Durium

BFT #61

115 posts in this topic

Finally I am back online again, although the move is not yet complete, but the new comp is fine, and the DSL connection is

running.

Thanks for the very entertaining compilation which brightened up my day when I found out that I had to move the whole 8 x 15

feet wall of CD shelves by an inch .....

# 1 - great opener, no idea who it is, nicely over the top. Wonder if they play like this all the time. Is this a serious trad band or

a fun band?

# 2 - very nice version of "When you wish upon a star, if I'm not mistaken - great lyrical alto. Not Konitz - would like to hear more of this player.

# 3 - dangoesque rendition of John Lewis' "Django", nice arrangement and very competent, but doesn't move me emotionally.

# 4 - I'm sure I have some of this pianist - Vince Guaraldi comes to my mind.

# 5 - This sounds more like a mandolin than a guitar - with drums and electric bass? I think I once had a CD of that guy, but

can't remember his name. Oh here it comes - is it these guys? http://www.jazzmandolinproject.com/ - they know what they're doing.

# 6 - now that's more tradtional, but only on the surface. David Grisman? Nice how he keeps the balance between old and new,

blues and western swing.

# 7 - Don't like the sound and intonation of that violinist - too sentimental for my taste.

# 8 - Now that's cute, I'd say European guys. Nothing too original, but nice.

# 9 - is this "Wolverine Blues" - Rather close to the original, but well done.

# 10 - This is great - "Salt Peanuts" done older style - this shows howe closely bebop was connected to preceding jazz styles. Who is this?

Very well done - # 10 is something I would buy.

Thanks a lot!!!

p.s. edited for a typo and layout.

Thank you Mike, good to learn that you have found time to listen to the compilation.

Let's have a look at your comments.

# 1 - great opener, no idea who it is, nicely over the top. Wonder if they play like this all the time. Is this a serious trad band or a fun band?

Oh no, Aki Takase is very serious, normally, but her Fats Waller projects has some great killer dillers like this one. Aki Takase was recognized by Nate.

# 2 - very nice version of "When you wish upon a star, if I'm not mistaken - great lyrical alto. Not Konitz - would like to hear more of this player.

©Frank%20Morgan%2007.jpg[

You're right - a great alto saxophone player, but, sorry, you should search for his records as he passed away December 2007.

# 4 - I'm sure I have some of this pianist - Vince Guaraldi comes to my mind.

Great - Vince indeed with Bola Sete on the guitar. Indentified by MG

# 5 - This sounds more like a mandolin than a guitar - with drums and electric bass? I think I once had a CD of that guy, but can't remember his name. Oh here it comes - is it these guys? http://www.jazzmandolinproject.com/ - they know what they're doing.

Well, you're moving in the correct direction. Mandolin is (almost) okay - it's a bandolim and a professor in the musicology can list you dozens of differences, but I think both instruments belong to the same family. The Bandolim is from Brazil and the mandolin is from the eastern parts of Europe I believe. the bandolim player has been identified already as Hamilton De Holanda - so, not your jazzmandolinproject-guys. This young banmdolim player, who plays an enlarged instrument ( not eight but ten strings ( bandolim 10 cordas), plays normally in the Choro music style, sometimes labeled as Brazilian dixieland. Both music styles have a lot in common and I heard it for the very first time when I was in Denmark (Copenhagen) played by a group called Choro Brasil Scandinavia. Hamilton de Holanda has been in France several times for concerts and I was lucky to see him at the North Sea Jazz Festival in Roterdam summer 2007. A great concert! This tune is a samba and not Choro-related at all, but I selected this tune as it was written by one of the best Brazilian guitar composers Baden Powell. It is titled Samba Nova

Let's give the details:

hamilton-cdmusica.jpg

5. (2:50)

HAMILTON DE HOLANDA - Musica das Nuvens e do Chao

Hamilton de Holanda bandolim 10 cordas - Daniel Santiago g - André Vasconcellos b - Marcio Bahia dm

Samba Nova (Baden Powell)

Recorded Rio de Janeiro December 2003 and January 2004

A very popular Brazilian bandolim player who makes a mix between Brazilian music, like Choro and Jazz.Hamilton de Holanda at the North Sea Jazz Festival

# 6 - now that's more tradtional, but only on the surface. David Grisman? Nice how he keeps the balance between old and new, blues and western swing.

No, not David Grisham, but a Dutch fingerpicking guitar player, here playing the uke. Snoozer shared his remembrances to this great guitar player, now the guitar player of the Dutch Swing College Band: Ton Van Bergeyk

# 8 - Now that's cute, I'd say European guys. Nothing too original, but nice.

No, wrong - they are all American guys !! <_<

# 9 - is this "Wolverine Blues" - Rather close to the original, but well done.

Within a few days I'll open the curtains ....................

# 10 - This is great - "Salt Peanuts" done older style - this shows howe closely bebop was connected to preceding jazz styles. Who is this?

The idea playing new music in a traditional band sems to be rediculous, but the French Anachronic Jazz Band did do it !!

Okay, time to have a break !!

Thanks so far - I'll be back soon :rolleyes:

Keep swinging

Durium

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Finally I am back online again, although the move is not yet complete, but the new comp is fine, and the DSL connection is

running.

Thanks for the very entertaining compilation which brightened up my day when I found out that I had to move the whole 8 x 15 feet wall of CD shelves by an inch .....

the rest of the best ....

# 11 - I expected "One O'Clock jump" after that intro. Excellent player. Tatum gone boogie?

# 12 - Recognized this during the first bar. Great stuff, great way to finish the long night of playing. I love this music and the two movies concerned. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:dzfyxqrhldse

# 13 - Kind of Dolphy-inspired. Sax has a sound as if Steve Lacy were playing alto.

# 14 - some Bud Powell tune? I don't think it's Bud - too sloppily played, rather unimaginative. Not too much happening.

# 15 - I know that tune, but the name escapes me. I'm not a fan of that type of fast neobop.

# 16 - two bones, inspired by Jay and Kai, but not them. A little lackluster.

# 17 - Monk*'s Evidence played way too fast. At theat tempo they cannot place the chords correctly, rhythmically - that aspect of the tune is much more important than the changes (which were boorrowed from Just You Just Me). Sorry, you didn't understand Monk's tune ...

# 18 - a truly rosy singer - voice like Bev Kelly. Who is this?

# 19 - Uh - already over? nice closing tag!

Very well done - # 10 is something I would buy.

Thanks a lot!!!

p.s. edited for a typo and layout.

I'm back !!

# 11 - I expected "One O'Clock jump" after that intro. Excellent player. Tatum gone boogie?

No, another giant on the keys, a Canadian giant ......

# 12 - Recognized this during the first bar. Great stuff, great way to finish the long night of playing. I love this music and the two movies concerned. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:dzfyxqrhldse

Thanks Mike for identifying this track as a final reprise in the film Kansas City. Really great !! The film itself is a story that is situated in Kansas city during the 1930s, the time of Al Capone and other Mafia guys. Well, the film wasn't a hit, I believe, but Robert Altmans who produced the film invited a lot of great jazz musician from the 1990s to play in the so-called Kansas City Band or the Hey Hey Club All-Stars: Nicolas Payton, Jesse Davis, Don Byron, Curtis Fowlkes, James Zollar, Kevin Mahogany, Don Byron, James Carter, Fathead Newman, Joshua Redman, Russell Malone, Geri Allen, Cyrus Chestnut, victor Lewis and the two bass players Ron Carter and Christian McBride, both in duo on the track. ( Don Byron was the clarinet player). This band was dressed like 1930s jazz musicians and in the film they are the house band of this Hey Hey Club. In the film the story is the most important part - now-and-then you hear and you can se the band play. But .......... these guys have recorded the soundtrack during a recording session in the club in their 1930s outfit playing the traditional Kansas City Swing tunes and these shots are released on two CDs ( Kansas City - A Robert Altman Film)( Verve 529 554) and some trracks left in Kansas City Band - KC After Dark ( More music from Robert Altman's Kansas City) (Verve 537 322). Robert Altman's used the film fragments of the band to make a documentary titled Jazz'34 and you should see it !! A must have !!

Find a film fragment in my blog.

The details:

12. (4:05)

0208p16a.jpg

KANSAS CITY BAND or the HEY HEY CLUB ALL-STARS

Don Byron cl - Cyrus Chestnut p - Ron Carter b - Christian McBride b

Solitude (Reprise) (Eddie De Lange - Duke Ellington - Irving Mills)

Recorded 11th of May, 1995

# 13 - Kind of Dolphy-inspired. Sax has a sound as if Steve Lacy were playing alto

The name Eric Dolphy has been mentioned several times by others and he has do to indirect with this tune. No, the alto sax player is one of our Dutch leading alto saxophone players !!

# 14 - some Bud Powell tune? I don't think it's Bud - too sloppily played, rather unimaginative. Not too much happening.

This is a Dutch piano player, almost forgotten, who passed away a few years ago, indeed, inspired by Powell and Monk.

# 16 - two bones, inspired by Jay and Kai, but not them. A little lackluster.

You're really close to the correct answer. Maybe you should PM with King Ubu :excited:

# 18 - a truly rosy singer - voice like Bev Kelly. Who is this?

heather02.jpg

This is a young English vocalist who sings on her first album, titled I'm Old Fashioned.: Heather Simmons.

# 19 - Uh - already over? nice closing tag!

Well, The Way I Felt This Morning ...... :excited:

Thanks for your comments Mike - glad you liked it!

Keep Swinging

Durium

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Unfortunately I gather there are some rights issues surrounding the musical "outtakes" from Kansas City, so the second film of just the performances has been withdrawn. Amazon still lists it for sale, though.

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Since I had the artist and durium provided the title, I suppose track 13 comes from this recording:

Track 13

Tan

Thanks Relyle for your little research on the web. you're correct. Benjamin Herman is one of the leading alto saxophone players nowadays in the Netherlands and some weeks ago I heard him in a great concert titled Hypochristmastreefuzz, which is the name of his latest release, dedicated to Misha Mengelberg. The album by the Robert Jan Vermeulen Quartet is titled Ugly Beauty and dedicated to the music of Monk, but one track is a Misha Mengelberg composition titled Kneebus.

Eric Dolphy played his "last date" for the Dutch radio in June 1964 with a Dutch Trio featuring Misha Mengelberg on piano, Jacques Schols on bass and Han Bennink on drums. And ............... guess who's playing the drums on this Ugly Beauty album?

talkingcows-film.jpg

Enjoy the great music clip by the Robert Jan Vermeulen Quartet to promote their album Talkin' Cows, dedicated to the music of ............... Misha Mengelberg!

Let's give the details:

13. (5:36)

UGLY BEAUTY

uglybeauty-cd.jpg

ROBERT JAN VERMEULEN QUARTET

Benjamin Herman as - Robert Jan Vermeulen p - Frans van der Hoeven b - Han Bennink dm

Kneebus ( Misha Mengelberg)

Recorded Amsterdam 1-2 maart 2003

Thanks Relyles !!

Keep swinging

Durium

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Thanks for your comments, durium! I'll have to do some reading now in this thread, and I'll wait for the answers to find out about some of the titles I really liked!

I see you're from Switserland? Well - then you should recognize the musicians of one of the unsolved tracks :blink:

Durium :excited:

Ah well, I don't know all about Swiss jazz, even less so about the traditionalists... but Henri Chaix might be hidden somewhere in your collection? I only have a track of his accompanying Ben Webster, and frankly I could never identify him...

I suggested that you and Mike should contact each other according track 16. :excited:

Keep swinging

Durium

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Ok, so that's the Two Bones then? I thought it could be them, but I've heard very little of their music so far!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twobones

Or here as well, of course:

http://keepswinging.blogspot.com/2008/08/t...ado-moroni.html

(I've seen Dado Moroni once playing at a private party, a great pianist!)

Edited by king ubu

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As much as I love listening to these BFTs, I pretty much suck at getting anything right. So here goes nothing...

1. Fun at first, but too silly in the long run. Liked this the first time, but often skipped through subsequent listens.

2. Lovely version of “Rainbow.” I think I may have this. First thought it was maybe Phil Woods, but now I’m not so sure.

3. One of my favorite jazz standards. I’m tempted to say “Django” played by Django. ;) I’m not so fond of the guitarist’s little “frills” and I like this more when it opens up after about a minute in.

4. Like this one a lot. Should be able to recognize the pianist’s “moans,” but I know it’s not Jarrett. ;)

5. More from a Django-like guitarist. Like this one more than #3. Maybe Birelli Ligrene (sp)?

6. Dude can play, but I find the style a bit too quaint for my tastes. I enjoy stuff like this a track or two at a time, but an entire album would have me pulling my hair out.

7. Is Grappelli too obvious a answer? In any case, a more modern Hot Club Quintet

8. Bit old fashioned for my tastes these days, but I do love the sound of that mute and plunger.

9. Similar thoughts as track 8

10. “Salt Peanuts,” of course. Love the tune, but perhaps done in too old fashioned a way for my tastes.

11. Yeah!

12. No clue, but delicate as a flower.

13. Okay, but not doing much for me at the moment.

14. I should know this tune, but can’t think of it. Nice version.

15. Another standard. Very nice! One of my favorite tracks on this disc.

16. “Our Love is Here to Stay.” I’m terrible at identifying players, so I won’t even hazard a guess. But a very nice, straight up version.

17. Another familiar tune that I can’t identify at the moment. Monk, iirc. Feels a bit reserved and tentative, though, and I wish the players would be more aggressive in their playing here. It improves for me several minutes in (3-4 min or so).

18. The too-glib singer is fun, but the playing behind her is really good. I like this!

19. Now this I like! ;)

I haven't read the thread (yet), but I'm sure most tracks have been guessed/discussed by now. Many thanks to Durium for putting this together. Overall, this was an odd one for me. There were no tracks that I disliked, but after several listens only a few that really moved me. I think I liked this disc more the first time I listened to it as a few of the "more fun" tracks lost their appeal after repeated listens. The problem, if one wants to call it that, is due more to me than the music. Lots more trad/nostalgic jazz here than I've been listening to lately. It's not that I've "moved on" or anything, but my heads in a different place at the moment. I think I would have enjoyed this disc much more if I heard it a year or two ago (or heck, even six months ago). Still, it was fun and (upon learning the answers) hopefully ear-opening.

Thanks again!

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Since I had the artist and durium provided the title, I suppose track 13 comes from this recording:

Track 13

Tan

Thanks Relyle for your little research on the web. you're correct. Benjamin Herman is one of the leading alto saxophone players nowadays in the Netherlands and some weeks ago I heard him in a great concert titled Hypochristmastreefuzz, which is the name of his latest release, dedicated to Misha Mengelberg. The album by the Robert Jan Vermeulen Quartet is titled Ugly Beauty and dedicated to the music of Monk, but one track is a Misha Mengelberg composition titled Kneebus.

Eric Dolphy played his "last date" for the Dutch radio in June 1964 with a Dutch Trio featuring Misha Mengelberg on piano, Jacques Schols on bass and Han Bennink on drums. And ............... guess who's playing the drums on this Ugly Beauty album?

talkingcows-film.jpg

Enjoy the great music clip by the Robert Jan Vermeulen Quartet to promote their album Talkin' Cows, dedicated to the music of ............... Misha Mengelberg!

Let's give the details:

13. (5:36)

UGLY BEAUTY

uglybeauty-cd.jpg

ROBERT JAN VERMEULEN QUARTET

Benjamin Herman as - Robert Jan Vermeulen p - Frans van der Hoeven b - Han Bennink dm

Kneebus ( Misha Mengelberg)

Recorded Amsterdam 1-2 maart 2003

Thanks Relyles !!

Keep swinging

Durium

I actually like Herman a lot. I have three of his discs and several live radio broadcasts. I especially like his work with Pierre Christophe playing Byard. So many people try to do Monk albums, the prospect does not appeal to me as much - although I really liked the one track that is not a Monk track. Have you heard his disc of Mengelberg music?

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Ok, so that's the Two Bones then? I thought it could be them, but I've heard very little of their music so far!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twobones

Or here as well, of course:

http://keepswinging.blogspot.com/2008/08/t...ado-moroni.html

(I've seen Dado Moroni once playing at a private party, a great pianist!)

Bingo ...... you hit the correct album. I gave a lot of hints using the words "two bones" rather often, but no-one took up the challenge. It's the Twobones 2007 album featuring the two Swiss trombone players Danilo Moccia and Paul Haag. Both are fascinated by the music of Jay and Kai. The bass player, Isla Eckinger, the liner notes read, started as a trombone player and inspired his musical career. I bought this album because of the presence of guest player Dado Moroni, I heard in concert one and a half year ago with the Bert Joris Quartet. A great piano player.

dadomoroni-1.jpg

Let's give the details:

16. (6:13)

twobones-cd.jpg

TWOBONES 2007 - GROOVIN' BONES featuring Dado Moroni

TWOBONES

Paul Haag tb - Danilo Moccia tb - Dado Moroni p - Isla Eckinger b - Peter Schmidlin dm

Love Is Here To Stay ( George Gershwin)

Recorded live at the Salzfass in Brugg (Ch), 8th of June 2007

moroni2.jpg

Twobones 2007

Thanks King Ubu !!

Keep swinging

Durium

Edited by Durium

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As much as I love listening to these BFTs, I pretty much suck at getting anything right. So here goes nothing...

1. Fun at first, but too silly in the long run. Liked this the first time, but often skipped through subsequent listens.

2. Lovely version of “Rainbow.” I think I may have this. First thought it was maybe Phil Woods, but now I’m not so sure.

3. One of my favorite jazz standards. I’m tempted to say “Django” played by Django. ;) I’m not so fond of the guitarist’s little “frills” and I like this more when it opens up after about a minute in.

4. Like this one a lot. Should be able to recognize the pianist’s “moans,” but I know it’s not Jarrett. ;)

5. More from a Django-like guitarist. Like this one more than #3. Maybe Birelli Ligrene (sp)?

6. Dude can play, but I find the style a bit too quaint for my tastes. I enjoy stuff like this a track or two at a time, but an entire album would have me pulling my hair out.

7. Is Grappelli too obvious a answer? In any case, a more modern Hot Club Quintet

8. Bit old fashioned for my tastes these days, but I do love the sound of that mute and plunger.

9. Similar thoughts as track 8

10. “Salt Peanuts,” of course. Love the tune, but perhaps done in too old fashioned a way for my tastes.

I haven't read the thread (yet), but I'm sure most tracks have been guessed/discussed by now. Many thanks to Durium for putting this together. Overall, this was an odd one for me. There were no tracks that I disliked, but after several listens only a few that really moved me. I think I liked this disc more the first time I listened to it as a few of the "more fun" tracks lost their appeal after repeated listens. The problem, if one wants to call it that, is due more to me than the music. Lots more trad/nostalgic jazz here than I've been listening to lately. It's not that I've "moved on" or anything, but my heads in a different place at the moment. I think I would have enjoyed this disc much more if I heard it a year or two ago (or heck, even six months ago). Still, it was fun and (upon learning the answers) hopefully ear-opening.

Thanks again!

Thanks RDK that you share your thoughts and suggestions right at the end of this discussion. Most tracks have been identified and discussend, so I'll keep my comment limited to prevent double comments

1. Fun at first, but too silly in the long run. Liked this the first time, but often skipped through subsequent listens.

Sure, this kind of "cartoon" music has no deeper musical thoughts - see it as a great opener and parody of the Fats Waller music style, as artists draw cartoons from politicians.

2. Lovely version of “Rainbow.” I think I may have this. First thought it was maybe Phil Woods, but now I’m not so sure.

No, it isn't Phil Woods !!

©Frank%20Morgan%2001.jpg

3. One of my favorite jazz standards. I’m tempted to say “Django” played by Django. ;) I’m not so fond of the guitarist’s little “frills” and I like this more when it opens up after about a minute in.

I posted this Robert Normann track to introduce this unknown Norwegian Django of the North to all of you!!

4. Like this one a lot. Should be able to recognize the pianist’s “moans,” but I know it’s not Jarrett. ;)

Correct, it isn't Keith Jarrett.

6. Dude can play, but I find the style a bit too quaint for my tastes. I enjoy stuff like this a track or two at a time, but an entire album would have me pulling my hair out.

Okay, that explains why I lost my luxuriant hair during the last ten years ........... Well, for your protection I only posted one track by this great fingerpicking guitar player, here on the small uke.

7. Is Grappelli too obvious a answer? In any case, a more modern Hot Club Quintet

Yes it is - he is not !! It is a modern Hot Club Quintet and Django asked the violin player, Leo slab, top replace Grappelli when he was not able to play. You can find the story in a previous post.

10. “Salt Peanuts,” of course. Love the tune, but perhaps done in too old fashioned a way for my tastes.

It is really played in an old fashioned way - it is even an anachronism: a bebop tune played by a dixieland band.

That's for now. I'll be back soon.

thanks so far RDK

Keep swinging

Durium

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As much as I love listening to these BFTs, I pretty much suck at getting anything right. So here goes nothing...

11. Yeah!

12. No clue, but delicate as a flower.

13. Okay, but not doing much for me at the moment.

14. I should know this tune, but can’t think of it. Nice version.

15. Another standard. Very nice! One of my favorite tracks on this disc.

16. “Our Love is Here to Stay.” I’m terrible at identifying players, so I won’t even hazard a guess. But a very nice, straight up version.

17. Another familiar tune that I can’t identify at the moment. Monk, iirc. Feels a bit reserved and tentative, though, and I wish the players would be more aggressive in their playing here. It improves for me several minutes in (3-4 min or so).

18. The too-glib singer is fun, but the playing behind her is really good. I like this!

19. Now this I like! ;)

I haven't read the thread (yet), but I'm sure most tracks have been guessed/discussed by now. Many thanks to Durium for putting this together. Overall, this was an odd one for me. There were no tracks that I disliked, but after several listens only a few that really moved me. I think I liked this disc more the first time I listened to it as a few of the "more fun" tracks lost their appeal after repeated listens. The problem, if one wants to call it that, is due more to me than the music. Lots more trad/nostalgic jazz here than I've been listening to lately. It's not that I've "moved on" or anything, but my heads in a different place at the moment. I think I would have enjoyed this disc much more if I heard it a year or two ago (or heck, even six months ago). Still, it was fun and (upon learning the answers) hopefully ear-opening.

Thanks again!

Okay RDK, let's continue ......................

11. Yeah!

Yeah !!

14. I should know this tune, but can’t think of it. Nice version.

Might be, a lot of other listmates had that same feelings, but it is an own composition by the rather unknown piano player.

15. Another standard. Very nice! One of my favorite tracks on this disc.

Great you like it - so do I. This track is still unidentified!

17. Another familiar tune that I can’t identify at the moment. Monk, iirc. Feels a bit reserved and tentative, though, and I wish the players would be more aggressive in their playing here. It improves for me several minutes in (3-4 min or so).

Sure, a Monk composition, Evidence. Some contribuotrs to this discussion found it too modern ......

18. The too-glib singer is fun, but the playing behind her is really good. I like this!

heather01.jpg

I can agree in every word you say. Snoozer identified her as Heather Simmons.

19. Now this I like! ;)

The Way I Felt This Morning Was Exactly The Same ........

Thanks RDK for your listening to this album, titled Somethoing Old Something New - Keep (it) Swinging

Keep swinging

Durium

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I actually like Herman a lot. I have three of his discs and several live radio broadcasts. I especially like his work with Pierre Christophe playing Byard. So many people try to do Monk albums, the prospect does not appeal to me as much - although I really liked the one track that is not a Monk track. Have you heard his disc of Mengelberg music?

hermansquartet01.jpg

Thanks Relyles. no, I didn't hear the album, but I liked the music they played at the concert.

1182940506-0.jpg

BTW: This is his Jaki Byard tribute album you mentioned.

Keep swinging

Durium

Edited by Durium

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I have the Byard tribute disc. That is a very good one.

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Track 2 - 'When You Wish Upon A Star'. That sweet-sounding altoist has got to be Frank Morgan and the pianist sounds very much like George Cables. So I'll go for This One

Ah, yes! I knew I had/heard this somewhere!

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Funny story though, kinda. I was over for dinner to a friend's house a while back, great cook, even greater bassist, and I brought along the MJQ's Space, you know, the one on Apple that gets a little trippy on Side One. Well, ok, I put it on. The guests are all musicians, some (too many, I'd say now, with the passage of time...) tragically hip, and sure enough this one guy starts mocking, "Oh great, we get invited over to eat, then here comes the goddamned MODERN...JAZZ...QUARTET. Now we're at a freakin' DINNER PARTY!"

Well, we get into that Side One (which is where all the trippy stuff happens), & I shoot this guy a look and a raised eyebrow. He catches the gesture and says, "Hey, we're still at a freakin' dinner party. But it's a pretty hip dinner party, at least for now".

To digress... I recently bought a cheap copy of this LP, heard it for the first time, and meant to start a thread about it. Gotta give it another spin, but I wanna talk about this one later...

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