BERIGAN

BDT #56 disc 2 answers

17 posts in this topic

First, sorry for the delay. At first, it was just pure laziness after doing this for disc one, then legit reasons crept in! Now I am sick, and want to at least get a start on it....Hopefully it will at least make some sense.....

Disc 2

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(Used cd set is $51, but you can get most if not all the tracks on other cds)

1. Jazz Battle. The Rhythm Aces. Jabbo Smith. Omer Simeon, Clarinet. Cassino Simpson, Piano. Ikey Robinson, Banjo. Hayes Alvis, Tuba. January 29th, 1929

Sounds like a great 30’s player trapped in the banjo laden 20’s. Don’t know if I first heard about him reading liner notes on another performer, in a book, or what…but, when I saw this 2 cd set at Best Buy(Sigh, the good old days!) I snapped it up, and really wish he could have gotten a handle on his drinking sooner….

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2. Old Joe’s Hitting the Jug. Stuff Smith and His Onyx Club Boys. Johan Jones Trumpet, Vocals. Hezekiah Leroy, “Snuff” Smith. Violin, Vocals. Raymond Smith. Piano. Bobby Bennett, Guitar. Mack Walker, Bass, John Washington, Drums. Feb 11th, 1936

So many excellent tracks of Stuffs to choose, but I have always been fond of this one. Some say no one swings more on the violin than he does….I don’t know about that, depends on which violinist I have heard most recently….all I know it I like him a lot…and need to grab more of his “stuff”

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3.Gin For Christmas. Lionel Hampton. Ziggy Elman. Available on Mosaic set, and on Hampton Cd Tempo And Swing(there seems to be a copy for $1.62, since I can‘t find mine, guess I will buy it!.(this crap version in case you didn’t read on the other thread, is from a Christmas cd!)

(O) Ziggy Elman (tp), Toots Mondello (cl, as), Jerry Jerome (ts), Ben Webster (ts), Lionel Hampton (Drums, vcl), Clyde Hart (p, arr), Al Casey (g), Artie Bernstein (bSupervised by Leonard Joy

NYC, October 30, 1939

I keep apologizing for the quality of this one, but this should be the last time I do that! ;) I saw a great older jazz book at a store in LA 10 years ago, was surely going to buy it, when the author decided to just go off on Ziggy Elman, how he was a hack basically, terrible tone, all but ruined the Hampton sides he was on…..

Got me so mad, I didn’t by the book. Regret that know, but was proud of myself then.

To my ears, Hampton and Elman are a perfect paring of high energy guys that somehow don’t clash with each other….I’d love to have heard more of Hampton on drums with Ziggy’s trumpet….

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Track 4 from The Rhythmakers, 1932. Jazz Archives. ($41 used, Retrieval has a newer version, in print that’s still $26 for one lousy cd!!!)

4.Who Stole the Lock? Jack Bland and his Rhythmakers-Red Allen Trumpet, Pee Wee Russell, Clarinet, Tommy Dorsey, Trombone. Happy Caldwell, Tenor. Frank Froeba, Piano. Eddie Condon, Banjo. Jack Bland, Guitar. Pops Foster, Bass. Zutty Singleton, Drum and Chimes(likely) Octomber, 8th, 1932

Not the first mixed race group to record, but still early and not just a token white, or a token black, either. Recall liner notes saying how little real jazz was recorded in 1932, I think record sales were down 80-90%

From 1927, and there just wasn’t a lot of record work that year.

A lot of Tommy Dorsey on these 2 cds! I just love that trombone solo here! There is another take of this song, and it’s a much shorter, less flashy solo. I kinda like Red Allen’s singing here, it just fits.

5-9 from Lost Cords 2 cd set.

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From the 2 cd set, The Lost Chords: 1915-1945 [iMPORT] Of course out of print, $22 used.

5. It’s Right Here for You. Tommy Dorsey, Trumpet. Arthur Schutt,(Harmonium) Eddie Lang, Guitar. Jimmy Williams, Bass. Stan King, Drums. Arthur Schutt, Harmonium. Nov. 10th, 1928

I have a feeling a lot of folks gave up on this one halfway thru! The muted trumpet is a bit cloying early on, but Tommy Dorsey’s open horned solo during the second half, oh my!!!! Unbelievable trumpet solo for a white guy (Or heck, any guy not named Louis) in 1928!!! If you still have the music around, please give it a second spin!!!

It’s like what the Boswell sisters did so often, start slow, and kind of generic, then just do a 180 on a tune. Don’t know who the market for these sort of tracks were, unless it was for me, 70+ years later! ;)

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6. For No Reason at All in C. Frankie Trumbauer, C Melody Saxaphone. Bix Beiderbecke, Piano, Cornet. Eddie Lang, Guitar. May 13th, 1927

Best title for a song, ever!!!! :excited: And someone thought of it 81 years ago???? I love Tram's C Melody playing, even later on when people claim his playing wasn’t up to par any more. Wish that Bix had played more piano, but then there’d be less Cornet, so what ya gonna do???

Ok, 6 down, only 20 more to go...piece of cake.... :party:

Edited by BERIGAN

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Hey look, more info before folks forget completely what music it was in the first place!!!!

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7. The Chant. George Van Eps. November 22, 1934.

I don’t think anyone guessed him….just a nice relaxed recording. Those Van Eps sure could play stringed instruments!

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8. I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles. Georgie Barnes and his Quartet. George Barnes, Electric Guitar. Phillip Ward, Tenor. Earl Backus, Guitar. H. Taft Moore, Bass. Feb 2nd, 1940

Pretty much unknown session not even in most discographies. Would love to hear the other tracks recorded that day. Still can't believe Stereojack knew this one! :blink:

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9. Dance of the Octopus. Red Norvo. From HEP cd of same title. And hey, it's still in print since 1995!!! :excited: Red Norvo, Marimba. Benny Goodman, Bass Clarinet. Dick McDonough, Guitar. Artie Bernstein, Bass. November 21st, 1933.

They had to sneak this and another Track, In a Mist, after midnight, since A&R man Jack Knapp was all about commerical recordings. From the liner notes….I Gunther Schuller’s opinion, the most advanced composition of the early 30’s. Four Mallets are used(I could swear I read they were felt covered, but doesn’t mention that in these notes) to conjure up an imaginven, swirling picture of a Ghostly Neptunian kingdom….

I read somewhere that the someone (Jack Knapp???) berated Red’s arrangements he was writing at this time, and when the tracks didn’t sell well, he burned ton of similar in style arrangements, in a fireplace!

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From Tiny Grimes-Electric Guitar Master. Jazz Archives. Of course out of print, and going for over $60!!! I need to copy mine, and throw mine up on Amazon!

10.Hardee’s Party-John Hardee, Tenor. Sammy Benskin, Piano. Tiny Grimes, Guitar. John Simmons, Bass. Big Sid Catlett, Drums. Feb 28th, 1946.

Man, why have I not heard more of John Hardee??? What a nice, warm, relaxing sound! I am going to write that I bet Mr. Sangrey will know all about him!I hadn't played this cd in awhile, never really warmed up to it the first 2 times in about 10 years of owning it...then played it recently, and wondered why I didn't play this cd a lot more often!

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The Big Band 1923-1952. Swingin’ Uptown. 2 disc set from RCA. Of course out of print, but still cheap on Amazon, and great stuff on it! Tracks 11 , 12, and 13.

11.Springfield Stomp. Cecil Scott and his Bright Boys. Bill Coleman Trumpet(Solo) Frank Newton, trumpet.(Muted Solo?). Cecil Scott, tenor. Dicky Wells. Trombone. Nov 19th, 1929.

Ah, one no one guessed! This is 20’s jazz at its best. That a pretty decent Trumpet section, eh??? Meant to put some Frankie Newton somewhere on this BFT…oh well, I am sure I will remember to do so on the next one 2-3 years down the line! ;)

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12. A La-Bridges.(Written by Harlan Leonard and Tadd Dameron) Harlan Leonard and his Rockets. July 15th, 1940 Henry Bridges, Tenor. Fred Beckett, Trombone. Harlan Leonard. Alto. More relaxed but never boring Tenor….Like Fred Beckett’s trombone as well…another name I don’t know.

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13. Idiot’s Delight. Ray McKinley and his Orchestra. Eddie Sauter, arranger. (no other names listed!)December 30th, 1947. “Newest” track on the 2 discs.

Pretty whack, as the kids say….well, if it was 1995 still! That Eddie Sauter could do this arrangement, And track 17 on Disc one(Benny Rides again) shows what a open musical mind he had.

I like the post war McKinley stuff a lot.

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14. Grand Central Getaway. (Written and arranged by Gillespie) From Jimmy Dorsey at the 400 Restaurant 1946, from HEP.(Naturally, this is from 1944, in Hollywood, not at the 400 Restaurant!)

Jimmy Dorsey, Cl, Alt sax, Bob Alexy, Claude Bowen, Ray Linn, Tony Picciotto, Nathan “Shorty” Solomson, Trumpets. Si Zentner, Thomas “Sonny” Lee, Nicholas “Nick” Dimalo, Andy Russo, Trombones.

Jack Aiken, Frank Langone, Alto. Bobby Dukoff, Charlie Frazier Tenors. Bob Lawson, Baritone. Marvin Wright, Piano. Teddy Walters, Guitar. Jimmy Middleton, bass, Buddy Schultz, drums.

Have a few trumpets and trombones, eh???? Dizzy's arrangements and Jimmy's band made for some very interesting music, pity they didn't work longer together!

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15.Liza(All the Clouds Roll By) Chick Webb and his Orchestra. Mario Bauza, Bobby Stark, Taft Jordan, Trumpets. George Matthews, Sandy Williams, Nat Story, Trombones. Garvin Bushell, Louis Jordan, Wayman Carver, Teddy McRae, Reeds. Tommy Fulford, Piano. Bobby Johnson, Guitar. Beverly Peer , Bass. Chick Webb, Drums. May 3rd, 1938

How can a little guy with TB of the Spine, play so ferociously??? As good a drummer in swing as there ever was. Only made it to the age of 30. A true crime we didn’t get to see him evolve over the next 20 +years

Edited by BERIGAN

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Thanks, young sir! Get well soon!

(Surprised to see I had four of these, not three - but I haven't listened to the Hampton Mosaic all that much yet.)

MG

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9. Dance of the Octopus. Red Norvo. From HEP cd of same title. And hey, it's still in print since 1995!!! :excited: Red Norvo, Marimba. Benny Goodman, Bass Clarinet. Dick McDonough, Guitar. Artie Bernstein, Bass. November 21st, 1933.

They had to sneak this and another Track, In a Mist, after midnight, since A&R man Jack Knapp was all about commerical recordings. From the liner notes….I Gunther Schuller’s opinion, the most advanced composition of the early 30’s. Four Mallets are used(I could swear I read they were felt covered, but doesn’t mention that in these notes) to conjure up an imaginven, swirling picture of a Ghostly Neptunian kingdom….

I read somewhere that the someone (Jack Knapp???) berated Red’s arrangements he was writing at this time, and when the tracks didn’t sell well, he burned ton of similar in style arrangements, in a fireplace!

Arrgh! I'm mad at myself I didn't look after this. Of course I have it, and was on the right track when it reminded me of "In A Mist" by Norvo .... Benny on bass clarinet - how could I forget this? <_<

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First, sorry for the delay. At first, it was just pure laziness after doing this for disc one, then legit reasons crept in! Now I am sick, and want to at least get a start on it....Hopefully it will at least make some sense.....

Disc 2

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(Used cd set is $51, but you can get most if not all the tracks on other cds)

1. Jazz Battle. The Rhythm Aces. Jabbo Smith. Omer Simeon, Clarinet. Cassino Simpson, Piano. Ikey Robinson, Banjo. Hayes Alvis, Tuba. January 29th, 1929...

I hope that you'll be feeling better soon. Aaaargh... Can't believe I missed Jabbo Smith! Like I said before, it's been a long time since I've listened to any of this vintage material. That's a killer track!!!!!

Disc 2 had a higher percentage of really, really good stuff (for my tastes) than did disc 1. Man, those Norvo and (as yet unconfirmed) Boyd Raeburn tracks are the shit.

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2. A La-Bridges.(Written by Harlan Leonard and Tadd Dameron) Harlan Leonard and his Rockets. July 15th, 1940 Henry Bridges, Tenor. Fred Beckett, Trombone. Harlan Leonard. Alto. More relaxed but never boring Tenor….Like Fred Beckett’s trombone as well…another name I don’t know. [\quote]

Bridges mainly stuck around Kansas City. I think he's on some Julia Lee records. But that's about all.

Beckett joined Lionel Hampton later, and recorded with Hamp -- but died young, a TB victim, I think. J.J. Johnson cited him as an influence. His solo on "My Gal Sal" with Leonard is da bomb.

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2. A La-Bridges.(Written by Harlan Leonard and Tadd Dameron) Harlan Leonard and his Rockets. July 15th, 1940 Henry Bridges, Tenor. Fred Beckett, Trombone. Harlan Leonard. Alto. More relaxed but never boring Tenor….Like Fred Beckett’s trombone as well…another name I don’t know.

Bridges mainly stuck around Kansas City. I think he's on some Julia Lee records. But that's about all.

Yes - he's on both copies ( :)) I have of "Julia's blues" which was recorded, depending on which sleeve note you believe, on 23 August 1946 or September 1946. I don't have any other cuts from the session, though.

MG

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Well, here we go, some more semi -coherent talk from a feverish Berigan!!!

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Tracks 16, 17 from An Anthology of Big Band Swing. 1930-1955. Decca 2 cd set.

16. Jamaica Jam(Arranged by Fred Norman) Teddy Powell and his Orchestra. George Esposito, Irving Goodman, Jerry Neary, Trumpets. Sam Genuso, Pete Skinner, Trombones. George Koenig, Gus Bivona, Don(Dom)Lodice, Pete Mondello, Reeds. Milton Raksin, Piano. Ben Hiller, Guitar. Felix Giobbe, Bass. Charlie French, Drums. Teddy Powell, leader. October 6th, 1939.

How many Guessed Teddy Powell?? :blink: I thought so. As close as a white band ever sounded to a loose, swinging black band, IMHO. Very Basie-ish, without sounding slavish. And I never heard of the guy til about 6-7 years ago. Wait,I take it back, I’ve had this cd set for about 15 years!!! Took me awhile to appreciate his band, and I have 2 other cds I think.

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17. Blues in the Groove. (Arranger Eddie Durham) Jan Savitt and his Orchestra. Johnny Austin, Jimmy Campbell, Jack Hansen, Trumpets. Cutty Cutshall, Al Leonpold, Trombones. Ed Clausen, Goerge Bohn, Frank Cudwib, Jack Ferrier, George Siravo, Reeds. Gene De Paul Piano. Guy Smith, Guitar. Maurice Rayman, bass, Russ Isaacs, Drums. Savitt, Leader. Feb 3rd, 1940.

Hey white guys again, who’d guess? ^_^ Not heard here, his shuffling rhythm was interesting at times, but could get old after awhile. But this showed he wasn’t a one trick pony. Also one of the very first white bands to have a black singer. Too bad someone stuck him with the nickname Bon-Bon

A bit more on Jan Savitt if you are so interested…

http://www.parabrisas.com/d_savittj.php

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Tracks 18 and 19 from 1930’s, big Bands. Colombia Jazz masterpieces. Digitally remastered from the Original Analog Tapes of course!!!

18.Passionette. Teddy Hill and his Orchestra. Teddy Hill, Tenor Sax, leader. Bill Dillard, Frankie Newton, Shad Collins, Trumpets. Dickie Wells, Trombone. Russell Procope, Clarinet, Alto. Howard Johnson, Alto. Cecil Scott, Tenor and Baritone. Sam Allen, Piano. John Smith, Guitar. Dick Fullbright, bass. Bill Beason, drums. May 4th, 1936.

God, I can’t tell you how much I love this song! Truly a mood changer when I hear it….can’t put my finger on why it does, it just does.

19.St Louis Wiggle Rhythm. Blue Rhythm Band. Lucky Milinder, Leader. Wardell Jones, Shelton Hemphill, Henry (Red) Allen, Trumpets. J.C. HigginBotham, George Washington, trombones. Crawford Wethington, Clarinet, alto. Tab Smith, Alto. Joe Garland, Clarinet, Tenor and Baritone, and Arranger. Edgar Hayes, Piano. Lawrence Lucie, guitar. Elmer James, Bass. O’Neil Spencer, drums. May 20th, 1936

Love the way this one starts off pedal to the metal!

And the unique combo of Tenor and baritones playing in unison. Would have loved to see them perform live!

Liner notes on one cd said that in a way, it sounded like the big paddle wheels of a flat bottomed boat going down the river....

Edited by BERIGAN

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18.Passionette. Teddy Hill and his Orchestra. Teddy Hill, Tenor Sax, leader. Bill Dillard, Frankie Newton, Shad Collins, Trumpets. Dickie Wells, Trombone. Russell Procope, Clarinet, Alto. Howard Johnson, Alto. Cecil Scott, Tenor and Baritone. Sam Allen, Piano. John Smith, Guitar. Dick Fullbright, bass. Bill Beason, drums. May 4th, 1936.

God, I can’t tell you how much I love this song! Truly a mood changer when I hear it….can’t put my finger on why it does, it just does.

Me too! I want to get more of this band - and looking at the personnel, it's easy to see why it was so good.

Any ideas, Conrad?

MG

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Disc VI off of Venuti and Lang Mosaic set.

20.Tempo Di Modernage. Joe Venuti’s Rhythm Boys. Jimmy Dorsey, Cl, and some other goofy instrument(Half Clarinet?). Joe Venuti, Violin. Frank Signorelli, Piano. Eddie Lang, Guitar. June 10th, 1931.

What a weird tune for 1931!!! What can you compare it to??? Not quite jazz, but lots of jazzmen on it. Seems more like a Adrian Rollini type of thing with the odd instrumentation, and the funky violin playing(Above and below the strings?)

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Adrian Rollini-Bouncin’ in Rhythm. Topaz Jazz cd.

21. Toledo Shuffle. Freddie Jenkins and his Harlem Seven. Freddie Jenkins, Trumpet. Albert Nicholas, Clarinet. Bernard Addison, Guitar, and Adrian Rollini, Drums!!! August, 26th, 1935.

Ha, ha, ha, Stereojack, didn’t know this one!!! :lol: Though, if you had, I wouldn’t have been too surprised.

It’s the last track on a Topaz cd, a British label that usually was more expensive than anyone else, yet they has the same tracks you could find on any other compilation cd, and they often came with crappy sound to boot. But, this time they had some pretty unusual stuff, like this track.

I just know of Freddie Jenkins from playing with Ellington, but if this track was comparable to the other 5 tracks he cut as a leader, I really want to hear them!!! Sound like they'd make an excellent 52nd street band....

Don't know how much credit Rollini should get for this band's sound, but his wire brushes (I assume) sound great to my ears. Yet another instrument he could play better than average.....

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18.Passionette. Teddy Hill and his Orchestra. Teddy Hill, Tenor Sax, leader. Bill Dillard, Frankie Newton, Shad Collins, Trumpets. Dickie Wells, Trombone. Russell Procope, Clarinet, Alto. Howard Johnson, Alto. Cecil Scott, Tenor and Baritone. Sam Allen, Piano. John Smith, Guitar. Dick Fullbright, bass. Bill Beason, drums. May 4th, 1936.

God, I can’t tell you how much I love this song! Truly a mood changer when I hear it….can’t put my finger on why it does, it just does.

Me too! I want to get more of this band - and looking at the personnel, it's easy to see why it was so good.

Any ideas, Conrad?

MG

MG, don't look at me! Just because I go on and on about this recording, you don't think I went out and bought more Teddy Hill, do ya??? :crazy:

Just read up a bit more on the band, and it turns out, they only recorded 26 sides!!! 3 different cds to choose from, all out of print and expensive, at least on the used amazon in the states! :angry: Why o' why didn't I buy this a few years back???? :( Good luck on your side of the pond! (I'd go for the Hep first, but it may not be an option these days...)

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Will Bradley and His Orchestra and Ray McKinley vol 1. Hallelujah. From Hep(Out of print, but you can get it used for $7.49 now)

22. Strange Cargo. (Freddie Slack Arranger) Will Bradley, Trombone. Steve Lipkins, Joe Weidman, Herbie Dell, Trumpets. Bill Corti, Jim Emert, Trombones. Artie Mendelson, Joe Huffman, Altos. Berne Billings, Sam Sachelle, Tenor. Freddie Slack, Piano. Bill Barford Guitar. Delmar Kaplan, Bass. Ray McKinley.

Jan 17th, 1940

Funny to look back on this band and see Will Bradley getting top billing, since I think more people today know McKinley’s name more than his. Mainly a Boogie Woogie band, they cut some very interesting non B-W tracks like this Freddie Slack arranged tune.

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John Kirby Sextet. 2 Cd set from French Sony. That cd seems to be long out of print, so here is another cd with the track on it….

23.Dawn of the Desert. Charlie Shavers trumpet(And writer of this song) Buster Bailey, Clarinet, Russell Procope, Alto. Billy Kyle, Piano. John Kirby, Bass. O’Neil Spencer, drums. Jan 9th, 1939.

Another kinda-sorta classical tune. Mysterious sounding to my ears. Not all that typical of the John Kirby band. Love the tight , but not too tight playing of this band band though.

Boswell Sisters. Ok America. Alternate Takes and Rarites. Jass Records. OOP.

24. Sleep Come on and Take Me(rejected take, “B” ) Glenn Miller Arranger.

Dorsey Brothers Orch. Manny Klein, Trumpet. Tommy Dorsey, Trombone. Jimmy Dorsey, Alto. Larry Binyon, Tenor. Fulton McGrath, Piano. Dick McDonough, Guitar. Artie Bernstein, Bass. Stan King, Drums. August 6th, 1932.

I am deeply in love with all the Boswell sisters. Not in a creepy way…well, yes pretty creepy when you get right down to it…. :rhappy:

This cd was a revelation to me, since it showed how much they often compromised to get a more comercial sound.(Where’s the Melody, Jack Knapp would often say when they recorded). They did a scat version of a song called Sing a little Jingle, the released take is just about their worst, the scat cversion is great!

They stick to it a bit closer to the melody on this track, but I wanted to put a track with other jazz fellows as well.

The way they messed with the beat, totally reworked songs…. the way they could really slow down a song as slow as you could possibly go, then speed the pace up to lightning fast….love that shit!!!! :)

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Annette Hanshaw, The Girl Next Door. Take Two cd.

25.I Have to Have You. Muggsy Spanier Cornet. December 16th, 1929.

Again, chose a more jazzy track, with a great Muggsy solo. Her voice could sound so different on just about any recording of hers….since she couldn’t stay on the main Columbia label that Ruth Etting’s mob hubby, she would literally record on just about every dime store label out there, sometimes taking on a Betty Boop persona The cheaper studios perhaps played a role in her “sound” (Hearing her recordings 50-60 years later she hated the sound, said that wasn’t how she really sounded)

Her torch songs could tug at the heart in a way Etting never could….I might not convince you today, but hopefully someday a cheap cd will come along that you will take a chance on…..

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Adrian Rollini. Bouncin’ in Rhythm.

26. Shake. California Ramblers. (Edison Lateral) Roy Johnson, Trumpet. Abe Lincoln, Trombone. Bobby Davis, Clarinet, Soprano, Alto. Bunny Drown, Tenor. Adrian Rollini, Bass Sax. Jack Russin, Piano. Tommy Felline, Banjo. Herb Weil, Drums. April 4th, 1926.

Hey, I had room for one more track I found!!! Edison Laterals could record for a bit longer time, so you could hear a bit more of a stretched out solo now and then. Another track off the Topaz cd mentioned above…just quickly looking around, I find it was on another cd, I have, with much better sound quality! D’Oh!

Well, I hope you can still hear that even as early as 1926, some jazzmen were having some interesting ideas come out of their instruments, especially Adrian Rollini, and he chose the strangest , hardest to play instruments, the Bass Sax! An Instrument that Coleman Hawkins couldn’t master! He switched to the Vibes in the mid 30's for some reason.....

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216NY5MCVWL._SL500_AA130_.jpg

Will Bradley and His Orchestra and Ray McKinley vol 1. Hallelujah. From Hep(Out of print, but you can get it used for $7.49 now)

22. Strange Cargo. (Freddie Slack Arranger) Will Bradley, Trombone. Steve Lipkins, Joe Weidman, Herbie Dell, Trumpets. Bill Corti, Jim Emert, Trombones. Artie Mendelson, Joe Huffman, Altos. Berne Billings, Sam Sachelle, Tenor. Freddie Slack, Piano. Bill Barford Guitar. Delmar Kaplan, Bass. Ray McKinley.

Jan 17th, 1940

Funny to look back on this band and see Will Bradley getting top billing, since I think more people today know McKinley’s name more than his. Mainly a Boogie Woogie band, they cut some very interesting non B-W tracks like this Freddie Slack arranged tune.

51TCWT0FVXL._SS500_.jpg

John Kirby Sextet. 2 Cd set from French Sony. That cd seems to be long out of print, so here is another cd with the track on it….

23.Dawn of the Desert. Charlie Shavers trumpet(And writer of this song) Buster Bailey, Clarinet, Russell Procope, Alto. Billy Kyle, Piano. John Kirby, Bass. O’Neil Spencer, drums. Jan 9th, 1939.

Another kinda-sorta classical tune. Mysterious sounding to my ears. Not all that typical of the John Kirby band. Love the tight , but not too tight playing of this band band though.

Boswell Sisters. Ok America. Alternate Takes and Rarites. Jass Records. OOP.

24. Sleep Come on and Take Me(rejected take, “B” ) Glenn Miller Arranger.

Dorsey Brothers Orch. Manny Klein, Trumpet. Tommy Dorsey, Trombone. Jimmy Dorsey, Alto. Larry Binyon, Tenor. Fulton McGrath, Piano. Dick McDonough, Guitar. Artie Bernstein, Bass. Stan King, Drums. August 6th, 1932.

I am deeply in love with all the Boswell sisters. Not in a creepy way…well, yes pretty creepy when you get right down to it…. :rhappy:

This cd was a revelation to me, since it showed how much they often compromised to get a more comercial sound.(Where’s the Melody, Jack Knapp would often say when they recorded). They did a scat version of a song called Sing a little Jingle, the released take is just about their worst, the scat cversion is great!

They stick to it a bit closer to the melody on this track, but I wanted to put a track with other jazz fellows as well.

The way they messed with the beat, totally reworked songs…. the way they could really slow down a song as slow as you could possibly go, then speed the pace up to lightning fast….love that shit!!!! :)

CD-TT408-The%20Girl%20Next%20Door.jpg

Annette Hanshaw, The Girl Next Door. Take Two cd.

25.I Have to Have You. Muggsy Spanier Cornet. December 16th, 1929.

Again, chose a more jazzy track, with a great Muggsy solo. Her voice could sound so different on just about any recording of hers….since she couldn’t stay on the main Columbia label that Ruth Etting’s mob hubby, she would literally record on just about every dime store label out there, sometimes taking on a Betty Boop persona The cheaper studios perhaps played a role in her “sound” (Hearing her recordings 50-60 years later she hated the sound, said that wasn’t how she really sounded)

Her torch songs could tug at the heart in a way Etting never could….I might not convince you today, but hopefully someday a cheap cd will come along that you will take a chance on…..

51+FI5H+MAL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

Adrian Rollini. Bouncin’ in Rhythm.

26. Shake. California Ramblers. (Edison Lateral) Roy Johnson, Trumpet. Abe Lincoln, Trombone. Bobby Davis, Clarinet, Soprano, Alto. Bunny Drown, Tenor. Adrian Rollini, Bass Sax. Jack Russin, Piano. Tommy Felline, Banjo. Herb Weil, Drums. April 4th, 1926.

Hey, I had room for one more track I found!!! Edison Laterals could record for a bit longer time, so you could hear a bit more of a stretched out solo now and then. Another track off the Topaz cd mentioned above…just quickly looking around, I find it was on another cd, I have, with much better sound quality! D’Oh!

Well, I hope you can still hear that even as early as 1926, some jazzmen were having some interesting ideas come out of their instruments, especially Adrian Rollini, and he chose the strangest , hardest to play instruments, the Bass Sax! An Instrument that Coleman Hawkins couldn’t master! He switched to the Vibes in the mid 30's for some reason.....

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Well, that last post is fighting me editing it anymore, so let me say here thanks to everyone who took the time to listen to 46 tracks! Sorry about it being so long! Of course, I have since thought of several songs I should have put on before some of my choices, but theres always 2009 or 2010!!!

Thanks for telling me some stuff I didn't know even after listening to tracks dozens of times!!! :)

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And I got the Boswell Sisters and Adrian Rollini on te last cut. Feeling very proud of myself on those :)

Thanks COnrad - a good trip.

Luncchtime.

MG

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216NY5MCVWL._SL500_AA130_.jpg

Will Bradley and His Orchestra and Ray McKinley vol 1. Hallelujah. From Hep(Out of print, but you can get it used for $7.49 now)

22. Strange Cargo. (Freddie Slack Arranger) Will Bradley, Trombone. Steve Lipkins, Joe Weidman, Herbie Dell, Trumpets. Bill Corti, Jim Emert, Trombones. Artie Mendelson, Joe Huffman, Altos. Berne Billings, Sam Sachelle, Tenor. Freddie Slack, Piano. Bill Barford Guitar. Delmar Kaplan, Bass. Ray McKinley.

Jan 17th, 1940

So I was not too far off track with my slow train association ...

Should have gotten the Kirby track that comes next, as I have that and like that band a lot!

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