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Hot Ptah

BFT 69: Listen and Discuss

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My copy's in storage, so I have no way of checking!!! "Autumn Sea," perhaps? Or "Night Nymph"?

Damn, I came *this* close to saying it several times....

Edited by seeline

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My copy's in storage, so I have no way of checking!!! "Autumn Sea," perhaps? Or "Night Nymph"?

Damn, I came *this* close to saying it several times....

Not those songs.

That is the Richard Davis album from which Disc 2, Track 11 is taken. It is on the Japanese King label. It consists of mostly duets with Junior Mance. Each musician gets two solos tracks--including the one in this Blindfold Test.

Davis has been on soul jazz albums in his career--his webpage lists them, www.richarddavis.org. They include albums led by Jimmy McGriff, Jack McDuff, Wild Bill Davis, and Junior Mance's Atlantic album, "I Believe To My Soul."

So, was it "Summertime"? Or was that just a quote? There's no tracklist on AMG.

Oh yes - a wide variety of music under Davis' belt. Some others:

Ray Bryant - Slow Freight

Shirey Scott - Mystical lady

Grover Washington Jr - Soul box

Lou Donaldson - Rough house blues; Sophisticated Lou

Reuben Wilson - Set us free

David Newman - Bigger & Better; Many facets of

Jimm Smith & Wes Montgomery - Dynamic duo; Further adventures

Eddie Harris - Silver cycles

Jimmy Forrest - Soul Street

And he was in Willis Jackson's band in the fifties, recording, I think, for Atlantic.

But is what you're saying that the track you selected is not representative of the album as a whole?

MG

Correct. Most of it is pleasant, laid back piano/bass duets, on standards or famous jazz songs. The song I selected is entitled "Summertime" on the CD booklet.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Elusive Dream is the only other original on that album that it *might* be, I think...so that's my last guess.

do you have the brand-new CD reissue, or did you rip this from vinyl? (Which is all I have...)

Edited by seeline

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Elusive Dream is the only other original on that album that it *might* be, I think...so that's my last guess.

do you have the brand-new CD reissue, or did you rip this from vinyl? (Which is all I have...)

It is Elusive Dream. I have it on CD.

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You lucky man (CD). I bet most of us have it on LP, if at all. (I held onto most of my IC vinyl for ages...)

btw, Brother Ah is also very interested in Japanese music, and has recorded and performed with a D.C.-area koto player. That's the main reason that I threw his name out there, a while back...

Edited to add: IIRC, Toshiko worked up Elusive Dream as an extended big-band piece (on Ten Gallon Shuffle, maybe?) that's much more complex than this recording would suggest...

I was wrong about the album (and the piece...) - it's on Salted Gingko Nuts

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Edited by seeline

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That's a gorgeous tone Lew has on flute.

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That's a gorgeous tone Lew has on flute.

Yes - to my way of thinking, he's a superb flutist. His tenor playing has never done much for me, though - tone and vibrato both are hard to listen to, imo.

*

HP, I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that Disc One, tk. 9 is something by Philip Johnston (ss), or at least, that he's playing... It has that vibe, a bit. (Though definitely not one of Forrester's projects, as you said earlier.) That's not Claire Daly on bari, by any chance, is it? (btw, I didn't realize that Johnston was living in Australia now - just checked his MySpace page.)

Edited by seeline

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TRACK TWO - HA! "Flowers For Albert" as ska! WT_EFFIN'_F?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? Totally unaware of this: http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:hifqxqyhldje until now! Murray's time is better than often over this groove, hell it BETTER be, ya' know? Ska is not something I've played, but the locked-in-ness of the groove has always been appealing to me. Some day, maybe.

Dude, if you EVER start a ska band, PLEASE let me audition to be the bass player! Or maybe you & I could start our own ska band. Think Greg would like to play ska? A jazz-ska quartet! Ah, to dream.....

TRACK FOUR - Detective-ated: http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:wzfoxqljldje Another example of playing the piano as opposed to just playing some music on it. Teddy wislon was a quiet master, but an unmistakable master. His left hand was often good for some fleeting, easily missed harmonic gamesmanship. That right hand could tell you one thing, but the left hand could make it mean something different than you thought it meant. Not everybody can do that. Gentleman Teddy Wilson was also Tough Teddy Wilson!

Preach it, brother!

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That's a gorgeous tone Lew has on flute.

Yes - to my way of thinking, he's a superb flutist. His tenor playing has never done much for me, though - tone and vibrato both are hard to listen to, imo.

*

HP, I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that Disc One, tk. 9 is something by Philip Johnston (ss), or at least, that he's playing... It has that vibe, a bit. (Though definitely not one of Forrester's projects, as you said earlier.) That's not Claire Daly on bari, by any chance, is it? (btw, I didn't realize that Johnston was living in Australia now - just checked his MySpace page.)

It IS by Phillip Johnston. It is not Claire Daly on baritone. Now we need the song and album. seeline, you are a master at this game! I continue to be impressed with your knowledge. Between you and jeffcrom, the two of you have guessed most of the artists!

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Wow, lots of comments really quick. I am behind! Life sneaks up on ya', eh? I'm flyin' blind here, first listen is while typing. No time before nw, sorry.

Anyway, the usual thanks & disclaimers firmly in place, let's see what we have here...

DISC ONE

TRACK ONE - Brass! Not very subtle, but not everything is in life...that melody sounds familiar somehow...yeah, the first bit of it reminds me of "Ferry 'Cross the Mersey", which is of course NOT what this is......is this Pete Rugolo or Johnny Richards? Sounds like a bunch of ex-Kentonites, Milt Bernhardt on trombone? There's one little rip he does that reminds me of a thing he did on "Machito"...Sounds like "functional" music of some sort, like a movie or TV theme. Issues of taste aside, I can't find fault with how it's played. Would that all scored music was played as true to the writer's intent as this appears to have been.

It's not Rugolo or Richards. Not Milt Bernhardt on trombone.

TRACK TWO - oh-HO! I like the idea...I'd like the reality if the tempo were a little faster. I think that's a real drummer, and I think I might like a drum machine better in terms of texture...and I think I might like synths better than the horns, again, strictly in terms of texture. But I do like the idea, like it a lot, it reminds me of Maynard & Don Ellis & Woody in the early 70s confronting the newer rhythms with energy rather than embarrassment. I think that's a good thing to do, as a rule. And this has that whole acid-jazz, drum 'n bass thing informing it, and I like that stuff, so yeah, let's do that. Why not? The [problem I have is with the texture - it sounds more old-fashioned than it needs to because of the instrumentation. Zawinul pretty much shifted the paradigm for textures in "ensemble" writing,even though he was the ensemble himself, contradictory as that is. But having said all that, I bet this would be a gas to hear live. Big bands need to be heard live. But good luck finding one. All told, I like this, like the energy, like the stubbornness of it, hell it might even be a really good college lab band, although I think not, since there is an organ.

It's not a college lab band, Maynard, Don Ellis or Woody.

TRACK THREE - You got me, I don't really know the stride players individually like I "should", but this is SO damn good. James P? I mean, c'mon, this cat is playing the piano, not just playing some music on a piano. Whoever it is, it's a BAAAAAD motherfucker, and a role model for anybody who wants to have a life where they can say, yeah bitches, I can do something, whaddabout you? Which, if you can get that Willie The Lion talking record, is really what those cats were about. Them Clef Club cats would not stand for no punkass bullshit "playing". Much love for ability, and more love for true pride in it. This is music that does not make excuses, would not even entertain the notion of them. MAXIMUM love, then!

It's James P. I agree, he is BAAAAAD! In fact, this is one of the BAAAAADest songs I have ever heard! It comes from a four song session recorded by James P. in 1930 for Decca. Allen Lowe used another one of those four songs for his Devillin' Tune box set collection. Those four songs by James P. in 1930--to me, it doesn't get better. It can't get better.

TRACK FOUR - "Somebody Loves Me", great song to blow on, goes a lot of places, all of them sensible, telling a story as they go along, Not too hard to detectiveize this one: http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:fxfqxqtdldte or http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:0zfrxqealdde and Eddie South was a beautiful violinist. Django was too.

Yes, it is Eddie South and Django.

TRACK FIVE - Sounds familiar, but....not. This pianist uses the pedals more than the one on #3. The result is less crispness, less upside-your-head-ness, which is all good, but I'm just sayin'...time change, attitudes change, this is necessary. I just think it's good to be aware of the whats, whens and whys. It breeds both pride and humility, the great yin & yang of character. This player definitely has character.

No one has guessed this one, which surprises me a little.

TRACK SIX - ALL RIGHT! Who the hell is this? Somebody who gets it, that's who! The difference between this & #2 is ultimately texture. Texture and color. Hell, we didn't have a color TV until I was 11, but now we got 1080p hi-def in the house. B&W analog still speaks, and profoundly, but of then, not of now. The message carries over, but...who the hell would watch - should watch - some of those badass NatGeo hi-def "nature" shows in B&W analog? This ain't Joe Zawinul, but Joe understood, as did Miles, & Ellington, & Gil Evans & not really all that many others that color and texture are as integral a part of music as harmony & melody. Hell, besides the masterpieces, Duke wrote a big bunch of "lesser" things that come off as profound simply because of how he spoke the language of color and texture. That shit matters, and whoever this is grasps that quite nicely,as well as that, oh by the way, rhythm is also a texture!

I thought you might like this one! Another one that no one has guessed.

TRACK SEVEN - Crepuscule With Nellie. Not Monk, although quite respectful. It's a great composition.

TRACK EIGHT - Wow, you know those "jungle" sounds the ensemble played on "Africa", on Africa Brass? Same thing, only...NOT!

TRACK NINE - Kept going back and forth between liking this one ok & kind of being annoyed at it for never really going anywhere distinctive and/or significant. then the alto came in, and...you know, alto is one of those things where it's gotta be really good...same thing with slide guitar...

TRACK TEN - Gotta be some Ra. Beautiful. Ra's music so often had this massive subliminal bottom end that hung there and held everything in place while everything else darted around it. Ra understood vibrations & overtones and all that, that's what that was all about, using the science of sound to make it three-dimensional even though you couldn't see it. John Gilmore! God, could that man play some music!

It is Sun Ra. No one has identified the album or song title yet.

TRACK ELEVEN - Perfectly fine, but as I sit here right now, I'm just not in the mood for it. My problem, totally.

TRACK TWELVE - Wow....pretty "ragged", but really together in terms of speaking. That's really a "lost world" now, the story being told here..no matter how much you hear, there's no way to get it like it was then, so imaginations and projections take over, and who knows how "right" any of them are, or even if they need to be. What I can hear is the focus of trying to make it all work, of playing all those parts, and...what did you really have to go by back then? Pretty impressive for me, just the notion of doing it, much less actually doing it.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Somebody who loves Lester Bowie (gee, that really narrows it down, doesn't it...). Pianist, YEAH! It's like he's basically a Herbie guy, but he filters it through all these other lenses... Tenor player had a random act of Gilmore coming in right after the piano solo, but that ain't Gilmore, in so many ways... And that ain't Lester. But oh well. I'm kinda feelin' this one, so all is well. That head is kinda Sam Rivers-ish, but that ain't Sam on tenor unless he was recorded by demons. And that piano player is intriguing, to say the least. Let me go way out on a limb & guess Dave Kikoski, because the vibe here is like that which he brought to Monday Michiru's Epsiodes In Color album.

Your guess is not correct.

TRACK FOURTEEN - Awwwwwww....that's CUTE! I don't particularly dig cute, but...it's like Sons Of Santos Brother or something. Exept...that keyboard sounds like Ra, which would just be so HYPER weird...and disconcerting. But wait...that rhythm track at the end, that's tape-manipulated. But ultimately, it's cute.

There is no tape manipulation on this song, as far as I know. I think it was recorded in a live take.

TRACK FIFTEEN - You scared me, I though it was gonna be "Stormy Weather" again! Was Charlie Barnett ever a Bob Wills sideman?

No Charlie Barnett. It IS Bob Wills. You are the first to identify him. Now what is the song title?

TRACK SIXTEEN - Oh wow, didn't somebody else have a cut from this album a few months ago? I gotta get this. That arrangement, especially that intro, is freakin' iconic. Ernie Wilkins, take a bow! I dig the recording on this too, nice and roomy. Yeah, I gotta get this one.

DISC TWO

TRACK ONE - Interesting...Brazillian, George Russell, 70s LA soundtrack/studiojazz, "the dreared bass direct", it's all here, and it all holds together, against some fairly formidable odds. Kudos to all involved, because there's any # of points where this thing could have gone totally off the tracks, especially considering the length of the track, but it never did.

It is George Russell. jeffcrom previously identified the album and song title.

TRACK TWO - HA! "Flowers For Albert" as ska! WT_EFFIN'_F?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? Totally unaware of this: http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:hifqxqyhldje until now! Murray's time is better than often over this groove, hell it BETTER be, ya' know? Ska is not something I've played, but the locked-in-ness of the groove has always been appealing to me. Some day, maybe. I think it's a good thing, in every way, to have a solid intimate experience with dance music(s). I think it makes you a better musician and a better person. Now, can you imagine SONNY ROLLINS playing on this record? WHOA!!!! But David Murray sounds pretty fine, for real.

You are correct. I heard this album playing in a music store when it first came out. I went to the counter and said, I'm buying this, no matter what it is or who is playing on it. The clerk said that every time they had played it, someone had walked up and bought it.

TRACK THREE - This is either somebody for whom flute is their primary instrument or somebody who has done some shedding. This is not just somebody who doubles, the tone & vibrato are waaay too refined and controlled for that, and that works well to the delivery of the melody, makes it sing, more vocal-like. And it's a nice melody, delicate, perhaps slight, but well-served by the duet format. Too much elaboration in terms of setting would have killed it. Flute-Rhodes duet, can't say that I've knowingly heard that combination before, but I find it attractive, at least here. More kudos, this time for not forcing the music to try to live outside itself. There's a certain Zen to that.

TRACK FOUR - Detective-ated: http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:wzfoxqljldje Another example of playing the piano as opposed to just playing some music on it. Teddy wislon was a quiet master, but an unmistakable master. His left hand was often good for some fleeting, easily missed harmonic gamesmanship. That right hand could tell you one thing, but the left hand could make it mean something different than you thought it meant. Not everybody can do that. Gentleman Teddy Wilson was also Tough Teddy Wilson!

It's Teddy. Your link as to the album does not work on my end. Could you type out the album title that you think it is, and I will then comment? No one has identified the album, and I can't read anything on your link.

TRACK FIVE - Fine as this is, all things considered, especially the time needed to say what needs to be said, I think I'll take Teddy, at least right now.

TRACK SIX - See # 3 & make the necessary adjustments for instruments. The obvious guess is Bill Frissell on guitar, but..maybe not? I have a hard time loving either this or the previous clarinetists' tonal concepts. fine players, both, just personal taste. This is an excerpt from a longer piece?

Not an excerpt from a longer piece. You probably don't love either this or the previous clarinetists' tonal concepts because it is the same player on both songs. Don Byron has previously been identified by others. It is Bill Frisell on Track Six.

TRACK SEVEN - Dude, see....I started on sax & didn't even try to pick up a clarinet until college. You can't really go about it that way, you need to go at it the other way, start on clarinet and then move over. If you're going to do both, which, frankly, is a notion I both resented and rejected once I got my proficiency juries outta the way. Spend two years busting ass jsut to ge over on an instrument I had no intent of playing, even after Ron Brown (a Dallas guy from the early-mid 70s who got the Mercer Ellington gig before moving on to Stevie Wonder, or vice-versa, it was a long time ago) told me that if I could get my clarinet chops together, the gig w/Mercer was not out of reach because they were hurting for a clarinet player in that band then, nobody played clarinet anymore, at least not anybody who wanted the Mercer gig (which was, truthfully, not a lucrative one then). So although there are many clarinetists who I enjoy, there are many more that just do not interest me, just because it seems to me that they play the instrument first & the music second (if that). Of course, I dislike that on any instrument, but especially on clarinet. Now, this is a fine piece of music, thoughtful, challenging, exceptionally well played, but being the third clarinet track in a row PLUS having accordion, I can't give it a fair hearing, so I must recuse from the case.

TRACK EIGHT - Ronnie Cuber used to do a bunch of Latin dates. Is this one of them? Ronnie Cuber can PLAY! Ok, that last chord is an Eddie Palmieri trademark, & C8uber definitely cut some sessions w/him. Eddie Palmieri's another guy who made his own world. So it's all good on this one, especially since there's no clarinets!

Not Cuber.

TRACK NINE - That's a Columbia recording, right? Sounds like that studio. Dickie Wells, right? Trumpet, not sure of, Tenor, very fluent, but not Hawk, or else earlier Hawk. Chu Berry? Can't hear the drummer, was noise-reduction used in the remastering,or is there not one? Nice piece.

It is Dicky Wells and earlier Hawk. jeffcrom identified this as "Minnie The Moocher's Wedding Day" under Horace Henderson's name, with Wells, Henry "Red" Allen and Hawkins. He did not identify the clarinet soloist, who has not been identified. jeffcrom also pointed out that my version is in fake stereo, and pointed me to a copy with great sounding mono, for which I am very grateful, because this is a real favorite of mine.

TRACK TEN - Herbie? Probably not. I like this. It makes sense to me as a language. Plenty of meat, nothing really "simple" about it, not really. A lot of ching-chinga-ching guys would not have a clue how to play this or even where to come in to start playing it, and that's too bad, because there is rhythm galore here, rich rhythm. I would still like to hear a band like this live, not "in concert", but playing a bigass dance gig. It's necessary, because if you get the right peoples in the right places, you could get some really intense shit going on with something like this. More like this, everybody!

It's not Herbie. I am glad that you enjoyed this--some of the others who posted did not like it, and some seemed to dismiss it.

TRACK ELEVEN - More like this, too!

TRACK TWELVE - "Tico-Tico". Beyond that, I have no idea. Sounds kinda like Surf-meets-New Orleans..not really working for me, lacking a certain....core?

It is "Tico Tico", and it has been identified by jeffcrom as James Booker from "The Lost Paramount" recordings.

TRACK THIRTEEN - I hope the city gets rebuilt and comes back strong, loud, and proud, so they can go back to making music that reminds us how vital the spirits there are, instead of music that has to tell us. Or maybe it's too late for that. Shit happens, and evil sometimes wins.

Good point about too much talking about the glory of New Orleans music recently. Still, every time the guy starts talking about the gumbo, shrimp jambalaya and etouffe, I feel hungry. I love this recording for that.

TRACK FOURTEEN - This is why white people should not be left alone in groups. But that "presents nice" chick sounds like she's ready to book on out of there, if you know what I mena.

That is very funny, why white people should not be left alone in groups. The artist is no lightweight, and no one has identified him.

Ok, man, that was a lot of music to BFT all at once, but it was time well spent. Thanks for putting it all together, and thanks for sharing so much interesting music!

Thanks for your comments, Jim, which were insightful as always! I thought that you might enjoy some of the more "out-there" cuts, and you did! Did you notice that there is not a single Blue Note or hard bop cut in this Test?

Edited by Hot Ptah

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HP, I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that Disc One, tk. 9 is something by Philip Johnston (ss), or at least, that he's playing... It has that vibe, a bit. (Though definitely not one of Forrester's projects, as you said earlier.) That's not Claire Daly on bari, by any chance, is it? (btw, I didn't realize that Johnston was living in Australia now - just checked his MySpace page.)

It IS by Phillip Johnston. It is not Claire Daly on baritone. Now we need the song and album. seeline, you are a master at this game! I continue to be impressed with your knowledge. Between you and jeffcrom, the two of you have guessed most of the artists!

Ptah... I got a *lot* of the discs I've pegged as either promos or promo purchases. (The Koch Jazz people were exceedingly kind and generous when Donald Elfman was there, likewise the wonderful press person who was with Shanachie for so many years.)

At any rate, your collection clearly has some things in common with mine. :)

Edited by seeline

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Well, I get just a red X for your second link, but you have nailed it. That's it.

Walter Schumann wrote the Dragnet theme, and this Christmas song. My parents had this album and I heard it literally thousands, if not more than 10,000 times, growing up. My mother owned a few albums and played them repeatedly all day and night.

Another song on this Schumann Christmas album, "Christmas Gift", sounds to me like one of the earliest soul recordings. It's either "Christmas Gift" or the first Atlantic Ray Charles sides, for the birth of soul.

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It's James P. I agree, he is BAAAAAD! In fact, this is one of the BAAAAADest songs I have ever heard! It comes from a four song session recorded by James P. in 1930 for Decca. Allen Lowe used another one of those four songs for his Devillin' Tune box set collection. Those four songs by James P. in 1930--to me, it doesn't get better. It can't get better.

HP, can you clarify this, please. Decca wasn't started until 1934.

MG

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[

HP, I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that Disc One, tk. 9 is something by Philip Johnston (ss), or at least, that he's playing... It has that vibe, a bit. (Though definitely not one of Forrester's projects, as you said earlier.) That's not Claire Daly on bari, by any chance, is it? (btw, I didn't realize that Johnston was living in Australia now - just checked his MySpace page.)

It IS by Phillip Johnston. It is not Claire Daly on baritone. Now we need the song and album. seeline, you are a master at this game! I continue to be impressed with your knowledge. Between you and jeffcrom, the two of you have guessed most of the artists!

It's the title track from Johnston's Normalology, which is yet another album that I regret selling. His compositions are really fun!

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[

HP, I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that Disc One, tk. 9 is something by Philip Johnston (ss), or at least, that he's playing... It has that vibe, a bit. (Though definitely not one of Forrester's projects, as you said earlier.) That's not Claire Daly on bari, by any chance, is it? (btw, I didn't realize that Johnston was living in Australia now - just checked his MySpace page.)

It IS by Phillip Johnston. It is not Claire Daly on baritone. Now we need the song and album. seeline, you are a master at this game! I continue to be impressed with your knowledge. Between you and jeffcrom, the two of you have guessed most of the artists!

It's the title track from Johnston's Normalology, which is yet another album that I regret selling. His compositions are really fun!

You are correct! This album originally had much better cover art, with a collage of famous buildings and animals.

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It's James P. I agree, he is BAAAAAD! In fact, this is one of the BAAAAADest songs I have ever heard! It comes from a four song session recorded by James P. in 1930 for Decca. Allen Lowe used another one of those four songs for his Devillin' Tune box set collection. Those four songs by James P. in 1930--to me, it doesn't get better. It can't get better.

HP, can you clarify this, please. Decca wasn't started until 1934.

MG

My mistake. The 1930 recordings were on Brunswick.

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It's the title track from Johnston's Normalology, which is yet another album that I regret selling. His compositions are really fun!

You are correct! This album originally had much better cover art, with a collage of famous buildings and animals.

No kidding! I've wondered about the cover art on the copy that I got, because... it's pretty awful. ;)

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It's James P. I agree, he is BAAAAAD! In fact, this is one of the BAAAAADest songs I have ever heard! It comes from a four song session recorded by James P. in 1930 for Decca. Allen Lowe used another one of those four songs for his Devillin' Tune box set collection. Those four songs by James P. in 1930--to me, it doesn't get better. It can't get better.

HP, can you clarify this, please. Decca wasn't started until 1934.

MG

My mistake. The 1930 recordings were on Brunswick.

But a lot of us in the USA first heard the session on Decca or MCA LPs.

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It's James P. I agree, he is BAAAAAD! In fact, this is one of the BAAAAADest songs I have ever heard! It comes from a four song session recorded by James P. in 1930 for Decca. Allen Lowe used another one of those four songs for his Devillin' Tune box set collection. Those four songs by James P. in 1930--to me, it doesn't get better. It can't get better.

HP, can you clarify this, please. Decca wasn't started until 1934.

MG

My mistake. The 1930 recordings were on Brunswick.

But a lot of us in the USA first heard the session on Decca or MCA LPs.

And the common CD reissues combine these four Brunswick sides with later Decca James P. Johnson sides. That was the source of my mistake, although I thought I had it right.

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Hot Ptah, a million apologies for not posting anything sooner. I spent the last month and a half buying a house (signed yesterday!), so now I have time again.

Before I read the reveal, I'll put my (very brief) notes here. I just wrote down which tracks I liked a lot and some very sparse guesses. Overall, I enjoyed this one a lot, and played it quite a bit on my commute, but didn't keep good notes.

Disc 1

1) A Neal Hefti arrangement?

3) The Lion? Or maybe James P.?

4) Grappeli or a sound-a-like. And Django? Then probably Grappeli.

12) Ooh, like this!

15) Like this one, too.

16) God, I know this...but can't place it.

Disc 2

4) Enjoyed this one.

9) Another one I think I know but can't place.

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Hot Ptah, a million apologies for not posting anything sooner. I spent the last month and a half buying a house (signed yesterday!), so now I have time again.

Before I read the reveal, I'll put my (very brief) notes here. I just wrote down which tracks I liked a lot and some very sparse guesses. Overall, I enjoyed this one a lot, and played it quite a bit on my commute, but didn't keep good notes.

Disc 1

1) A Neal Hefti arrangement?

3) The Lion? Or maybe James P.?

4) Grappeli or a sound-a-like. And Django? Then probably Grappeli.

12) Ooh, like this!

15) Like this one, too.

16) God, I know this...but can't place it.

Disc 2

4) Enjoyed this one.

9) Another one I think I know but can't place.

Alex, I am glad that you enjoyed playing my BFT. You are correct about James P.--what a great cut.

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