Rooster_Ties

Books that you WISHED existed, that you'd actually buy

96 posts in this topic

Where's the authoritative critical biography of Thelonious Monk that I'm sure we'd all love to read?

Something I've asked myself from time to time over the years.

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That RCA unit was for 45s only.

Oh, so that was the spindle then? Wow, never saw that before...

Was RCA really that gung-ho about the Speed War that they thought that people would want 45s for everything? God, that's just so...recordindustrial!

Ok, there's a book I'd like to read - the history of the Speed War.

It doesn't cover the speed war, but Brian Rust’s “The American Record Label Book” is a rundown of every record label that existed up to 1942 and is highly amusing in many places. You get the details of which labels used hill & dale tracking, which used lateral tracking, what speeds, what centre hole sizes, disc sizes etc etc. The speed war was nothing compared to the wars between the different formulations of what we refer to as 78s.

The speed wars are covered in “The American Popular Music Business in the 20th Century”, by Russell & David Sanjec. Sanjec Sr was the boss of BMI. So you also get the ASCAP/BMI war - though I suspect a certain bias may have crept in :) There are two versions of this. The original, by Russel, I think, is a two volume opus with tons of documentary detail. The one volume edition was converted by Jr from his father's original to make it more readable.

MG

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In jazz:

I'd like to see thoroughly researched biographies on Jackie McLean and Albert Ayler

In philosophy it'd be neat to read:

A non-political biography on Martin Heidegger (read the 'policitcal' one by Hugo Ott).

All of the works by Aristotle that were lost in the fire at the Library of Alexandria.

And the original manuscript of 'Rules for the Direction of the Mind' by Descartes (if you want to read what happened to it, its in the Cambridge Edition of the Collected Works of Rene Descartes).

And maybe a couple of my own poetry manuscripts-they're typed up and ready to go :cool:

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A non-political biography on Martin Heidegger (read the 'policitcal' one by Hugo Ott).

Heidegger... you must be a tough guy that you can stand his writing... actually you reminded me of a project one of my professors started when i still did philosophy, a translation of Gottlob Freges (famous because it's incorrect but i love his writing style) major work "Grundgesetze der Arithmetik" from his own weird formula language to normal formulas... hope this will get finished in decent time... (they started in 2004)

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A non-political biography on Martin Heidegger (read the 'policitcal' one by Hugo Ott).

Heidegger... you must be a tough guy that you can stand his writing... actually you reminded me of a project one of my professors started when i still did philosophy, a translation of Gottlob Freges (famous because it's incorrect but i love his writing style) major work "Grundgesetze der Arithmetik" from his own weird formula language to normal formulas... hope this will get finished in decent time... (they started in 2004)

His language takes a little getting used to, but as soon as the lexicon hurdle is overcome, it becomes quite clear that he is one of most important philosophers of the 20th century. I've taken two seminars on Heidegger: one on 'Being and Time' and the other on the 'later' Heidegger. Took the latter seminar with a prof who studied with Eugen Fink at Frieburg. Fink was a student and friend of Heidegger's.

Hope that FREGE :g project comes to a completion

Edit: Oops, my bad. I meant Frege not Leibniz.

Edited by Holy Ghost

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A non-political biography on Martin Heidegger (read the 'policitcal' one by Hugo Ott).

Heidegger... you must be a tough guy that you can stand his writing... actually you reminded me of a project one of my professors started when i still did philosophy, a translation of Gottlob Freges (famous because it's incorrect but i love his writing style) major work "Grundgesetze der Arithmetik" from his own weird formula language to normal formulas... hope this will get finished in decent time... (they started in 2004)

His language takes a little getting used to, but as soon as the lexicon hurdle is overcome, it becomes quite clear that he is one of most important philosophers of the 20th century. I've taken two seminars on Heidegger: one on 'Being and Time' and the other on the 'later' Heidegger. Took the latter seminar with a prof who studied with Eugen Fink at Frieburg. Fink was a student and friend of Heidegger's.

Hope that Leibniz project comes to a completion.

Frege, not Leibniz (the only author besides Bertrand Russell who is mentioned in Wittgenstein's Tractatus...), he was the inventor of quantors (English word?) in logic and had his very own way of writing things down

( on page 7 and 8 of this you can see what he did and how they are rewriting it on one of 400 pages http://www.ikp.uni-bonn.de/~fha/fha_gldv05.pdf )

i never got beyond that language issue with Heidegger, it just read so ridiculous... but i do believe you

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A non-political biography on Martin Heidegger (read the 'policitcal' one by Hugo Ott).

Heidegger... you must be a tough guy that you can stand his writing... actually you reminded me of a project one of my professors started when i still did philosophy, a translation of Gottlob Freges (famous because it's incorrect but i love his writing style) major work "Grundgesetze der Arithmetik" from his own weird formula language to normal formulas... hope this will get finished in decent time... (they started in 2004)

His language takes a little getting used to, but as soon as the lexicon hurdle is overcome, it becomes quite clear that he is one of most important philosophers of the 20th century. I've taken two seminars on Heidegger: one on 'Being and Time' and the other on the 'later' Heidegger. Took the latter seminar with a prof who studied with Eugen Fink at Frieburg. Fink was a student and friend of Heidegger's.

Hope that Leibniz project comes to a completion.

Frege, not Leibniz (the only author besides Bertrand Russell who is mentioned in Wittgenstein's Tractatus...), he was the inventor of quantors (English word?) in logic and had his very own way of writing things down

( on page 7 and 8 of this you can see what he did and how they are rewriting it on one of 400 pages http://www.ikp.uni-bonn.de/~fha/fha_gldv05.pdf )

i never got beyond that language issue with Heidegger, it just read so ridiculous... but i do believe you

Yeah, my bad. I meant Frege. Don't know why I said Leibniz. Wittgenstein is another important philosopher, one of the few philosophers to actually recant a work (the Tractatus) but even so, the Tractatus still influenced a whole movement in philosophy, i.e., the Logical Positivists. I even quoted the final proposition of the Tractatus in my reply box below. I took a seminar on the Tractatus as an undergrad and we went proposition by proposition. It was fantastic.

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Hey, I thought I was the only freek around here with a B.A. in philosophy. Unfortunately, I specialized in Thomistic philosophy, so if you want to talk about ens & esse, I'm your man. ;)

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Hey, I thought I was the only freek around here with a B.A. in philosophy. Unfortunately, I specialized in Thomistic philosophy, so if you want to talk about ens & esse, I'm your man. ;)

Yes! We need more philosophers! I Have a BA, MA and currently working on a PhD in philosophy. I've also been teaching philosophy for the last five years. I took a class on Thomas' 'Treastise on Man' in my first year of doctoral work. I walked away from that with an entirely new respect for his work.

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I would not say Frege took many techniques from mathematics into philosophy, he rather invented most of what he needed; besides, i am not so much into the more mathematics related stuff, i prefer his essays on language... and i don't care overly much about what he is actually saying there i just like to read them

That's right, his 'trees' are something entirely different from previous contributions to logic. I Had the opportunity, as a senior project, to work through the Begriffsschrift, which really helped me dig deeper into quantified logic. A rewarding endeavor, if you don't mind spending the time on it.

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Hey, I thought I was the only freek around here with a B.A. in philosophy. Unfortunately, I specialized in Thomistic philosophy, so if you want to talk about ens & esse, I'm your man. ;)

Yes! We need more philosophers! I Have a BA, MA and currently working on a PhD in philosophy. I've also been teaching philosophy for the last five years. I took a class on Thomas' 'Treastise on Man' in my first year of doctoral work. I walked away from that with an entirely new respect for his work.

Add me to the club. I have a BA in philosophy too.

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All of the works by Aristotle that were lost in the fire at the Library of Alexandria.

Good one! (Translated, of course.) :tup

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Oh, and I would like to see Division III of Being and Time too. Who knows, maybe its buried in a pile of unpublished manuscripts somewhere. :rolleyes:

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Hey, I thought I was the only freek around here with a B.A. in philosophy. Unfortunately, I specialized in Thomistic philosophy, so if you want to talk about ens & esse, I'm your man. ;)

Yes! We need more philosophers! I Have a BA, MA and currently working on a PhD in philosophy. I've also been teaching philosophy for the last five years. I took a class on Thomas' 'Treastise on Man' in my first year of doctoral work. I walked away from that with an entirely new respect for his work.

Add me to the club. I have a BA in philosophy too.

Do three philosophy's examinations work as admission of the club? :ph34r:

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inside rice, a forthright brilliant condy, serving no master, speaking as the real condy, 'bout art and things.

in no way meant to be an expose of current or previous higherups.

Edited by alocispepraluger102

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Hey, y'all.

Can't we band together somehow and see that some of these books come to fruition?

I'm envisioning "Organissimo Editions," sort of our own "Library of America," with the first three volumes being Allen Lowe's tome on 1950s Jazz, Holy Ghosts' poetry, and the collected BNBB and Organissimo posts of Jim Sangrey.

What's stopping us?

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Hey, y'all.

Can't we band together somehow and see that some of these books come to fruition?

I'm envisioning "Organissimo Editions," sort of our own "Library of America," with the first three volumes being Allen Lowe's tome on 1950s Jazz, Holy Ghosts' poetry, and the collected BNBB and Organissimo posts of Jim Sangrey.

What's stopping us?

Count me in!

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Uh oh...are we crossing into "let's talk about starting a band" territory here?

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Hey, y'all.

Can't we band together somehow and see that some of these books come to fruition?

I'm envisioning "Organissimo Editions," sort of our own "Library of America," with the first three volumes being Allen Lowe's tome on 1950s Jazz, Holy Ghosts' poetry, and the collected BNBB and Organissimo posts of Jim Sangrey.

What's stopping us?

I have my unpublished book on my computer, if you want to add a comic crime novel at the above. (but we need a translator)

Edited by porcy62

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An exposé of the Lomaxes and their crooked ways is long overdue. It might be dedicated to the memory of Huddie Ledbetter.

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An exposé of the Lomaxes and their crooked ways is long overdue. It might be dedicated to the memory of Huddie Ledbetter.

That would be an interesting book; I'd pick it up.

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A followup to Jean Jacques Sempe's The Musicians - Perhaps he has done another book of drawings of musicians. If so, I haven't seen it.

Still waiting for that followup, in the meantime here is a sample from Sempé's latest book 'Sentiments Distingués' out this week!

sempe.1192746570.jpg

:)

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