexpress.scene7.com/is/image/WineExpress/f/500/132015614_1.jpg

https://images.vivino.com/thumbs/jzBmiqJ9TU6Xlu8lRqyImw_pl_375x500.png

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2016 Hirsch Vineyards Chardonnay...one of my perennial favorites.

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18 hours ago, bresna said:

14 Justin Savant. Large group so if that runs out, up next is the 2014 Hess Collection Cabernet Sauvignon.

The 2014 Savant was still phenomenal. The Hess was... eh. I expected a lot more for the price.

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Celebrating my 32nd wedding anniversary tonight so I'm opening up a 2014 Pahlmeyer Red. James Suckling gave it 97 points but then went on to say that it has a nose of iodine. WTF? I mean, really WTF??? Drinking iodine is at about the same level as running with bulls in my book of "things to avoid". :)

Image result for 2014 pahlmeyer cabernet

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Nice choice on the Tablas Vermentino...went through three cases of last years iteration.  Probably my favorite patio/mid-summer quaffing wine of all time.  My order this year goes in towards the end of July.

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Bodegas Piedemonte MOSCATEL, NAVARRA DO, 2015

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Homemade raspberry juice :D ....

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CHÂTEAU DE JAU 2017

Côtes du Roussillon-Villages

Somewhat disappointing. Nice for accompanying a dinner, but too weak as a standalone  drink. Made from Syrah, Mourvèdre, Grenache grapes - I prefer Carignan as a base

Edited by mikeweil

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FEUDO ARANCIO Grillo 2018

Better than last year's vintage.

Edited by mikeweil

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