ghost of miles

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At this very moment I am in a George Simenon mood, reading his "hard novel's" as he referred to his non Maigret novels.

Edited by porcy62

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1 hour ago, porcy62 said:

At this very moment I am in a George Simenon mood, reading his "hard novel's" as he referred to his non Maigret novels.

A couple of years ago I read his Act of Passion. This was one of his hard novels. 

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I read all his Maigret's novels and I loved them. A publishing house bought the copyrights of his works for Italy just before he died, they are publishing all his works in a very nice edition. It's always a pleasure holding in hand a nice book instead of a cheap paperback.

 

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Edited by porcy62

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Finished Rabbit at Rest and the novella Rabbit Remembered.

I'm reading Homer's The Iliad, alternating between Lattimore and Fitzgerald translations (read Fagles ages ago).  Lattimore is the one I would return to.

I may pull the same stunt with The Odyssey, but I haven't completely decided.

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10 hours ago, ejp626 said:

Finished Rabbit at Rest and the novella Rabbit Remembered.

I'm reading Homer's The Iliad, alternating between Lattimore and Fitzgerald translations (read Fagles ages ago).  Lattimore is the one I would return to.

I may pull the same stunt with The Odyssey, but I haven't completely decided.

Try Emily Wilson’s translation of The Odyssey. 

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1 hour ago, Brad said:

Try Emily Wilson’s translation of The Odyssey. 

Thanks.  I'll give it a look.

I only realized yesterday that Rolfe Humphries translated Virgil's Aeneid (in addition to Ovid's Metamorphoses), so I'll be on the hunt for a copy of that as well.

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17 minutes ago, ejp626 said:

Thanks.  I'll give it a look.

I only realized yesterday that Rolfe Humphries translated Virgil's Aeneid (in addition to Ovid's Metamorphoses), so I'll be on the hunt for a copy of that as well.

Here's a recent article by Daniel Mendelsohn (and book review of David Ferry's translation) about Virgil's Aeneid. 

You might also be interested in Mendolsohn's memoir “An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic.” Terrific book about him and his father and the Odyssey; he teaches Classics at Bard

Edited by Brad

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Just started Maxine Gordon's biography on her late husband, Dexter Gordon.  I purchased the Kindle version, but going to buy a physical copy instead.  Something lost in the translation on my tiny phone!

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I’ve never been fond of those e-readers. I like to hold the book in my hands. Probably the same reason I prefer CDs over downloads. However, if you’re traveling, I understand the logic in an e-reader.  

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The Murder of Rosa Luxembourg seems like it could be an interesting book. Both her and Karl Liebknecht, as well as the Spartacist movement, conjure up a revolutionary period of post WWI Germany.  But for their murder, they might have remained minor and probably forgotten figures.  

Edited by Brad

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19 hours ago, Brad said:

I’ve never been fond of those e-readers. I like to hold the book in my hands. Probably the same reason I prefer CDs over downloads. However, if you’re traveling, I understand the logic in an e-reader.  

I haven't read a "real" book in years.  The Kindle is a godsend.  You can adjust the print size, the backlighting and the font style to your liking.  For someone who likes to read in bed, there's nothing even close.  I even bought a case with a strap on the back so you don't drop it it if you nod off.  I just don't know what I'm going to do with the hundreds of physical books in my library that I haven't read and probably never will.  

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I’ve become quite a fan of Oxford’s Very Short Introduction series over the past few years. A conversation with my girlfriend the other night prompted me to dive into this one—I already have several histories and more specialized volumes on the topic, but as always, VSI is providing a smart overview that can be read in several sittings:

9780192803771-uk.jpg

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14 minutes ago, ghost of miles said:

I’ve become quite a fan of Oxford’s Very Short Introduction series over the past few years. A conversation with my girlfriend the other night prompted me to dive into this one—I already have several histories and more specialized volumes on the topic, but as always, VSI is providing a smart overview that can be read in several sittings:

9780192803771-uk.jpg

If you become more interested in the SCW, please let me know as I have many books that I can recommend.  If Hugh Thomas’ book is too long, Antony Beevor’s might be the right fit. 

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3 hours ago, Brad said:

If you become more interested in the SCW, please let me know as I have many books that I can recommend.  If Hugh Thomas’ book is too long, Antony Beevor’s might be the right fit. 

My interest in the SCW is actually longstanding! I have both the Thomas and Beevor books, though I’ve read only the Beevor. I have a number of other books as well, including several focused on the International Brigades and the Lincoln volunteers. We need to meet up for a long lunch in real life!

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1 hour ago, ghost of miles said:

My interest in the SCW is actually longstanding! I have both the Thomas and Beevor books, though I’ve read only the Beevor. I have a number of other books as well, including several focused on the International Brigades and the Lincoln volunteers. We need to meet up for a long lunch in real life!

The Thomas book is old but I think it stands the test of time. I liked Spain in Our Hearts; Adam Hochschild always does a terrific job. Yes, we must meet up some time!

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  Image result for paper ghosts julia heaberlin

Abandoned ship after 120 pages. Unenjoyable and a chore to read.

Edited by kinuta

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20 hours ago, kinuta said:

Image result for michael connelly darkness more than night

I'm reading The Black Echo by Connelly.

Edited by jlhoots

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1 hour ago, jlhoots said:

I'm reading The Black Hole by Connelly.

I'm slowly working my way through the Bosch series. 

I've enjoyed them all so far.

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22 minutes ago, kinuta said:

I'm slowly working my way through the Bosch series. 

I've enjoyed them all so far.

The Mickey Haller books are also good.

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1 hour ago, T.D. said:

The Mickey Haller books are also good.

Thanks for the recommendation.

I'll check them out but would like to finish the Bosch series first, which is clearly going to take some time.

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