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B. Goren.

Dick Katz, 1924-2009

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Saw him not too long ago at a WNYC trubute to the jazz photographs of W. Eugene Smith. He played in a very interesting band with Teddy Charles, and was playing very well. So long, Mr. Katz. You'll be missed.

Edited by blind-blake

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he worked a lot at the West End in the late 1970s, with everybody from Dickey Wells to Earl Warren. One night Oliver Jackson was playing drums in the band and he said to Dick after a set:

"You know who you sound like?"

"Who?"

"Dick Katz."

Dick was very pleased.

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FYI:

Tom Reney will be tributing Dick tonight on his radio show,

Jazz a La Mode, on WFCR out of Amherst, Mass.

On the air from 8p-11p. Streaming at

www.wfcr.org

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Dick's comments about Oscar Pettiford in "Jazz Masters of the 40's" are really interesting. Made me feel like I knew what OP was about, at least a little bit.

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I've always thought Dick should have gotten co-authorship credit for that book; the Pettiford chapter is him, as is the Kenny Clarke, from what I recall.

other things of his to read are his articles in Jazz Panorama on Miles Davis/Walkin', and the Tatum sessions, his notes to the Teddy Wilson Smithsonian LP, and his notes to Too Marvelous for Words (Tatum) in the Smithsonian set.

Dick always complained about Martin Williams, who wasn't as musically technically savvy as Martin thought he was. But Williams did get Dick to do more writing than he would otherwise have done (I think he also notated a lot of the Smithsonian piano set).

Edited by AllenLowe

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what a unique talented voice in the world of music we have lost.

among the katz recordings indispensible to me are albums of folk music arranged for helen merrill, a couple of unique pacific jazz recordings in the late 50's with the chico hamilton quintet, folk songs for way out folk, and those tony scott recordings.

those musics are burned indelibly into my soul.

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a couple of unique pacific jazz recordings in the late 50's with the chico hamilton quintet, folk songs for way out folk,

That was cello player Fred Katz!

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glad the obit appeared - I forgot about the Sonny Rollins association - Dick was always frustrated by this, he told me he was hired by Sonny JUST before he decided to eliminate piano.

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Dick's comments about Oscar Pettiford in "Jazz Masters of the 40's" are really interesting. Made me feel like I knew what OP was about, at least a little bit.
He had a lot to say in general, having been there. Bill Triglia's still around, a good thing.

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his late 50s abc quintet recording with kenny dorham is really special, as was a john lewis tribute solo recording. dick and john were both articulate, very close and shared similar feelings about jazz performanceand composition. i still have to work my way through some katz interviews made at the time of john's death.

Edited by alocispepraluger102

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I'll never forget when we (the Jazz Institute of Chicago) had Lee Konitz bring in his nonet for a festival gig. I met them at the airport with a car and a van for the band. The car had room for me, Lee and "another". Lee and Dick Katz followed me to the car and Jimmy Knepper elbowed me out of the way to take my seat! :lol: I rode to the hotel with the other guys.

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I admire your restraint in not knocking his teeth out again...

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