jazzbo

Best track you heard all week

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Not going to pick a single track. Every track is just a "sterling" example of what makes Silver's music so good and enjoyable.

Edited by John Tapscott

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220px-MonkParis1967.jpg

Oska T, Very striking

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Loo-Padoo - Tony Fruscella/Bill Triglia Septet (Tony´s Blues, Jazz Factory)

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"Isotope" (Joe Henderson) from

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Edited by John Tapscott

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"For All We Know" - from CD of the same title by David Hazeltine Quartet on the Smoke Sessions label.

Excellent solos by both Hazeltine and Seamus Blake.

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Section C by Cecil Taylor. The version included on a Marty Krystal/Buell Neidlinger lp. Not only exciting piano but also I really like Shepp's playing.

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It's also on the Cecil Mosaic, which was issued about six years after the Neidlinger release. Perhaps Mr. Neidlinger just wanted to get the music out there or perhaps he was testing the waters to see what would happen if he issued previously unreleased material from the Candid sessions.

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Cheers Paul. I guessed so. I don''t have the Mosaic, just the Candid cds. It's all terrific stuff, I heard Air when it first came out, it expanded my listening immediately

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'Hello To The Wind' by the Woody Shaw Concert Ensemble from the 'Complete Muse Sessions' Mosaic. Stunning !

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BJ's Lullbye - Jon Raney trio

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"Outer Space" from Roscoe Mitchell Quartet - Before there was Sound

Alvin Fielder roars, Favors with bow is pristine, Fred Berry more modern than 1965 and the leader is wonderful and searching on alto saxophone

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Jeanette James and her Synco Jazzers, The Bumps

(what a groove by everyone involved!)

Mary Lou Williams' first records were with this group. James was the vocalist of the group, later named John Williams' Synco Jazzers. This song is instrumental.

This was on Really the Blues cd 4.

Edited by Neal Pomea

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Charlie Haden+Hampton Hawes "As Long There Is Music" (Artist House)

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Bessie Jones and the Sea Island Singers/Hobart Smith/Ed Young/Nat Rahmings - "Reg'lar, Reg'lar, Rolling Under." Alan Lomax was usually concerned with recording folk music as he found it, but in 1960 he put together an ensemble to record music which would approximate the earliest African-American music. He brought together musicians who represented some of the oldest musical traditions hanging on in America at the time. Georgia's Sea Island Singers and Mississippi hill country fife player Ed Young came from isolated, majority-black areas whose music reached back to the antebellum period. White banjoist Hobart Smith, from Saltville, Virginia, learned to play from older black musicians as early as 1911, and his participation in this project was enthusiastically endorsed by the other musicians. Nat Rahmings was a Bahamian drummer whose playing, on a deep-toned drum, has just the syncopated bounce/swing you would expect early American black drumming to have.

There's no way to really know, of course, if early African-American music sounded like this. But I've always found this session to be moving and compelling, and "Reg'lar, Reg'lar, Rolling Under" is my favorite track.

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Interesting mix with Hobart Smith!

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220px-MonkParis1967.jpg

Oska T, Very striking

Is this from the Monk family, or European 'grey market' issue, octet right?

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"Marionette" by the Charles McPherson Quartet

This a video from Jazz on the Tube in recognition of Charles McPherson's birthday.

Both McPherson and pianist John Campbell marvelous solos here that should not be missed.

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The 25 minute first piece from the second set last night @ Cornelia Street Cafe

Again, if one is really into the outskirts of avant-garde combinations, NEVER leave before the second set. Decent first set, THEN:

Doom metal free jazzish improvisational skronk care of Malaby, Monder, Hebert & Williams

In a sane world it is a side long track on an upcoming underground LP that gets played on a radio station as it's awe inspiring power transcends the fact it is wholly improvised and this world will never ever hear anything like it, before, since or ever after.

Easily the best "track" I heard all week

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Chet Baker - Portrait in Black and White (from Live in Tokyo)

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Paloma Faith: Trouble With My Baby

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"You are Beautiful" from "Secret Ellington." Just an amazing duet performance, and the engineering and production transform it into something piercingly touching to me, just makes me a puddle, brings out a bundle of recent emotions in me, all great emotions to revisit.

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"Gone Jelly Blues" from Art Hodes' solo piano album, Pagin' Mr Jelly.

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