Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Hardbopjazz

Pony Poindexter, any fans?

34 posts in this topic

This video should have been recorded at the same occasion as the one with Ted Curson, Booker Ervin, and Nathan Davis posted above. My guess it was late in May, 1966, when I compare the timelines of all musicians involved. Curson, Ervin, Woode, and Bateman had recorded the "Urge" LP in the Netherlands earlier that month. Drew was back in Copenhagen by June. Strange that Poindexter mentions that TV date only in passing - but his years in Europe from arriving on August 22, 1964 were rather busy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there is an amazing live cd with Rene Thomas from '64 at the Bluenote which I just ordered. Pony is my favorite kind of alto player - thick, dense tone, lotta chords, very mobile but incredibly soulful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope you ordered the Gambit version, which has longer edits. A little more than one minute more, mostly end themes, which were edited off on the first release on Royal Jazz. This was Poindexter's gig, one of the first after he had arrived in Europe. René Thomas plays his ass off on this one. 

R-2429978-1283612539.jpeg.jpg

R-11597273-1519146442-5841.jpeg.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pulled some old photo albums - I saw and heard Poindexter play in Frankfurt on August 28, 1975 -  43 years ago, almost to the day. If I can pull them photos out without damaging them I will scan and post some. 

Edited by mikeweil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i met pony in the late 80s when he was visiting germany for the last time and stayed with a good friend of mine. we drove him to several concerts in the mannheim area where he put up a little stand to sell his book. i still have the copy he gave me, with "to bill cosby" whitened out and my name over it, lol. i remember going backstage with him in mannheim to greet art blakey. for some reason woody shaw was also there, suddenly standing in front of me, holding out his hand and introducing himself.

i remember that he didn't talk much and that he seemed not to be in good shape. he did like to smoke the green. i think he died a few months later. i have a tape somewhere with a gig he did on an earlier visit, no sax, just singing, with my buddy on piano and a local rhythm section, iirc. i could find it if it's of any interest.

 

i'd love to see the photos from frankfurt. any idea who was playing with pony?

 

and +1 to the recordings with rene thomas. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Frankfurt gig at the Palmengarten concert series was with Rolf Lüttgens (piano), Günther Hermes (bass guitar, the model Paul MCartney used to play, of all things), and Ralf Hübner (drums). Pony was in good form and shape that day. 

If you can find that tape and digitalize it, that would be nice. If you remember the date and personnel I can incllude it in the discography.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Received a copy of Alto Summit yesterday - having avoided this one over all the years. Now I know my instinct was right - not all of Joachim Berendt's Summit ideas worked well. This time I think the rhythm section - Steve Kuhn, Palle Danielsson, and Jon Christensen - was not ideal. Kuhn - a player I never seem to like - is too much in his own world of chord substitutions, and the other two are unable to groove in a more traditional manner that would have made the saxists feel more comfortable. If you listen to how great Pony had played in front of Fritz Pauer, Jimmy Woode, and Joe Nay in Frankfurt where they recorded the album with Annie Ross for MPS, you will get the idea. 

This is the only album that Poindexter does not mention in his memoirs, which is rather strange - the discography at the end of the book mentioning it was compiled by someone else. Maybe he was dissatisfied with the results. He chose "Blue and Sentimental" for his ballad feature, but sounds uneasy in comparison to his version on "Pony Poindexter Plays the Big Ones". They end the ballad medley in some freewheelin' collective improvisation that sounds totally chaotic - I wonder why they didn't do another take of this one. The saxists all feel fine rubbing shoulders - with a more sympathetic rhythm section this could have been really great. Poindexter has good words to say about all of them in his memoirs - he had encountered them at different points in his career, but must have been delighted to meet  them all together again at once. 

R-9416891-1494012217-5774.jpeg.jpg

Edited by mikeweil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mikeweil said:

Received a copy of Alto Summit yesterday - having avoided this one over all the years. Now I know my instinct was right - not all of Joachim Berendt's Summit ideas worked well. This time I think the rhythm section - Steve Kuhn, Palle Danielsson, and Jon Christensen - was not ideal. Kuhn - a player I never seem to like - is too much in his own world of chord substitutions, and the other two are unable to groove in a more traditional manner that would have made the saxists feel more comfortable. If you listen to how great Pony had played in front of Fritz Pauer, Jimmy Woode, and Joe Nay in Frankfurt where they recorded the album with Annie Ross for MPS, you will get the idea. 

This is the only album that Poindexter does not mention in his memoirs, which is rather strange - the discography at the end of the book mentioning it was compiled by someone else. Maybe he was dissatisfied with the results. He chose "Blue and Sentimental" for his ballad feature, but sounds uneasy in comparison to his version on "Pony Poindexter Plays the Big Ones". They end the ballad medley in some freewheelin' collective improvisation that sounds totally chaotic - I wonder why they didn't do another take of this one. The saxists all feel fine rubbing shoulders - with a more sympathetic rhythm section this could have been really great. Poindexter has good words to say about all of them in his memoirs - he had encountered them at different points in his career, but must have been delighted to meet  them all together again at once. 

R-9416891-1494012217-5774.jpeg.jpg

I long felt cold about that record (got it ca. 1972, or whenever BASF released it here), but have come to warm to it - some, and then mostly for Lee's playing. I agree that Pony is not heard to advantage on any of the record. It is not what one would hope for, although the sound of a sax section of four altos presents some arresting moments.

The chaos at the end of the ballad medley is caused by each hornman taking a chorus of their own feature number all at the same time. An idea that sounds better on paper than in actuality, at least here. Mingus could do shit like that and make it work, but Mingus ain't here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, JSngry said:

The chaos at the end of the ballad medley is caused by each hornman taking a chorus of their own feature number all at the same time. An idea that sounds better on paper than in actuality, at least here. Mingus could do shit like that and make it work, but Mingus ain't here.

Yeah, that's what it sounds like. Why in all the world didn't they notice?

Lee indeed sounds very good here, and his sound is a bit brighter than I was familiar with from other recordings. MPS tends to make it sound rather bright, but that does not account for all of it, methinks. He really took that challenge and responded with more edge in his playing. 

As a section they sound nice - no wonder with their common Charlie Parker heritage. They should have got a rhythm section of Parker alumni and record a Bird tribute!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.