Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Joe

Unexpected Musician Sightings

78 posts in this topic

spent a nice few days with Mike Seeger at an old time music conference years ago; he had a wicked sense of humor, so we got on well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

spent a nice few days with Mike Seeger at an old time music conference years ago; he had a wicked sense of humor, so we got on well.

A digression, I know, but his first album for Vanguard has just been remastered and re-issued by Ace Records...and very nice it is too! It was the first folk album I ever bought, way back in the early 60s.

Edited by Head Man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nice man, a little shy and withdrawn,

as for more sightings - I've got you all beat (this is a competition, right?).

Slugs, 1969 or -'70: Jean Genet.

sometime in the late '70s: God.

I also worked a very nice series of gigs with one of the nicest people in the biz, Walter Bishop.

I sat one nice afternoon with Frank Lowe and Julius Hemphill in Julius' bedroom, near the end of his life.

We rehearsed in my living room in New Haven with David Murray; other famous musicians who rehearsed in that living room at various times: Joe Lovano, Julius Hemphill, and Doc Cheatham (actually I recorded with Doc there) -

also, not to forget my Red Lobster lunch with Anthony Braxton, a few summers ago when he asked me if I wanted to record with him; I accepted, but, alas, nothing has yet come of it.

Edited by AllenLowe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One painful musician sighting which still hurts me years after it happened (1959):

I was walking up the Boulevard Saint-Germain when I noticed an already drunk Bud Powell pestering passerbys a few meters away. Did not hear what he was asking them but it was obviously his regular request of vin rouge.

Buttercup had told me before NEVER to offer him a drink. Bad for his health she said (one of a few good advices from her). Dexter Gordon had said the same thing.

I quickly changed path so that he could not notice me (we had met and sort-of talked several times after his arrival in Paris).

I still have regrets for not having induled and offer him a glass of wine. Would have made him happy for a few seconds (and cut a few minutes from his too short life) :(

Edited by brownie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well, Brownie, just for having met Bud Powell, I declare you the winner. I am not worthy...............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

though I will say that when I met MLK, he was talking about some big speech he had to make in DC; he was worried he wouldn't know what to say; I said "Marty, you gotta dream."

wonder how that speech went....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

also, not to forget my Red Lobster lunch with Anthony Braxton, a few summers ago when he asked me if I wanted to record with him; I accepted, but, alas, nothing has yet come of it.

If Anthony invites you to Red Lobster, that means he likes you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once had a double sighting at Kennedy Airport in NYC. I went to meet someone there, and I see this guy with hair going straight up, like he stuck his finger in an electrical outlet! It was Don King. A few minutes later, while waiting for my friend I saw Jimmy Knepper and I helped him find the right gate for his flight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always considered Raphe Malik's one post on the board as an "unexpected musician sighting".

Original post can be found here.

As I recall, there was some critical discussion of his albums as a leader, and he took the time to respond.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another one "on record," in the spirit of my original post...

Then-members of Yes Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman assisting Lou Reed on his first solo LP.

1301920834_6699eae6c521fe77cc044994b8d_prev.png

I'd have to go back and listen carefully to note which tracks the proggers appear on, but, IIRC, they do more than make cameos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always considered Raphe Malik's one post on the board as an "unexpected musician sighting".

Original post can be found here.

As I recall, there was some critical discussion of his albums as a leader, and he took the time to respond.

Raphe Malik's post is a reminder (to me, at least) that there are people and lives behind the names of musicians that I sometimes criticize.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wynton appearing with Santana on a well circulated 1981 Live Under the Sky show (Wynton with electric keyboards!)

Pat Metheny with Steely Dan at a club in NY in the 90's....... not unusual but unexpected in that Pat played with them

Chick Corea with the Foo Fighters

Paul Dunmall in Johnny Guitar Watson's horn section

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Braxton always makes me feel better about my wildly unsophisticated taste in food.

also, not to forget my Red Lobster lunch with Anthony Braxton, a few summers ago when he asked me if I wanted to record with him; I accepted, but, alas, nothing has yet come of it.

If Anthony invites you to Red Lobster, that means he likes you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thought of running into Anthony Braxton at Red Lobster just blows my mind.

Bertrand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

apparently it's his favorite - I was surprised at how good the food was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw Ludwig Van Beethoven in a beerkellar in Vienna about five years back. He was muttering darkly about 'scheiße mp3s' and the fall in his royalties caused by downloading.

And once at the Cheltenham Jazz Festival I spotted a clearly distraught Gustav Holst throwing his hands in the air outside the Budweiser tent. Clearly no folk songs to collect that day.

Edited by A Lark Ascending

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw Ludwig Van Beethoven in a beerkellar in Vienna about five years back. He was muttering darkly about 'scheiße mp3s' and the fall in his royalties caused by downloading.

Brings to mind the beginning of Leonard Feather's 1977 sleeve note to Supersax's Chasin' the Bird:

"It was 1977 and Charlie Parker was just a few months shy of his 57th birthday when he came back to visit us. After greeting a few friends from his early days, men all older than he - Earl Hines, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Budd Johnson - Bird sought out the younger men who had helped to carry on his tradition: Sonny Stitt, Sonny Criss, Phil Woods. He brought them greetings from Cannonball and from Oliver Nelson, thanked them for keeping the faith, and sat in with them in an all night jam session at Storyville.

The next few months were memorable for Parker. Belatedly, he got to visit Japan for the first time, made his maiden voyages to the Newport, Monterey and Nice Festivals. He dropped in at Dick Gibson's jazz party in Colorado and broke it up. For many of us, though, the most momentous event of all was his visit to Donte's, where Bird sat in with Supersax. In Med Flory he found a kindred soul: both were Virgos, born just six years and two days apart. The sidemen, most of them products like Bird of the 1920s, were now in the prime of life and dedicated to the perpetuation of a music their distinguished visitor had fashioned.

Finally Eddie Harris walked in, carrying his new invention, the electronic saxophone that can play up to five notes at once. With Bird self-harmonized on Harris' borrowed horn and Supersax running feverishly through "Shaw Nuff" and "Chasin' the Bird", the night became a miraculous sonic bubble, due to burst in delirium at any moment."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was that before or after he did a year with Weather Report?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did Leonard Feather really write that crap? Boy, he was an asshole.

Bertrand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did Leonard Feather really write that crap? Boy, he was an asshole.

Bertrand.

Confirmed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I shared a table at the Caravan of Dreams with Prime Time (Ornette was around at the club but not sitting with us), watching Paquito D'Rivera. Denardo said they might sit in with Paquito, but it didn't happen.

Having gone to North Texas State and having also played in a band that played at Caravan of Dreams often, there were a lot of Ornette Coleman sightings as he would just come down there to hang out sometimes even when he wasn't gigging there. He opened the place as you know and also had a big hand in the bookings in the club the first couple of years. One night, my band was playing there and we were at the end of the tune and doing one of those group imrov after the head, fading out out sort of things and we saw Ornette walk into the club. I started playing the theme to Dancing in Your Head and the sax players picked up on it. Not sure if Ornette did or not.......

Actually this thread unblocked a memory long forgotten.....

My first year at North Texas State I was dating a very nice girl from Texas who was a big rock-n-roll fan. She took me to see Ian Hunter of Mott the Hoople fame. It was OK but I got bored and walked to the back of the club with the plan to go outside and get some air. Leaning against the wall right by the exit was Frank Zappa. He had no concert in the area that I knew about so it was a bit surprising. We chatted a little, nice enough guy......never asked him what the fuck he was doing in Dallas and at a Ian Hunter gig.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the mid-80's I went to what was advertised as Sun Ra with a 100-piece orchestra at some old Lower East Side ballroom. I can't vouch for the exact number of musicians, but there were a ton - Clifford Jarvis was on one set of drums. After the show, my female friend and I went into the balcony area to explore the space, and voila - there's Mr. Ra himself sitting in one of the open rooms. We chatted with him for awhile, and during the conversation one of his dancers came in and rubbed oil on his feet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I caught the end of The Blues Brother's 2000 film on tv tonight. It features a battle of the bands between The Blues Bros and a band made up of mainly Louisiana musicians but also including

Jon Faddis, Jack DeJohnette, Grover Washington and Joshua Redman!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some years ago my wife and i were on a vacation on the Caribbean Island of Jamaica. We were just getting ready to return to the airport for a flight home when

Clifford Jordan arrived at the resort. I spoke to him briefly and was disappointed that he was arriving just as we were leaving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.