Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Earl Hines Plays Duke Ellington

27 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

According to an e-mail message I recieved from CD Universe, this CD will be reissued and available on June 30.

IMHO this is one of Hines' best recordings and for sure one of the best solo recordings in my collection.

If you like Earll Hines and/ or the music of Duke Ellington, this 2 CDs set is a must for you.

881530.jpg

Edited by B. Goren.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I have all three volumes of this, have had them for years now, and I agree, this is a wonderful set. Fantastic music executed with passion and drive. This is JAZZ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

My recollection is that there were four LPs on MJR of this material (two of them as a "two-fer" plus two single LPs). Anyone know if this CD reissue is complete?

I have all three volumes of this, have had them for years now, and I agree, this is a wonderful set. Fantastic music executed with passion and drive. This is JAZZ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

My recollection is that there were four LPs on MJR of this material (two of them as a "two-fer" plus two single LPs). Anyone know if this CD reissue is complete?

I have all three volumes of this, have had them for years now, and I agree, this is a wonderful set. Fantastic music executed with passion and drive. This is JAZZ.

The three volume set includes everything. I have the two volume set and, imo, those contain the best of the Hines/Ellington material. I imagine others' mmv.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I have the two CD issue - it's fascinating to hear how the Fatha makes the Duke's music sound as if it were his own. And still it sounds like Duke. That's greatness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I have the 3-CD set "Jazz Royalty - Earl Hines Plays Duke Ellington" on New World Records containing the following tracks:

Disc: 1

1. Love You Madly

2. Sophisticated Lady

3. I'm Beginning to See the Light

4. Black and Tan Fantasy

5. Warm Valley

6. Do Nothin' Till You Hear From Me

7. "C" Jam Blues

8. Caravan

9. Everything But You

10. Mood Indigo

11. Just Squeeze Me

12. Come Sunday

Disc: 2

1. The Creole Love Call

2. I Ain't Got Nothin' But the Blues

3. The Shepherd

4. Don't Get Around Much Anymore

5. Black Butterfly

6. Take Love Easy

7. The Jeep is Jumping

8. Heaven

Disc: 3

1. In a Mellotone

2. Solitude

3. It Don't Mean a Thing

4. I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart

5. Satin Doll

6. In a Sentimental Mood

7. Don't You Know I Care

8. I'm Just a Lucky So and So

9. Prelude to a Kiss

10. All Too Soon

I don't know whether this is the complete session. At any rate it is one of the best solo piano recordings ever!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Thanks for mentioning this Hines / Ellington material. It has been quite some time

since I heard it and this encouraged me to pull one of the CDs off the shelf and play

it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

To close the loop on this, here's the CD listing from Tommy T along with notations providing the LP from which each track came (where 1-A-2, for example, refers to Volume 1, Side A, track 2). The conclusion is that the 3-CD set provides everything on the four MJR LPs, albeit in a somewhat different order.

Disc: 1

1. Love You Madly 1-A-1

2. Sophisticated Lady 1-A-2

3. I'm Beginning to See the Light 1-A-3

4. Black and Tan Fantasy 3-A-1

5. Warm Valley 1-A-4

6. Do Nothin' Till You Hear From Me 1-A-5

7. "C" Jam Blues 1-B-1

8. Caravan 3-A-3

9. Everything But You 1-B-2

10. Mood Indigo 1-B-3

11. Just Squeeze Me 3-B-1

12. Come Sunday 1-B-4

Disc: 2

1. The Creole Love Call 4-A-1

2. I Ain't Got Nothin' But the Blues 4-A-2

3. The Shepherd 4-A-3

4. Don't Get Around Much Anymore 2-A-3

5. Black Butterfly 4-B-1

6. Take Love Easy 4-B-2

7. The Jeep is Jumping 4-B-3

8. Heaven 4-B-4

Disc: 3

1. In a Mellotone 2-A-1

2. Solitude 2-A-2

3. It Don't Mean a Thing 2-B-1

4. I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart 2-B-2

5. Satin Doll 2-B-3

6. In a Sentimental Mood 2-B-4

7. Don't You Know I Care 3-A-2

8. I'm Just a Lucky So and So 3-A-4

9. Prelude to a Kiss 3-B-2

10. All Too Soon 3-B-3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Another one to look for is the 2-cd set "Four Jazz Giants" on Solo Art. On these sessions Earl Hines is playing tributes to W.C. Handy, Louis Armstrong and Hoagy Carmichael (these three plus Hines being the four jazz giants).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Presumably these are drawn from the Audiophile LPs. Dare I ask if this set is complete? :w

Another one to look for is the 2-cd set "Four Jazz Giants" on Solo Art. On these sessions Earl Hines is playing tributes to W.C. Handy, Louis Armstrong and Hoagy Carmichael (these three plus Hines being the four jazz giants).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Presumably these are drawn from the Audiophile LPs. Dare I ask if this set is complete? :w

The set has all the music from the three Audiophile LPs "Hines Does Hoagy", "My Tribute To Louis" and "Comes In Handy", recorded in two days in 1971, a few days after Armstrong's death.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Still have the lps. The Armstrong tribute is a favorite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

The late Dick Wellstood was a friend of mine, a great pianist, a grumpy wit, a pool-shooter, a bicyclist and wonderful writer. Among his best prose was a liner note for "Quintessential Continued", Hines' second solo Chiaroscuro LP released as CR-120. I copied it out once, for a journalism student who had asked for an example of Writing-About-Jazz-In-A-Jazz-Way... I think this Hines topic is just the right place for it. (I trust this is okay with Hank O'Neal, who had the wisdom to ask Wellstood for the words).

EARL HINES -- AN APPRECIATION

Behold Earl Hines, spinner of yarns, big handed virtuoso of the black dance, con man extraordinaire, purveyor of hot sauce.

Behold Earl Hines, Jive King, boss of the sloppy run, the dragged thumb, the uneven tremolo, Minstreal of The Unworthy Emotion, King of Freedom.

Democratic Transcendant, his twitchy, spitting style uses every cheesy trick in the piano-bar catalog to create moving cathedrals, masterpieces of change, great chains of tension and relaxation, multi-dimensional solos that often seem to be about themselves, or about other solos -- "See, here I might have played some boogie-woogie, or put this accent there, or this run here, that chord there...or maybe a llittle stride for you beautiful people in the audience..." Earl Hines, Your Musical Host, serving up the hot sauce.

For all the compexity in his playing, Hines exercises fairly simple harmonic vocabulary, and in any event his peculiar stuttering rhythmic sense gives his phrasing so much force as to make harmonic analysis almost meaningless. The dissonances he uses are more the result of his fascination with the overtone of the piano than of any concern with elaborate harmonic substitutions. Accented single notes making the upper strings ring, or open fifths or octaves sounded a tone or semi-tone apart (either will do) at opposite ends of the keyboard are to him amonong the most beautiful of sounds.

His is the music of Change, based on the rhythms of the body in a graceful way unique to the older Jazz players. This may be why he is more successful as a soloist than as a trio pianist. The trio's oscarine petercision, a crutch for many, is a cage for Hines. It's need for relentless accuracy and predictable responses only betrays the tiny imperfections of freedom in his playing; when he is playing alone, these imperfections meld into a sweet flexible instrument of expression.

Hines is not a "stride" pianist. His rhythm is too straight four-four, too free. He does not possess the magisterial dignity of James P. Johnson, the aristocratic detachment of Art Tatum, the patience of Donald Lambert, the phlegmatic unflappability necessary to maintain the momentum of stride. Hines needs silence in the bass, room to let the flowers grow, space to unroll his showers of broken runs containing (miraculously) the melody within, his grace-noted octaves ("That's the way we make the piano sing!", -- Eubie Blake), and his wandering, Irish endings.

His is Freedom in Discipline, infinite choice in a limited sphere, the tension of Will vs. Material -- his is human creativity. Behold Earl Hines, King of Beasts!

--Dick Wellstood

Now, that is Earl Hines! That is Jazz Writing! That was a great pianist himself, Dick Wellstood speaking with affection, knowledge and skill. He nailed what Hines was about, and was jazz is about, in my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Ted, Thanks for sharing that. I love the piano playing of both Hines and Wellstood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I loved the Wellstood notes the first time I read them when the record was new. It is a shame the three Quintessential records haven't been reissued on cd.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I loved the Wellstood notes the first time I read them when the record was new. It is a shame the three Quintessential records haven't been reissued on cd.

Agreed! And I only have two of them on LP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I just ordered the Solo Art. Thanks for the mention, that one blew past me, though I do remember seeing one of the lps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Hines did a couple of fine solo LPs in the early '70s for the Swaggie label from Australia that are well worth searching out as CD reissues: "Earl Hines plays George Gershwin" (CD 403) was done in New York; "The Australian Sessions" (CD 405) was taped in Sydney and Melbourne studios. Naturally, that one includes Waltzing Matilda. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Earl HInes Plays Cole Porter is also recommended:

21N67TY7JTL._SL290_.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Earl Hines' playing is recommended. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I believe Mr. Nessa posted this recommendation previously, but if you don't have Earl Hines at Home on Delmark, you should.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Back to Earl Plays Duke for a minute.

Is this really a reissue?

These things have been continuously available from New World Records for a long time.

The label is run as a nonprofit, the customer service is very good, and the discount for ordering a whole lot of CDs is just dandy. Hint hint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Another one worth checking out is the "Legendary Little Theater Concert." The story, as I recall, is that his appearance there and the subsequent album really helped bring him to back in the public eye after a period of relative neglect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

The Duke Cds are on back order at CDU.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I believe Mr. Nessa posted this recommendation previously, but if you don't have Earl Hines at Home on Delmark, you should.

:tup

superd_1186870.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.