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sonnymax

Vision Festival 17 - June 11-17, Brooklyn

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The best Vision Festival I remember was 2002, especially the Don Cherry tribute night.

The 2002 Vision Festival was longer and ran from May 23 to June 8. The Memorial Day concert was a celebration of the music of Don Cherry Tribute, including Dewey Redman, Pyramid Trio (Roy Campbell, William Parker, and Hamid Drake), Jayne Cortez, and Frank Lowe.

Other artists on the very impressive 2002 schedule included Joseph Jarman, Milford Graves, Kidd Jordan, Fred Anderson, Billy Bang, Joe Morris, Jemeel Moondoc, Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre, Ellen Christi, Matthew Shipp, Little Huey Creative Music Orchestra, Other Dimensions in Music, Oliver Lake, David S. Ware, Patricia Nichoson, Wadada Leo Smith, Karen Borca, Rob Brown, Christine Coppola, Doglas Ewart, Joelle Leandre, Peter Kowald, Daniel Carter, Marty Ehrlich, Sunny Murray, Sonny Simmons, Sabir Mateen, and many many more. Plus dancers, poets, and visual atists; all united in a "A Vision Against Violence".

The festival is presented by Arts for Art, an artist initiated, artist run organization dedicated to building awareness and understanding of avant-garde jazz and related expressive movements, the aesthetic of which is based on a disciplined disregard for traditional boundaries. Principal activities are the presentation of cutting edge music and multi-discipline performances, the exhibition of visual arts installations, and the organization of outreach programs. All presentations bring the arts together, not only for the health and creativity of the artforms themselves, but for the audiences as well.

http://www.jazzvisionsphotos.com/events.htm

That Jayne Cortez set included her son on drums and Bobby Bradford, the first time I ever saw him live.

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I think it is strange - it's one thing to ignore me (I'm very ignorable on the new music scene), but it's insulting not to even acknowledge someone of Ros's stature. Beyond that (and I actually had it out with Patricia about this in an open forum) - basic respect demands that you respond to people, let them know you have received their query. She's not alone in perpetuating this kind of disrespect. Not all are like this; many will tell you yes, no, maybe. But most will not even let you know they've received your info.

My experience tells me that the nonprofit jazz world, for all its professing of its own worthiness of mission, acts in much the same way as your average, faceless corporation. It's not only frustrating and disrespectful, but it tells me that they're missing a lot of what's going on in the musical world.

Edited by AllenLowe

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My experience tells me that the nonprofit jazz world, for all its professing of its own worthiness of mission, acts in much the same way as your average, faceless corporation.

Nonprofits in general. And as a writer I generally got better treatment and communication from places that paid than from literary magazines that only paid in copies.

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interesting, isn't it? This has been my experience in the music world for over 25 years. It always bothered me. At one conference I used to attend, the organizers used to like to cite me as the poster child for the active, independent jazz musician. So I stood up and said that there were at least 6 organizations in the room who would never respond to my calls or letters and materials. It was the last conference I went to, as they were somewhat less welcoming afterwards.

Edited by AllenLowe

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I hope none of the negative discussion (initiated by ME) distracts from the well deserved honors to Joe McPhee!

All the best big Joe.

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Poetry with jazz always reminds me of a horrible experience I had at a Vision Fest. Khan Jamal was playing an absolutely scorching set that was ruined by some poetess(Sherilynn Fenn?sp)who never seemed to know when to come in, when to lay out, dynamics, rhythm. If that set were recorded and her part ecxised it would have been amazing. Ah well...

I found her name:Pheralyn Dove, it was 2004

Edited by PHILLYQ

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valid point by Chuck - I was fortunate enough @ Han Bennink's 70th birthday concert to have Joe McPhee sitting next to me for the concert - and he is as nice a gentleman as I have met - plus it is always great to see a musician take a train to NYC from upstate NYC to *attend* a show and still be excited to hear music as well as perform music.

Allen - for a few years I was unable to attend Vision Fest (due to personal wreckage) and then or before I was too pissed off to attend for some of the same reasons that you cite - I have always felt the narrow-minded focus of the music was a huge hindrance to the vibe which gets so caught up in the past (despite the name of the festival) with a good amount of the music stuck in some sort of late 60's free jazz time warp.

And then the last few years the lack of a decent comfortable and acoustically friendly venue was a HUGE negative - and then don't get me started that they don't come close to following a crisp schedule....so I have attended a few nights here and there the past few years.

Do I enjoy seeing music @ Vision Fest as much as the places I normally go to?

No - but I am hoping for the 3 night I plan to attend this year that it will be a listener friendly environment - and hopefully not just for the *special people*!!

The Stone (except from May/June through AUG/SEPT when the temperature is unbearable - you think they could buy a $500 air conditioner?? - instead of the current one that blows warm air?, Jazz Gallery or Cornelia Street - all of these places I can get the best seats as long as I choose to show up early - and that is what I prefer - 3 feet from Mat Maneris' viola and 6 feet from Randy Peterson's bass drum is where I want to be.

So again NO, I imagine they will try to cordon off the front rows to the *special people* - except that I will find my way into a couple of those seats - remember the old days @ Tonic where the *special people* got all the best seats - a couple of times I was FIRST in line and I got one of the last seats available...so hopefully that BS will not go on @ Roulette.

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I will be there for a few days but will hit some shows outside of VF as well. Looking forward to a few relaxing days in NYC (staying in Brooklyn) this time around. m~

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Any suggestiosn as to used cds stores to visit in the general area around Roulette?

Edited by cliffpeterson

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maybe more later but a few comments on the first 2 nights....

saw all the bands - can do without the opening invocation but I could still hear Drake, Parker and Cleaver behind the nonsensical wailing of 3 ladies.... and I knew the drummers sounded great from my front row seat..

don't know what Kneebody is or why they were there but it had something to do with a grant....and I waited for Dunmall, Shipp, Morris and Cleaver

starts out a bit forced with Dunmall only with his tenor which is a plus - maybe it isn't even his tenor, I don't know. Shipp plays all the time, some strong stuff but too much just rolling on the keys thinking maybe it is like Chris MacGregor but I want some space - but Dunmall often makes me forget about that as he takes the tenor out to great places - then the last 30 minutes of the hour set Paul Dunmall and Gerald Cleaver find an incredible rapport and the set turns magnificent - especially when Shipp finally gives the band some space and let's Dunmall explore the full dynamics of sound and space - the final groove is subtle and immensely powerful.

Sharp was fine but the lady singer was a bit much for me

Dresser's band good with one great long form thing in the middle with all pieces meshing - highlights are Rudresh and Maroney along with the great bassist

good night

second night...fine melodic solo set by Eri Yamamoto

Farmers by Nature started off very softly and was a challenging hour (in a good way) with fine playing by all 3 - Taborn as good as I expect from him.

Darius Jones quartet - shorter set with the highlights being his playing on a couple of ballad like pieces where his sound raises the roof - Matt Mitchell is fine on piano and Smith and Dunn played well - my wife commented that this was a bit more mainstream and both of us enjoyed it - Jones remains a strong newer voice on the alto saxophone...

and THEN.....

I FORGOT

yes - I have seen a great many great drummers the past coupl of years and I did see Cooper-Moore with Cleaver's band last December - and I know these guys been playing together forever - supposedly there is nothing new BLAH BLAH

playing a tribute to the hurting Kalaparush Maurice McIntyre who is suffering with blindness from cataracts, William Parker composed the suite that they just premiered in Montreal last weekend.

and they go...

Cecil Taylor is alive, I know

Paul Bley is alive

Keith Tippet is alive

Cooper-Moore is the greatest pianist alive - well my opinion, of course - but for me last night was beyond anything I have ever seen or heard from at the 88 keys. He improvised plays the thematic material better than the 2 wonderful horn players and his excursions into the stratosphere were superhuman - and his comping!!!!!!! this guy played the phases Brown and Barnes improvising *while* they were playing them - and then the elbows, the knuckles and all of it - and he then knew how to bring the sound down, lay out, come back, build up...we heard 3 good to great pianists the first 3 hours - but Cooper-Moore is beyond any of that - genius is genius - it doesn't come often maybe it doesn't happen all the time as he was wonderful last December - but last night - more than that

but I FORGOT

Hamid Drake made a fan out of my wife for life - she knows as the *great* Gary Sisco said, that if you bring anyone with an open mind to hear Hamid, they leave knowing they have witnessed the greatest drummer in the world.

yes - for what he does, He is the greatest drummer in the world - my wife said it best - he isn't a jazz drummer like all the other ones, even her previous favorite Nasheet Waits...she might even have us coming back next Sunday..

last thing - I told Hamid Monday night that I am bringing my wife on Tuesday to see him and that I told her that she will hear a different or better version of Nasheet..he smiles..he doesn't know me

last night he remembers - I met your husband last night, etc. and as always he is the nicest person in the room - the most gracious and Barbara (my wife) gave him a hug and a kiss - and I tell him that I hope he says hello to his friend and mine - Ulrich - when he gets back in Chicago

as my wife said, it was the greatest band she ever saw - she isn't a "jazz fan" but she likes the shows - but this is a band that all should see live - Parker's themes were as strong as anything I have heard from him, Rob Brown was stupendous and Barnes was succinct and cutting - and seeing and hearing William Parker and Hamid Drake 10 feet in front of me connect like no other bassist and drummer do was shown during a duo section with Parker playing Parker and Hamid with just his hands - pure magic and telepathy.

In Order to Survive

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I prefer dancers with jazz to poets with jazz, because with dancers you can close your eyes.

*CLASP*

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Any suggestiosn as to used cds stores to visit in the general area around Roulette?

I doubt there are any these days.

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Great summation, Steve. Interesting that you skipped by Kneebody, since they've gotten a lot of good press over the last couple of years. Any thoughts? And Cooper-Moore the greatest pianist alive? As Cleo said to Akeem (Eddie Murphy) in Coming to America, "Son, lay off the drugs." ;)

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I will be there on Saturday night....the only time I could make it down for the week, but I always try to go out of my way to see Joelle Leandre.

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well I was having a little bit of fun regarding discussing the exploits of Cooper-Moore

I realize that it was a long time ago - maybe 12-14 years ago - that I saw Cecil Taylor up close @ Tonic playing with Tony Oxley - and certainly this past Tuesday what Cooper-Moore's performance compared favorably with what Cecil Taylor was playing that night as far as dexterity, speed, precision, passion and imagination.

What I heard this past Tuesday was a great performance by a great pianist.

Maybe I will simply leave it at that.

Craig Taborn is a very good/great/wonderful pianist that I enjoy greatly and have seen him 4-5 times live over the last year in a variety of settings and I always leave excited and impressed with his abilities.

He was very very good this pat Tuesday.

After seeing/hearing Cooper-Moore I almost forgot about hearing Taborn.

Edited by Steve Reynolds

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Cooper-Moore is great. Live, on the piano, or on his self-made instruments, it's a very special thing. Glad you got to catch In Order To Survive; a band I never got to see but always dug the records.

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