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tranemonk

YOUR Top three all-time jazz vocalists

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Linda Ronstadt

Rod Stewart

Kiri Te Kanawa

:shrug[1]:

Lingua en cheekus, I'm sure.

mebbe - but kiri does a pretty mean "blue moon" IMHO

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Male: Billy Eckstine, Kenny "Pancho" Haggood, Earl Coleman

Female: Lady Day, Sarah, Ernestine Anderson

About more obscure female singers: I like the voice of Kay Penton, who did some sides with Tadd Dameron and Fats Navarro in the forties.

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I've just realised that no one's mentioned the great Irene Kral !!!

Edited by BillF

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Kenny "Pancho" Haggood,

Interesting. He's on my list of the all-time worst singers!

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Billie Holiday

Jeanne Lee

Sheila Jordan

Edited by jlhoots

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Kenny "Pancho" Haggood,

Interesting. He's on my list of the all-time worst singers!

Pete, I can understand you. It may sound funny for a lot of people, since "Pancho" sometimes sounds a little "doggish", but I got the impression that this kind of vocalist somehow fit´s into the boppish context. Boppers like Bird, Diz, Tadd, and even Monk seemed to like him and featured him as a kind of "contrast" between the faster instrumentals.

I still remember that great little LP "Tadd Dameron/Fats Navarro" live at Royal Roost 1948 (mistitled "Birdland 49") which I used to listen to over and over again with a friend, the only friend I had who had the same musical tastes like me. After hearing them ultra fast versions of "Rifftide", "Antropology" there was a very slow version of "Pennies from Heaven" and a cute little tune called "The Kitchenette Across the Hall". We would burst out with laugh and ...."oh man, you hear that? Oh no, sh........". After some more beer we´d listen again, and again, and after some time we´d try to sing it that way and so we found out it fits, it´s part of the game.

Collecting all those bop stuff, we soon had the sides with Monk and Milt Jackson, the Bird live from 48, the stuff with Diz (dig the film Jivin in Be bop with Pancho singing "I´m waiting for you", or Darn that Dream on Miles "Birth of the Cool".

Pete, thank you for reading and commenting my suggestion of Pancho. I really enjoyed to explain my reasons for that.....maybe strange choice....

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I reserve the right to call who I want a 'jazz' singer!!! =:-)

Nonetheless, I wouldn't call Elis Regina a jazz singer. Leny Andrade, yes.

I knew that was the one I'd get dinged on...and it had to be YOU! =:-)

bigtiny

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Kenny "Pancho" Haggood,

Interesting. He's on my list of the all-time worst singers!

Pete, I can understand you. It may sound funny for a lot of people, since "Pancho" sometimes sounds a little "doggish", but I got the impression that this kind of vocalist somehow fit´s into the boppish context. Boppers like Bird, Diz, Tadd, and even Monk seemed to like him and featured him as a kind of "contrast" between the faster instrumentals.

I still remember that great little LP "Tadd Dameron/Fats Navarro" live at Royal Roost 1948 (mistitled "Birdland 49") which I used to listen to over and over again with a friend, the only friend I had who had the same musical tastes like me. After hearing them ultra fast versions of "Rifftide", "Antropology" there was a very slow version of "Pennies from Heaven" and a cute little tune called "The Kitchenette Across the Hall". We would burst out with laugh and ...."oh man, you hear that? Oh no, sh........". After some more beer we´d listen again, and again, and after some time we´d try to sing it that way and so we found out it fits, it´s part of the game.

Collecting all those bop stuff, we soon had the sides with Monk and Milt Jackson, the Bird live from 48, the stuff with Diz (dig the film Jivin in Be bop with Pancho singing "I´m waiting for you", or Darn that Dream on Miles "Birth of the Cool".

Pete, thank you for reading and commenting my suggestion of Pancho. I really enjoyed to explain my reasons for that.....maybe strange choice....

Have you heard the Riverside album where Kenny Dorham sings? Much the same thing. It's all, I think, a specialized subset of the Billy Eckstine thing.Earl Coleman's in there too, even, in his own way, early Jackie Paris. Highly stylized conceptions of syllabifications & vowels.

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I knew that was the one I'd get dinged on...and it had to be YOU! =:-)

bigtiny

Well, you wandered around and finally found somebody who...

Highly stylized conceptions of syllabifications & vowels.

I'll raise you Al Hibbler, who I generally don't like, except the date with Rahsaan that's so surreal it's brilliant.

I'm not so hot on Earl Coleman's recordings with the original boppers (though it's a great voice), but those albums he did for Xanadu in the '70s are excellent.

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I've found Hibbler to be an acquired taste which I'm gradually attaining, but, yes, it all started with the date with Rahsaan (which, in a "my times have changed" sidelight, I first heard as a new release on a crackly, fade-y Sunday night AM jazz show out of Des Moines, Iowa that my radio in East Texas would always pick up. Also heard the Von Freeman Atlantic date for the first time on that show as well. Atlantic (or Rahsaan) must have served Des Moines well!).

Have you heard the Earl Coleman Atlantic side? It's kinda "lost" these days, but is worth looking out for.

The first time I heard Earl Coleman (other than with Bird) was w/Sonny, on "Two Different Worlds". One time my mom was visiting & I put that side on as background music while she got supper ready (Mom would always cook, couldn't keep her from it, and still would if she was able, that and sewing/crocheting/etc were her lifeblood) and as soon as that voice came out of the speakers, she let out with a OOOOOO and then said, "oh NO, Jim, that man sounds like he's one step away from being dead..."

For all I know, he might have been.

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The first two, Billie Holiday and Bessie Smith, are easy choices. For the third, Shirley Horn, but tomorrow I might like Chris Connor or Mildred Bailey or someone else just as much.

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Ladies -

Chris Connor

Irene Reid

Dakota Staton

Gentlemen -

this is hard - is Ray Charles a jazz singer? James Brown? Nat Cole? Well, so I'll say

Ernie Andrews

Slim Gaillard

Fats Waller (have to put in someone who's already been mentioned. Where's the love for the others?)

MG

While I was walking the dog, I realised that Cab Calloway should be there, instead of Fats Waller.

Edited by The Magnificent Goldberg

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Irene Reid

Do you have the Basie Jazz Icons DVD that she appears on?

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I don't really "get" Chris Connor all that much (don't dislike her, though). Can those who do tell me what they're hearing/feeling that I'm not, or is this just one of those "you do or you don't things"?

If it's the latter, hey, c'est la vie.

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I don't really "get" Chris Connor all that much (don't dislike her, though). Can those who do tell me what they're hearing/feeling that I'm not, or is this just one of those "you do or you don't things"?

If it's the latter, hey, c'est la vie.

Sexiness, subdued swing, pleasant timbre, respect for lyrics, a warm kinda cool. I love her, and she got better with age. I saw her several times in the '80s and she was fabulous.

I highly recommend this later recording:

51jWNGDSGrL._SS400_.jpg

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I give up - I never could select just three. I love so many of 'em, and my preferences are shifting from one to another all the time.

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I like most of what's been posted already - here are a few that haven't been mentioned, that I really like:

Dianne Reeves, Stacy Kent, King Pleasure, Georgie Fame

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Georgie Fame

He's loads of fun. Except for that one little hit of his during the British invasion, Americans don't really know him. I saw him with Bill Wyman's Rhythm Kings (2 great keyboardist/vocalists: Fame & Gary Brooker), and I saw him at a Brazilian extravaganza in London--he apparently had performed or recorded with some of the MPB superstars at the concert.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6q0wade1K0o

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Georgie Fame has toured a fair amount with Van Morrison, a favorite non-jazz singer of mine.

Edited by Dave James

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I don't really "get" Chris Connor all that much (don't dislike her, though). Can those who do tell me what they're hearing/feeling that I'm not, or is this just one of those "you do or you don't things"?

If it's the latter, hey, c'est la vie.

Sexiness, subdued swing, pleasant timbre, respect for lyrics, a warm kinda cool. I love her, and she got better with age. I saw her several times in the '80s and she was fabulous.

I highly recommend this later recording:

51jWNGDSGrL._SS400_.jpg

Fair enough. I've had problems with her pitch, but that was mostly the earlier stuff.

The Atlantic album she made with Maynard, however, GOOD stuff!

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I don't really "get" Chris Connor all that much (don't dislike her, though). Can those who do tell me what they're hearing/feeling that I'm not, or is this just one of those "you do or you don't things"?

If it's the latter, hey, c'est la vie.

Sexiness, subdued swing, pleasant timbre, respect for lyrics, a warm kinda cool. I love her, and she got better with age. I saw her several times in the '80s and she was fabulous.

I highly recommend this later recording:

51jWNGDSGrL._SS400_.jpg

Fair enough. I've had problems with her pitch, but that was mostly the earlier stuff.

The Atlantic album she made with Maynard, however, GOOD stuff!

I always used to think she had a pitch problem - if you say so, it must be true. But I don't care.

The Roulette album with Maynard had more interesting songs, I think. One thing she was very good at was picking great songs you'd never heard of. One on the Roulette album is 'Deep song' by the team who wrote 'I left my heart in San Francisco'. With words like:

"Where can I be headed for?

The blues crawls through my door

To lick my weary heart once more."

who needs someone singing in tune?

I agree with everything Pete said, except sexiness. Never found her sexy.

I've got to say that there might be some nostalgia in my liking for her, though I'm not sure. Back in 1960, when i was 16, I used to have a neighbour who was a captain in the USAF legal department, stationed at Northolt. We got friendly and, as I was only just beginning to get interested in jazz, I went round to his place quite a bit - the Playboy was an added attraction :) Now I thought THAT was sexy. He introduced me to Chris Connor; about the only singer/musician he played me that I actually dug immediately - the rest was mostly West Coast material. His brother was Johnny Mandel.

Why I don't think it's nostalgia is because, in 1969, I sold all my Chris Connor records and it wasn't until 1992 that I started buying her material again. And that wasn't a nostalgia trip for me; I bought them because I thought they were good records.

By the way, try 'Free spirits', particularly her version of Ornette's 'Lonely woman'.

MG

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1) Nat Cole

2) Doris Day

3) Bing Crosby

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Billie Holiday

Jeanne Lee

Sheila Jordan

Pretty close to mine, though I would want to put Patty Waters and Annie Ross in there too somehow.

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Pretty close to mine, though I would want to put Patty Waters and Annie Ross in there too somehow.

First time I went to the Monterey Jazz Festival I saw Patty Waters (as well as another favorite of mine, Bobbe Norris). Patty's sound was so brutally honest and vulnerable, I was on the edge of my seat. I had known the ESP recordings, but this was more profound. I also noticed how much she got from Ethel Waters, and when I spoke with her she confirmed this. A few years later I got to see her reunited with Burton Greene at the Vision Festival.

I saw a Hendricks & Ross reunion at the Blue Note in 1999. The pianist, David (whose last name I can't remember), had been a classmate of mine in an abnormal psych class at Brooklyn College ca. 1974, but that was the only time I saw him gigging, and haven't heard of him since.

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