king ubu

Fresh Sound & Lone Hill Reissues Discussion

396 posts in this topic

Here's the idea: we've had plenty of threads about the ethical (and legal) aspects of these European labels and their reissue programmes, and there's a particularly good one active right now again, here:

http://www.organissimo.org/forum/index.php?showtopic=27683

The Freshsound website can be viewed here, it also includes (listed under "Distribution Labels") Lone Hill and other "suspects" (Definitive, Disconforme, Jazz Factory, Ocium, Swing Factory):

http://www.freshsoundrecords.com/newreleases.php

Now my plan for this thread is to discuss not the general questions rising from these labels' activities, but rather have a thread dedicated to discussion of particular reissues, debating if one should buy this or that, or not. Since Fresh Sound and Lone Hill are releasing lots of discs, I find it very hard to get some kind of overview, and even harder it often is to make considerations about should I buy this or that reissue, or should I not, and why. So that's what I would enjoy seing publicly discussed, as sort of a guide through mined territories of theft and of accomplishment.

For instance, total no-buys would be:

- the Definitive rip-off of the Mingus Forties East Coast sides (originally a *terrific* Uptown release)

- the Definitive rip-off of the Parker/Gillespie 1945 Town Hall concert (again originally on Uptown)

- the Jazz Factory version of the Quintet's "Jazz at Massey Hall" (Debut/OJC/Fantasy/Concorde [why can't they even spell their name correctly? :g )

- the Jazz Factory Horace Silver Trio (originally on Blue Note)

- actually almost any "complete Blue Note" or "... Verve" package on Jazz Factory (possibly just Jazz Factory in its entirety should be forgotten!)

But then, Freshsound has released a bunch of very nice sets, of late, with good documentation, and with what I think is new: exact info about original releases (Lonehill bitches around and does not dare to mention original labels, at least not on the few dsics I got hold of).

I very much enjoy this package, for instance, combining the three dates of Eddie Bert's for Savoy (released on three rather short LPs, originally):

c4588.jpg

Crosstown (2 Cd Set)

Eddie Bert Quartet & Quintet

Featuring: Eddie Bert (tb), JR. Monterose (ts), Joe Puma (g), Hank Jones (p), Wendell Marshall or Clyde Lombardi (b), and Kenny Clarke (d)

REFERENCE: FSRCD 427_2

BAR CODE: -

PRICE: 17.40 €

When trombonist Eddie Bert made these recordings he was at a point in his career where his playing was illustrative of all the eloquence that is representative of that many-dimensioned individual. Eddie had emerged as a major voice on his horn in 1954, when the Metronome Yearbook awarded him as one of the four “Musicians of the Year.” Eddie was one of those musicians on the Jazz scene who had been able to participate in some of the most advanced musical experiments and yet retain a healthy, creative and swinging style of playing.

The primary reason: his roots run deep into the varied streams of Jazz. As a composer, his tunes are an evidence of Eddie’s unpretentiously imaginative, well constructed, and melodically attractive writing.

Tracklisting:

CD 1

1. Fragile

2. Stompin’ At The Savoy

3. I Should ‘A’ Said

4. See You Later

5. Three Bass Hit

6. What D’ya Say?

7. Billie’s Bounce

8. Bert Tram

9. One For Tubby

10. Opicana

11. It’s Only Sunshine

CD 2:

1. Crosstown

2. Wishbone

3. Bronx Line

4. Conversation

5. Manhattan Suite

6. Steady Eddie

7. Slow Crosstown

Or this one here:

c4317.jpg

Adventures In Jazz: The Complete Columbia Recordings 1954-1955 (2 Cd Set)

Pete Rugolo and His Orchestra

Featuring: Pete Candoli, Maynard Ferguson, Shorty Rogers, Buddy Childers, Conrad Gozzo (tp), Harry Betts, Milt Bernhart, Herbie Harper, John Halliburton, Bob Fitzpatrick, George Roberts (tb), Fred Fox, John Grass, Bill Hinshaw, Joe Eager, Vince deRosa, John Cave, Si

REFERENCE: FSRCD 2213_2

BAR CODE: -

PRICE: 17.40 €

In the early Fifties Pete Rugolo was best known for his work as Stan Kenton's chief arranger. After that, he spent five years arranging music for singers and writing Hollywood film scores. Then, in January 1954, he signed on with Columbia Records as an important part of their plans to expand both their dance and jazz divisions. "As I got going with the writing and recording, I became enthusiastic about the possibilities of the sound I could have with my own band," said Pete, after gathering a band of 20 men made up by the top-rated sidemen in the Hollywood studios. This CD set includes the complete songbook Pete Rugolo managed to record with his orchestra between 1954 and 1955. We can hear instrumentation including French horn, oboe, flute, piccolo, celesta, tympani, timbales, bongos and tuba in addition to the regular complement. There are accordingly some unusual voicings and resultantly pleasant tone colors that reflect the Milhaud influence. Yet, these are the very particular musical adventures of an accomplished, imaginative and successful writer. In them, Rugolo skilfully incorporates the essence of jazz and sprays it with his ever-present sense of humor.

Tracklisting:

CD1

1. That old Black Magic

2. Laura

3. Early Stan

4. Come Back Little Rocket

5. You Stepped Out of a Dream

6. California Melodies

7. Bazaar

8. 360 Special

9. Theme from the Lombardo Ending

10. Mañana

11. Good Evening Friends Boogie

12. King Porter Storm

13. In the Shade of the Old Apple

14. Jingle Bells Mambo

15. Poinciana

16. My Funny Valentine

17. Rugolo Meets Shearing

18. Mixin’ the Blues

19. 4.20 AM

20. Latin Nocturne

CD2

1. There will Never Be Another You

2. Conversation

3. You are Too Beautiful

4. Here’s Pete

5. Shave and a Haircut

6. Sidewalks of New York

7. Manhattan Mambo

8. Sambamba

9. When Your Lover has Gone

10. Everything I have is Yours

11. Gone with the Wind

12. Hornorama

13. Little White Lies

14. Bobbin’ with Bob

15. Quiet Village (Cha cha cha)

16. Bongo Dance

17. Intermezzo

18. Montevideo

19. In a Sentimental Mood

20. Me Next!

Personnel and dates:

CD1

#1-4: Pete Candoli, Maynard Ferguson, Shorty Rogers, Conrad Gozzo (tp), Harry Betts, Milt Bernhart, Herbie Harper, John Halliburton (tb), Fred Fox, John Grass (frh), Paul Sarmento (tuba), Harry Klee (piccolo, as), Bud Shank (fl, as), Bob Cooper (oboe, ts), Jimmy Giuffre, (ts, bars), Bob Gordon (bars), Claude Williamson (p, celeste), Howard Roberts (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d), Bernie Mattison (tympani and percussion). Hollywood, February 8, 1954.

#5-8: Same but Joe Eager (frh) replaces Graas. Hollywood, February 24, 1954.

#9-11: Pete Candoli, Maynard Ferguson, Shorty Rogers, Conrad Gozzo (tp), Harry Betts, Milt Bernhart, Herbie Harper, Bob Fitzpatrick (tb), Fred Fox, Bill Hinshaw (frh), Paul Sarmento (tuba), Harry Klee (piccolo, as), Bud Shank (fl, as), Bob Cooper (oboe, ts), Jimmy Giuffre, (ts, bars), Bob Gordon (bars), Claude Williamson (p, celeste), Howard Roberts (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d), Bernie Mattison (tympani and percussion). Hollywood, April 28, 1954.

#13-16: Pete Candoli, Maynard Ferguson, Shorty Rogers, Buddy Childers (tp), Harry Betts, Milt Bernhart, George Roberts, Bob Fitzpatrick (tb), Vince DeRosa, Sinclair Lott (frh), Paul Sarmento (tuba), Ethmer Rotten (piccolo, as), Bud Shank (fl, as), Bob Cooper (oboe, ts), Jimmy Giuffre, (ts, bars), Bob Gordon (bars), Claude Williamson (p, celeste), Howard Roberts (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d), Bernie Mattison (tympani and percussion). Hollywood, April 29, 1954.

#17-20: Pete Candoli, Maynard Ferguson, Shorty Rogers, Conrad Gozzo (tp), Milt Bernhart, George Roberts, John Halliburton, Herbie Harper (tb), John Cave, Sinclair Lott (frh), Paul Sarmento (tuba), Harry Klee (piccolo, as), Bud Shank (fl, as), Bob Cooper (oboe, ts), Jimmy Giuffre, (ts, bars), Bob Gordon (bars), Claude Williamson (p, celeste), Howard Roberts (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d), Bernie Mattison (tympani and percussion). Hollywood, May 10, 1954.

CD2

#1-5: Pete Candoli, Maynard Ferguson, Shorty Rogers, Don Paladino (tp), Milt Bernhart, Bob Fitzpatrick, John Halliburton, Herbie Harper (tb), John Cave, Sinclair Lott (frh), Paul Sarmento (tuba), Harry Klee (piccolo, as), Bud Shank (fl, as), Bob Cooper (oboe, ts), Jimmy Giuffre, (ts, bars), Bob Gordon (bars), Claude Williamson (p, celeste), Laurindo Almeida (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d), Bernie Mattison (tympani and percussion). Hollywood, June 21, 1954.

#6-8: Pete Candoli, Maynard Ferguson, Shorty Rogers, Mickey Mangano (tp), Milt Bernhart, Harry Betts, Bob Fitzpatrick, Herbie Harper (tb), John Graas, Sinclair Lott (frh), Paul Sarmento (tuba), Ethmer Roten, Bud Shank (fl, as), Bob Cooper (oboe, ts), Jimmy Giuffre, (ts, bars), Bob Gordon (bars), Claude Williamson (p, celeste), Howard Roberts (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d), Ralph Hensel (xyl), Frank Guerrero (timbales), Joe Guerrero (bgo, perc), Lynn Franklyn (vcl #7). Hollywood, July 8, 1954.

#9-12: Larry Klein, Leon Merian, Doug Mettome, John Wilson (tp), Eddie Bert, Kai Winding, Milt Gold, Frank Rehak (tb), Stan Paley, Julius Watkins (frh), Bill Barber (tuba), Herbie Mann (fl, piccolo, as), Dave Schildkraut (as, cl), Chasy Dean (ts, cl), Joe Megro (ts), Marty Flax (bs), Gordon Brown (p), Perry Lopez (g), Whitey Mitchell (b), Jerry Segal (d), Teddy Sommer (perc). NYC, October 11, 1954.

#13-16: Maynard Ferguson, Buddy Childers, Uan Rasey, Shorty Rogers (tp), Milt Bernhart, Harry Betts, Bob Fitzpatrick, Herbie Harper (tb), John Graas, Vince DeRosa (frh), Paul Sarmento (tuba), Harry Klee (piccolo, as), Bud Shank (fl, as), Bob Cooper (oboe, ts), Jimmy Giuffre, (ts, bars), Bob Gordon (bars), Russ Freeman (p, celeste), Howard Roberts (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d), Bernie Mattison (tympani, perc), Jack Costanzo (bgo). Hollywood, February 22, 1955.

#17: Bud Shank (fl, as), Harry Klee (fl, piccolo, as), Bob Cooper (oboe, ts), Jimmy Giuffre, (ts, bars), Bob Gordon (bars), Russ Freeman (p, celeste), Howard Roberts (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d). Hollywood, February 22, 1955.

#18-20: The Rugolettes: Milt Bernhart (tb), John Graas (frh), Paul Sarmento (tuba), Bud Shank (fl), Bob Cooper (oboe), Howard Roberts (g), Harry Babasin (b), Shelly Manne (d). Hollywood, February 23, 1955.

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After holding out for a while, I recently bought three Lonehill releases. I enjoy them all

Clark Terry/Bob Brookmeyer Quintet Complete Mainstream Recordings

Jimmy Cleveland Complete Recordings

Miles Davis Quintet featuring Barney Wilen - The Amsterdam Concert

Edited by John Tapscott

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The Miles/Wilen is a boot, so it's just as good to buy it from Lonehill than from anyone else, I assume... it's the Amsterdam set, with Klook sort of out of sync except towards the end? But a fine one!

The Cleveland looks interesting, it contains his 4 Mercury albums, yes? The only one I have so far is the Verve Elite Edition of "Introducing Jimmy Cleveland" - a great disc!

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I like the Byrd/Gryce Jazz Workshop series on Lone Hill. Also, the Definitive packaging of the Chet Baker material makes a whole lot more sense than what EMI has done with it. EMI has not served us well recently on how they stretch that Baker Pacific Jazz material into as many CD's as they possible can, 20 minutes of music plus alternate versions. I will admit that the sound quality on the recent EMI Baker issues was stunning compared with what has been out there in the past. Proper does an amazing job in putting out intelligent sets - so many of them are the ultimate word in a given period for a given artist.

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Some time ago (through a pointer received on this board) I bought the Lone Hill reissue of Rusty Bryant's second and third DOT LP's:

http://www.cduniverse.com/search/xx/music/...+Recordings.htm

This is something that to the best of my knowledge has NOT been reissued for ages (apparently nobody cared too much about the DOT label and the stuff released on it) so it typically is one of those cases where the people from Spain step in to fill a void (so I admit I tend to be grateful for it).

However, the claims in the description on this U.S. (!!) seller's site are a bit over the top:

First of all, it is NOT a complete set, only a "complete early Jazz quintet" set. Rusty Bryant did an LP and several singles in a really honking R&B vein prior to those two LP's collected here (the final two tracks on the above CD are a sampling of this first phase of his career).

And his blowing on THIS CD isn't that greasy, hard-boppish throughout either. Actually a lot of the standards are handled in a fairly straightforward manner.

Liner notes are so-so.

I like the disc but those who go all-out for his 60s soul jazz items might better want to listen in first.

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Great fan of Fresh Sound for years!

BUT one to avoid is the Stan Getz-Chet Baker Live at the Haig 1953 CD.

6900650.jpg

The PacificJazz double CD release of the same date (with added material)

CJ6092.GIF

was much better!

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I like the Byrd/Gryce Jazz Workshop series on Lone Hill.

Thanks, I have seen some of these, but I think I really should take a note, I had totally forgotten about them!

Proper does an amazing job in putting out intelligent sets - so many of them are the ultimate word in a given period for a given artist.

I have to disagree here, sorry! I have the Webster and Tatum 4CD sets, but no others... often I have too much of it in another form. Also I find sound quality to be mediocre (to put it kindly), plus often sessions are not complete... but if you're new to some artist, these are a great way to get into his music and then go on from there! For instance, I prefer having the terrific 2CD Blue Note Dameron/Navarro package plus some other CDs over having the Proper Navarro box.

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Some time ago (through a pointer received on this board) I bought the Lone Hill reissue of Rusty Bryant's second and third DOT LP's:

http://www.cduniverse.com/search/xx/music/...+Recordings.htm

This is something that to the best of my knowledge has NOT been reissued for ages (apparently nobody cared too much about the DOT label and the stuff released on it) so it typically is one of those cases where the people from Spain step in to fill a void (so I admit I tend to be grateful for it).

However, the claims in the description on this U.S. (!!) seller's site are a bit over the top:

First of all, it is NOT a complete set, only a "complete early Jazz quintet" set. Rusty Bryant did an LP and several singles in a really honking R&B vein prior to those two LP's collected here (the final two tracks on the above CD are a sampling of this first phase of his career).

And his blowing on THIS CD isn't that greasy, hard-boppish throughout either. Actually a lot of the standards are handled in a fairly straightforward manner.

Liner notes are so-so.

I like the disc but those who go all-out for his 60s soul jazz items might better want to listen in first.

Well, the man's description is accurate. If you want grease from Rusty, this isn't the place to look. But what is fascinating about these Dot recordings is hearing Bryant playing straightahead. It would be even better if he had the chance to stretch out, but obviously that wasn't what Dot wanted. But its great stuff, and one of the few Lonehill releases that I recommend. Whoever owns the Dot catalog ain't going to put it out, and the sound is much better than the LP and CDR I previously had.

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Like I said, Dan, this is one of those cases where these reissues just fill a gap in the history of an artist.

In my case, I had all of his early R&B and was aware of what he did in the 60s so I was curious about exploring these "missing links".

Actually, if other Lone Hill releases mentioned here are anything to go by then this Rusty Bryant CD might have tied in better with the Fresh Sound reissue policy.

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That Rusty Bryant stuff is sweet!

Dot is now part of the Universal/Verve/Etc group, and has been for a while now, back to the 70s, maybe even the late-60s. The Verve Limited Edition Slim Gaillard Rides again was a Dot side.

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Something I've been wondering about: is the Lennie Niehaus series a straight rip-off of the OJC Limited Edition CDs, or how do they compare? I don't have any of either series, but I've had them on the radar (and I did play those jazz etudes of Niehaus' years ago...)

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For instance, total no-buys would be:

- the Definitive rip-off of the Mingus Forties East Coast sides (originally a *terrific* Uptown release)

- the Definitive rip-off of the Parker/Gillespie 1945 Town Hall concert (again originally on Uptown)

- the Jazz Factory version of the Quintet's "Jazz at Massey Hall" (Debut/OJC/Fantasy/Concorde [why can't they even spell their name correctly? :g )

- the Jazz Factory Horace Silver Trio (originally on Blue Note)

- actually almost any "complete Blue Note" or "... Verve" package on Jazz Factory (possibly just Jazz Factory in its entirety should be forgotten!)

While I agree that it would be wrong to buy the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie Uptown clones, I don't really see the problem with purchasing the Massey Hall or Horace. It's been over 50 years for both.'

Guy

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For instance, total no-buys would be:

- the Definitive rip-off of the Mingus Forties East Coast sides (originally a *terrific* Uptown release)

- the Definitive rip-off of the Parker/Gillespie 1945 Town Hall concert (again originally on Uptown)

- the Jazz Factory version of the Quintet's "Jazz at Massey Hall" (Debut/OJC/Fantasy/Concorde [why can't they even spell their name correctly? :g )

- the Jazz Factory Horace Silver Trio (originally on Blue Note)

- actually almost any "complete Blue Note" or "... Verve" package on Jazz Factory (possibly just Jazz Factory in its entirety should be forgotten!)

While I agree that it would be wrong to buy the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie Uptown clones, I don't really see the problem with purchasing the Massey Hall or Horace. It's been over 50 years for both.'

Guy

At least in my neck of the woods, it'd be silly to buy those two Definitive versions since the stores usually label them "imports" and actually charge more than they do for the OJC or Blue Note discs that they "rip off."

*****

The only Lone Hill release that I have is the 3-disc Buck Clayton set, which is undoubtedly ripped from the oop Mosaic box sans alternate takes. I picked it up for about $15 at the Tower clearance even though I already had CDRs of the Mosaic. Love the Mosaic set, but at 5/6 discs it's a bit heavy on the alternates and I actually prefer the more compact way that Lone Hill has laid it all out. It's actually the perfect example of how Mosaic could produce something in a more scholarly (and expensive) fashion, only to have the same material released later in a less exhaustive and thriftier manner for less obsessive fans.

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For instance, total no-buys would be:

- the Definitive rip-off of the Mingus Forties East Coast sides (originally a *terrific* Uptown release)

- the Definitive rip-off of the Parker/Gillespie 1945 Town Hall concert (again originally on Uptown)

- the Jazz Factory version of the Quintet's "Jazz at Massey Hall" (Debut/OJC/Fantasy/Concorde [why can't they even spell their name correctly? :g )

- the Jazz Factory Horace Silver Trio (originally on Blue Note)

- actually almost any "complete Blue Note" or "... Verve" package on Jazz Factory (possibly just Jazz Factory in its entirety should be forgotten!)

While I agree that it would be wrong to buy the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie Uptown clones, I don't really see the problem with purchasing the Massey Hall or Horace. It's been over 50 years for both.'

Guy

Why differentiate the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie CDs? I think I know why - Chuck's here and considered a friend. But they're well beyond the 50 year EU term, so if that's the only criteria, buy 'em. I can see if people say, "I won't buy the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie CDs because I want Chuck Nessa's label to succeed." But if you think the 50 year rule is fine for Horace Silver and the Quintet, then it's fine for these as well. Why not screw Chuck's label out of some return on investment too? <_<

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I'm thrilled to see the Davey Schildkraut sessions on the Rugolo, and so will definitely purchase them - Davey told me about these, but this is the first I've seen them available in a while -

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Why differentiate the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie CDs? I think I know why - Chuck's here and considered a friend. But they're well beyond the 50 year EU term, so if that's the only criteria, buy 'em. I can see if people say, "I won't buy the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie CDs because I want Chuck Nessa's label to succeed." But if you think the 50 year rule is fine for Horace Silver and the Quintet, then it's fine for these as well. Why not screw Chuck's label out of some return on investment too? <_<

Because the Parker/Gillespie CD is a new issue and the Mingus was a painstakingly assembled labour of love that some git from the hills of Andorra turned around and pirated without having to do any legwork.

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Why differentiate the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie CDs? I think I know why - Chuck's here and considered a friend. But they're well beyond the 50 year EU term, so if that's the only criteria, buy 'em. I can see if people say, "I won't buy the Mingus and Parker/Gillespie CDs because I want Chuck Nessa's label to succeed." But if you think the 50 year rule is fine for Horace Silver and the Quintet, then it's fine for these as well. Why not screw Chuck's label out of some return on investment too? <_<

Because the Parker/Gillespie CD is a new issue and the Mingus was a painstakingly assembled labour of love that some git from the hills of Andorra turned around and pirated without having to do any legwork.

Exactly.

Guy

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For instance, total no-buys would be:

- the Definitive rip-off of the Mingus Forties East Coast sides (originally a *terrific* Uptown release)

- the Definitive rip-off of the Parker/Gillespie 1945 Town Hall concert (again originally on Uptown)

- the Jazz Factory version of the Quintet's "Jazz at Massey Hall" (Debut/OJC/Fantasy/Concorde [why can't they even spell their name correctly? :g )

I believe they do spell it correctly, based on the spelling of the city of Concord California.

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are you fucking serious, bro'?

No. I thought I was being blatantly un-serious. I used the "wiseass" symbol <_< to show that I was being sacrcastic. I was hoping my sarcasm would make it clear that I don't agree with buying any of these labels' releases.

Sarcasm just doesn't work on the Internet. It just doesn't.

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There are a very large number of worthwhile re-issues to get on both Lone Hill and especially Fresh Sound.

Here are just a few that have not been mentioned that I can quickly suggest.

Lone Hill

Dave Bailey Quintet/Sextet - The Complete 1 & 2 Feet In The Gutter Sessions

Budd Johnson - The Stanley Dance Sessions

Fresh Sound

The John Williams Trio - Complete master Takes 1954-1955

Roy Brooks - Beat (with Blue Mitchell & junior Cook)

The Pepper/Knepper Quintet (with Pepper Adams & Jimmy Knepper)

Edited by Peter Friedman

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Lonehill is crass. Avoid the Aylers, anything that says “Complete” and, for truth in advertising purposes, the Dolphy/Lalo Schifrin billing that doesn’t even feature Lalo Schifrin. Caveat emptor.

There’s a lot of great Fresh Sound. I’m not sure about the provenance of some of their stuff, but the reissues are done with a certain amount of care. I recommend the Lee Morgans, the Al Haig reissues, Lucky Thompson, etc.

Fresh Sound’s Lou Blackburn has been superseded by Blue Note’s resuscitation.

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There are a very large number of worthwhile re-issues to get on both Lone Hill and especially Fresh Sound.

Here are just a few that have not been mentioned that I can quickly suggest.

Lone Hill

Dave Bailey Quintet/Sextet - The Complete 1 & 2 Feet In The Gutter Sessions

I am sure the still-living Mr. Bailey would love that.

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There are a very large number of worthwhile re-issues to get on both Lone Hill and especially Fresh Sound.

Here are just a few that have not been mentioned that I can quickly suggest.

Lone Hill

Dave Bailey Quintet/Sextet - The Complete 1 & 2 Feet In The Gutter Sessions

I am sure the still-living Mr. Bailey would love that.

While it's unfortunate that Mr. Bailey won't likely see a dime, he wouldn't see any money if the recordings weren't issued at all either. I'd like to think that if there was any significant profit to be made by releasing these more "officially" that someone would have done so by now. So given that he wouldn't see any dough either way, I'd be more interested in hearing if he'd prefer his legacy to remain unissued or at least reissued in this "grey" manner so that more people can be exposed to his past musical accomplishments.

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There are a very large number of worthwhile re-issues to get on both Lone Hill and especially Fresh Sound.

Here are just a few that have not been mentioned that I can quickly suggest.

Lone Hill

Dave Bailey Quintet/Sextet - The Complete 1 & 2 Feet In The Gutter Sessions

I am sure the still-living Mr. Bailey would love that.

While it's unfortunate that Mr. Bailey won't likely see a dime, he wouldn't see any money if the recordings weren't issued at all either. I'd like to think that if there was any significant profit to be made by releasing these more "officially" that someone would have done so by now. So given that he wouldn't see any dough either way, I'd be more interested in hearing if he'd prefer his legacy to remain unissued or at least reissued in this "grey" manner so that more people can be exposed to his past musical accomplishments.

This probably is not about Dave Bailey, unless he is still getting royalties.

In a legitimate business environment, Lonehill would LICENSE the rights to the recordings from Epic (presumably Sony) - just like Koch did when they issued the Dave Bailey stuff a few years ago. Licensing involves a NEGOTIATION and PAYMENT to the rightful owner.

In this case, the Lonehill people found some of the Koch CDs, burned copies and came up with their own "artwork" and "liner notes". How anyone can defend this is beyond me. Sony is the legal owner to this music. Anyone who uses it without their authority is breaking the law.

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