Hot Ptah

BFT 104 Discussion Thread

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I have just sent out the download links to those who have already asked for one.

Let the discussion begin!

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BFT104

Well, here we go then, after the horrors of Halloween – and we only got three bunches of kids coming round for trick or treat, so I could have listened to this then :)

1 Something recognisable about this, but I can’t put my finger on it. I have a kind of early sixties Hollywood feeling about it. I’d guess about Phil Woods on sax. I know that shrill trumpet player. Don’t recognise the baritone player or the trombonist. Or the pianist, though I think I’ve heard him before, too.

2 Oh I know this one! ‘Soft’ written by Tiny Bradshaw in the Basie mode. Quite a few recordings of this tune in my collection. Funny, I was listening to this one, the original, the other night. Red Prysock soloing on tenor sax. Recorded on my 9th birthday, 6 Oct 1952, in Cincinnati. From this

http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-great-composer-mw0000675614

3 Oh, here’s another nice one. More modern than the Bradshaw, but looking back to that feel. The trumpet section sounds a little too much to me. Otherwise it’s really nice. Soloists? Alto player is quite modern and snaky.

4 Oh, interesting. Jagged band lines. Wild soloing. Basically unattractive but kind of fascinating.

5 Oh, that Bo Diddley beat! And then it’s not Bo, nor is it ‘Mustang’ :D And at ten minutes, it couldn’t be. It’s nice, is what it is. I could definitely stand ten minutes of this, as the trumpet starts and Bo turns into a lovely, hip shuffle. Oh, this I feel I ought to have in my home! Now it’s the piano player’s turn. These players are all kind of familiar to me but I’m just so wrapped up in the music, typing in time, that I really can’t be asked to identify anyone! As the ensemble comes back, we’re back to Bo. And a laid back chase.

Had to stop the BFT then, just to write some more. I’d like it if the trumpet player were Sweets Edison. I’d like it if he weren’t, too, because I can’t imagine players of Edison’s class setting out to make a record like this for ten minutes. My guess is, they’re relatively minor figures, who just wanted to do this groove on record, not with the intention of making a name for themselves, but just because it’s there. But these guys don’t sound like minor figures; they’re all saying, ‘Damn right, I am somebody!’

I also think this is kind of more recent than I expect. Lovely but way too short!!

6 Well, back to business… Is that Thad Jones on the flh? Can’t say I like the synth strings much, but the trumpet or flh player is doing such melodic stuff, I’ll forgive anything. Noting the wide intervals he’s using, could this be Woody Shaw?

Well, he should have had Johnny ‘Hammond’ Smith on organ, not the synth.

7 Old bop. No, new improved pop. Well, is that a Basie piano break? Or is it a piano break played by Basie? This is Basie, surely, a Kansas City 7? So is that Prez or maybe Paul Q?

8 Another Basie-like job. Can’t begin to guess this band, because it’s too long to be from the 78 era, or I’d say Andy Kirk.

9 Klezmer? Oy gewalt! Jeff has slipped one in behind your back, HP! Oh, now we have the Joe Henderson-style tenor and move away from Klezmer. Very good imitation Henderson. Oh, I know that guitarist’s sound! Now stop playing Klezmer and let me think!!! Bucky Pizzarelli?

10 Oh yes! Jay McShann playing summat he made up as he went along. Well, I don’t know really.

11 Time for a ciggy in the back yard. Back now. This kind of grabs the attention, but I don’t think I’m in the mood for it. Well, starts swinging at 2:30, for the pianist to come in. I know that break the strings are playing from something; reminds me of a Gershwin tune. Now it’s gone all slow again. Makes me think of the way Roberta Flack almost destroys a melody by singing it miles too slowly.

12 Piano & organ. Playing the blues but not, but then yes. The guitarist sometimes comes in when he’s not needed. And oh, there’s vibes in there. I don’t think anyone’s playing in their ‘natural’ style here. Two guitarists. I suspect this is a blues band jamming with some jazzmen.

13 An oldie. Very funny-sounding piano. Is the speed varying a bit? I’m finding the quality of the recording a bit distracting. A radio broadcast from a ballroom in the early 40s? Well, is this one Andy Kirk?

14 ‘A train’ live, before a REALLY enthusiastic audience. Not Duke Ellington though. I wonder if it could actually be Billy Strayhorn in the piano chair?

15 Very off to one side, this. Not doing much for me, I’m afraid. And even less as it goes on. Oh, is that nonsense guitar by Paul Schofield? Or is he an actor? Phew, glad that’s over.

16 Some extremely competent, but uninteresting, guitar. Not Melvin Sparks.

Some wonderful stuff in this, HP. Many thanks, particularly for #5. Please don’t tell me this is the only cut like it on the album and the rest is St Louis BAG avant material :D

MG

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BFT104

Well, here we go then, after the horrors of Halloween – and we only got three bunches of kids coming round for trick or treat, so I could have listened to this then :)

We had very few kids for trick and treating too. I could have bought much less candy!

1 Something recognisable about this, but I can’t put my finger on it. I have a kind of early sixties Hollywood feeling about it. I’d guess about Phil Woods on sax. I know that shrill trumpet player. Don’t recognise the baritone player or the trombonist. Or the pianist, though I think I’ve heard him before, too.

It is not Phil Woods. You will be surprised when you learn who this is, I think.

2 Oh I know this one! ‘Soft’ written by Tiny Bradshaw in the Basie mode. Quite a few recordings of this tune in my collection. Funny, I was listening to this one, the original, the other night. Red Prysock soloing on tenor sax. Recorded on my 9th birthday, 6 Oct 1952, in Cincinnati. From this

http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-great-composer-mw0000675614

You got it!!!!!!! I was surprised to learn that this was a hit single when it was released.

3 Oh, here’s another nice one. More modern than the Bradshaw, but looking back to that feel. The trumpet section sounds a little too much to me. Otherwise it’s really nice. Soloists? Alto player is quite modern and snaky.

4 Oh, interesting. Jagged band lines. Wild soloing. Basically unattractive but kind of fascinating.

5 Oh, that Bo Diddley beat! And then it’s not Bo, nor is it ‘Mustang’ :D And at ten minutes, it couldn’t be. It’s nice, is what it is. I could definitely stand ten minutes of this, as the trumpet starts and Bo turns into a lovely, hip shuffle. Oh, this I feel I ought to have in my home! Now it’s the piano player’s turn. These players are all kind of familiar to me but I’m just so wrapped up in the music, typing in time, that I really can’t be asked to identify anyone! As the ensemble comes back, we’re back to Bo. And a laid back chase.

Had to stop the BFT then, just to write some more. I’d like it if the trumpet player were Sweets Edison. I’d like it if he weren’t, too, because I can’t imagine players of Edison’s class setting out to make a record like this for ten minutes. My guess is, they’re relatively minor figures, who just wanted to do this groove on record, not with the intention of making a name for themselves, but just because it’s there. But these guys don’t sound like minor figures; they’re all saying, ‘Damn right, I am somebody!’

I also think this is kind of more recent than I expect. Lovely but way too short!!

It is not Sweets, and it is a more recent recording.

6 Well, back to business… Is that Thad Jones on the flh? Can’t say I like the synth strings much, but the trumpet or flh player is doing such melodic stuff, I’ll forgive anything. Noting the wide intervals he’s using, could this be Woody Shaw?

Well, he should have had Johnny ‘Hammond’ Smith on organ, not the synth.

It is not Thad Jones or Woody Shaw.

7 Old bop. No, new improved pop. Well, is that a Basie piano break? Or is it a piano break played by Basie? This is Basie, surely, a Kansas City 7? So is that Prez or maybe Paul Q?

I am not going to comment on this one unless someone positively identifies it.

8 Another Basie-like job. Can’t begin to guess this band, because it’s too long to be from the 78 era, or I’d say Andy Kirk.

9 Klezmer? Oy gewalt! Jeff has slipped one in behind your back, HP! Oh, now we have the Joe Henderson-style tenor and move away from Klezmer. Very good imitation Henderson. Oh, I know that guitarist’s sound! Now stop playing Klezmer and let me think!!! Bucky Pizzarelli?

Interesting impressions. It is not Joe Henderson or Bucky Pizzarelli here. I think that the players would take your guesses as a compliment, though.

10 Oh yes! Jay McShann playing summat he made up as he went along. Well, I don’t know really.

It is not Jay McShann, who I really like.

11 Time for a ciggy in the back yard. Back now. This kind of grabs the attention, but I don’t think I’m in the mood for it. Well, starts swinging at 2:30, for the pianist to come in. I know that break the strings are playing from something; reminds me of a Gershwin tune. Now it’s gone all slow again. Makes me think of the way Roberta Flack almost destroys a melody by singing it miles too slowly.

I find your unguarded impressions of this one most interesting.

12 Piano & organ. Playing the blues but not, but then yes. The guitarist sometimes comes in when he’s not needed. And oh, there’s vibes in there. I don’t think anyone’s playing in their ‘natural’ style here. Two guitarists. I suspect this is a blues band jamming with some jazzmen.

When you find out who is playing, you should go back and read these comments!

13 An oldie. Very funny-sounding piano. Is the speed varying a bit? I’m finding the quality of the recording a bit distracting. A radio broadcast from a ballroom in the early 40s? Well, is this one Andy Kirk?

This is not Andy Kirk, sorry.

14 ‘A train’ live, before a REALLY enthusiastic audience. Not Duke Ellington though. I wonder if it could actually be Billy Strayhorn in the piano chair?

Billy Strayhorn is a good guess, but no, it is not him.

15 Very off to one side, this. Not doing much for me, I’m afraid. And even less as it goes on. Oh, is that nonsense guitar by Paul Schofield? Or is he an actor? Phew, glad that’s over.

I did not think that you would like #15 much!

16 Some extremely competent, but uninteresting, guitar. Not Melvin Sparks.

It is not Melvin Sparks.

Some wonderful stuff in this, HP. Many thanks, particularly for #5. Please don’t tell me this is the only cut like it on the album and the rest is St Louis BAG avant material :D

I can say with confidence that there is no St. Louis BAG avant material on the album that #5 comes from.

MG

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Thanks for this BFT. I spent some time in a waiting room yesterday and got to do some listening to it. You have covered a lot of ground. Interesting and in some cases kind of weird (to my ears) stuff. That is not a criticism. My initial favorite is track 10. I know nothing about this style, so you will educate me.

I will also make my obligatory ID guess so I can get on with listening and following the comments. I will say that track 15 could be Mary Halvorson. She has a pretty unique style. Of coarse, If I'm wrong, maybe not so unique. I like this track.

This is a very busy month for me but I intend to be back.

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Thanks for this BFT. I spent some time in a waiting room yesterday and got to do some listening to it. You have covered a lot of ground. Interesting and in some cases kind of weird (to my ears) stuff. That is not a criticism. My initial favorite is track 10. I know nothing about this style, so you will educate me.

I will also make my obligatory ID guess so I can get on with listening and following the comments. I will say that track 15 could be Mary Halvorson. She has a pretty unique style. Of coarse, If I'm wrong, maybe not so unique. I like this track.

This is a very busy month for me but I intend to be back.

That is very interesting to me that you found the music weird. I was worried that I had put together a set of songs that were too normal, to the point of being mundane and bland.

#15 is Mary Halvorson! You guessed right!

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Thanks for this BFT. I spent some time in a waiting room yesterday and got to do some listening to it. You have covered a lot of ground. Interesting and in some cases kind of weird (to my ears) stuff. That is not a criticism. My initial favorite is track 10. I know nothing about this style, so you will educate me.

I will also make my obligatory ID guess so I can get on with listening and following the comments. I will say that track 15 could be Mary Halvorson. She has a pretty unique style. Of coarse, If I'm wrong, maybe not so unique. I like this track.

This is a very busy month for me but I intend to be back.

That is very interesting to me that you found the music weird. I was worried that I had put together a set of songs that were too normal, to the point of being mundane and bland.

#15 is Mary Halvorson! You guessed right!

Perhaps weird is a little overstated but I don't think mundane either. I was probably listening to track 4 when I used weird. Admittedly, I don't get out much, but this is to my ears more unusual than bland.

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Wow. I haven't had a BFT hit me in such diverse ways in ages. Some of this I loved. Some of this made me want to kick woodland animals. It's always good to be exposed to new music, but some of this really rubbed me in the wrong ways. However, the stuff that resonated falls into the "must have" category. You've successfully extracted a reaction from me. I apologize in advance is some of the comments are too strong.

Here it be:

Track 1 - A happy bop theme to start us off. Tenor and trumpet sound mildly familiar. I don't know this band. The players all strike me as maybe a tick shy of certified bad asses, but I like this a lot. Well, the piano not so much, but the rest of it I'm in. The arrangement seems a little stagnant. I mean, with all those instruments, it seems like it could present a bigger sound.

Track 2 - That's a manly tone. It's not somebody I'm all that familiar with, but I'd say he owes a nod to Illinois Jacquet. Tune seems familiar, but this is not a strong genre for me.

Track 3 - Head lasts an awful long time and really doesn't go very far. Alto sounds like Desmond in the upper register, but not at all in other registers, so I don't know. I don't care for the tune at all.

Track 4 - Mechanical as hell. Reminds me of Zappa's Jazz From Hell in that regard. Didn't make it all the way through, just not my bag.

Track 5 - A little hand jive... I like this, but the trumpet seems a little preoccupied with technique at times. Overall, it works, though. Could be Harold Mabern on piano. Tenor is almost clunky, but in a good way. Makes me think of someone like Ron Bridgewater. Not Harold Mabern, but somebody very much out of that school. I think it's maybe a little later than the Bridgewater Brothers, but I like this. Trumpet seems like one of the Wynton contemporaries to me. Maybe Marlon Jordan or somebody like that, though I'm taking to him more than I typically do those guys. Jack Walrath? The only thing that isn't hitting for me is I want the drums to go ON to something (and I didn't care for the A train quote, but now I'm just nitpicking).

Track 6 - This just isn't firing for me. Too flowery and I'm just not buying it.

Track 7 - Man, I've been missing these guys every time, but I like this style. I'll guess Alan Eager because it seems no matter who I guess when I hear this type of tone/style, I'm wrong and it ends up being him. Pianist owes Basie some royalties. Now the tenor sounds like Lester Young in the deliberate approach to the rhythm, but the band just doesn't seem to swing enough for that to be the case.

Track 8 - That trumpet (seems like there may have been two) sure sounds like Roy Eldredge to me, but again, the band doesn't seem to swing enough for that to be the case.

Track 9 - I like this in spite of the technocrat tenor. He has a bigger, warmer sound than most who play like this. However, he definitely comes out of that Brecker generation. In the beginning I had hopes this was going to be an Ahmed Abdul-Malik cut. The tenor is staying close enough to the rhythm of the accompaniment (meaning he's not getting lost in the technique stuff, though he flirts with it), and that's why this works for me. It's interesting and I want to know more about it. Can't hear the bass too well on my laptop speakers, but what I CAN hear, I like.

Track 10 - No idea. Doesn't seem like a player from the generation of this music, but a more modern player playing in the style. Not really hitting it for me.

Track 11 - Man, I swear I know this tune. I like the song, and I'm digging the piano. A little Dear Old Stockholm thrown in the middle there. I like the drums, too -- this is *alive*. I want this.

Track 12 - Sounds a lot like B.B. King's guitar, there. Sounds like Bob Berg on tenor to me. This isn't really pulling off what it's trying to be. Drums are stiff like the Cray Band. I'm almost positive it's Bob Berg. Guitar isn't over-amplified enough to be B.B. (and it doesn't seem to bite enough to be him). This one doesn't really strike it for me, either. If it IS B.B., it's him on an off day. The blues doesn't work unless somebody gives a shit, and I'm not hearing that anyone here does.

Track 13 - No clue, outside my realm.

Track 14 - Well, I've got the song, anyway. Somebody has worked awfully hard to get Ellington's trinkle down. So much so that I'm wondering if this is some perverse remix. Okay, this is bizarre... what the hell was going in the beginning? Now that piano is decidedly not him. Almost sounds like Art Tatum or Oscar Peterson there at times. Some strange festival jam? Drums almost sound like Jimmy Cobb to me. The arrangement is Duke, but that's not his guys in there. Could be Norris Turney on lead making one of the later bands. Now I'm getting a Phineas vibe, which has me leaning towards Tatum, again. Intrigued.

Track 15 - This is NOT speaking to me (well, unless you count telling me to kill the neighbor's dog). At 1:30, I'm yelling at it to go somewhere. Herky jerky, but I don't get the point. Had to fast forward into the solos, and I'm sorry I did. Hits me like Rudresh on alto, and this is doing less than nothing for me. I love this done right. This ain't it.

Track 16 - I respect the technique, I'm just not interested.

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Dot gonna foul up and miss this one like I d the last one, so...discalimars and thanks of traditional bearing both firmly in place, let's go!

TRACK ONE - Sounds like an early-mid-50s Prestige date, but no idea who...trumpeter gets one overt Dizzy-ism in that makes me think Conte Candoli, which might put us out west? I enjoyed it well enough.

TRACK TWO - Can't recall the name of this tune off the top of my head, but I'm familiar with it through a Bill Doggett version. That one hits the spot, and so does this one.

TRACK THREE - Kenton, "Dynaflow", Art Pepper & Bob Cooper, iirc. 1951(?) Made around the same time that the Innovations In Modern Music thing was going on, so this was considered a "commercial" release, and as I understand it, accomplished its goal. What can you say - all the formulas are in place & they're all executed well. It's a slight piece of writing, really, but it's played loudly with modern solos, so it worked as Kentonjazz. But really, it could have been by Kenton's Artistry In Rhythm band from the previous decade. Definitely a "regressive" thing for Kenton at the time, but it sold records and kept interest in the band for dance gigs when the Innovations thing was off, so, hey. Band's gotta do what a band's gotta do, right?

TRACK FOUR - That head is familiar, but just in spots...No idea who it might be...sounds like mid-80s, maybe? If it was a neighbor, I'd not call the police, but I don't know that I'd go over for a beer either...basically it's like yeah, I hear what you're doing and can tell that you really mean it, so keep on doing that, just don't look for me to be a regular at your gigs or anything, and all the best, for real.

TRACK FIVE - It's as if Sister Cheryl was eating a hambone! Wallace Roney? Good ideas, the trumpeter has..but I don't think that's Antoine on tenor..might be, accidentally...tenor solo's kind of a mess, really, effects and style and hiplicks, it doesn't really work, but it's so clueless about not working that I kinda dig it, like somebody trying to impress and failing so badly that they impress anyway, like "wow, that took courage. I dig courage as a free-standing quality". I do think the rhythm section is trying just a little too hard, though. Let it breathe and it will swing better, and/or as much as it can, all things considered. Not bad at all, just a little...obvious. And an "A Train" near-quote almost at the very end! Not sure about the guitar, though, ever. Don't know why it's there.

TRACK SIX - Wynton-ish trumpet playing, "modern" string writing, has the feel of a soundtrack thing...Terrence Blanchard? Trumpet playing is very clean, especially in the lower register. Some Miles-y, Clark Terry-ish thins here and there, it's good playing. And I do like the string writing. Overall effect is still slight for me though, because it sounds like "event music" rather than "life music". But as with the other thing earlier, it's working in areas that are not necessarily totally played out as far as getting through to more people, which is important, to just have sounds like this not sound WEIRD to a more general audience, so if this IS soundtrack music, I can't say but that I might not enjoy seeing the movie.

TRACK SEVEN - Lady Q? Funny how you can try to sound exactly like something, and the closer you get, the farther away you end up. I like it, but it is kinda creepy at the same time. If that's really Quinichette, I like him when he got more quirky and less literal. Then he was where he probably wanted to get to all along - had his own legit place in somebody else's very personal world.

TRACK EIGHT - The changes are kinda gimmicky, but that IS Roy Eldridge, so hey. Game Over, Eldridge Wins. Eldridge remains undefeated. That's not Budd Johnson, is it? Or is it?

TRACK NINE - I played in a band that did this Arab-Jazz thing put together by a couple of Lebanese brothers, a lot of traditional folk songs opened up for improvisation over the basic traditional grooves, and yes, there was plenty room to be had., When the club would go for it, we'd bring in belly dancers, real ones, not strippers in disguise. On rare occasions, Artis The Spoonman would sit in if he was in town and jam the shit out of these grooves. I like this kind of music, and I like what is being played here. Will there be dancers next week? Yes? Let me booka table now, please.

TRACK TEN - Piano roll of somebody famous?

TRACK ELEVEN - Richard Davis. "Dear Old Stockholm", with Chick Corea (and Bill Lee!), from The Philosophy Of The Spiritual on Cobblestone, a record well worth looking for, as are most records under Richard Davis' name.

TRACK TWELVE - Steps Ahead? With the vibes, I don't know who else to guess, other than Robben Ford or somebody like that...not really calling my name right now. This is kind of for its scene what "Dynaflow" would've been for Kenton's - a chance to play something tight and professional that damn near everybody will like, and when you make that money, you can go off onto something else for a while, at least until the money runs out. Not bad, just a little...complacent. But expertly so!

TRACK THIRTEEN - Basie! "K.C. Stride", the airshot from 44 with Prez stretching out for three of his most luxurious choruses on record is desert island music for me. This is not that, but same band, same tune, just a lot more constricted and, Jacquet in the little tenor interlude? When I sometimes mention how you can hear the Old Testament band becoming the New Testament band before they actually WERE the New Testament band, this is a good, not great, example.

TRACK FOURTEEN - Ellington w/Oscar Peterson sitting in (but not before Duke sets the pace). Gotsta be that. God do I love Duke! Did this occur in Canada?

TRACK FIFTEEN - Not sure...not sure....liking the bottom of the music, perhaps not the top, but still not sure...no, still not sure...not sure if that way of intersecting that rhythm speaks to me in a positive manner...not sure...ok, now it stirs up good, but just for some, not all...still not sure...now we gettin' all electrocharged and stuff...no, not sure...a nice sober ending and still...not...sure.

TRACK SIXTEEN - Stanley Jordan? Whatever happened to Stanley Jordan? I thought he had a bit of a vision and got it swallwoed up quite quickly by making records that were marketed to sell one thing when where he was wanting to go was someplace else altogether, some place more like this. Assuming that this is in fact Stanley Jordan, and I hear enough imprecision (of the ok variety) to make me think it is. It would be easy to brush it off as solo guitar flash or some such, but there's some meat in that hot dog as well, so eat with deliberation.

That was an interesting grouping, heard a few familiarities and many more curiosity piquers. Thanks, much enjoyed it!

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...tenor solo's kind of a mess, really, effects and style and hiplicks, it doesn't really work, but it's so clueless about not working that I kinda dig it, like somebody trying to impress and failing so badly that they impress anyway, like "wow, that took courage. I dig courage as a free-standing quality".

Man, this is *perfect*! This is how I would describe Bill Saxton on Dick Griffin's NOW IS THE TIME. Did you ever NAIL this one.

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Wow. I haven't had a BFT hit me in such diverse ways in ages. Some of this I loved. Some of this made me want to kick woodland animals. It's always good to be exposed to new music, but some of this really rubbed me in the wrong ways. However, the stuff that resonated falls into the "must have" category. You've successfully extracted a reaction from me. I apologize in advance is some of the comments are too strong.

I take this as a compliment. I enjoy your strong comments. They are honest.

Here it be:

Track 1 - A happy bop theme to start us off. Tenor and trumpet sound mildly familiar. I don't know this band. The players all strike me as maybe a tick shy of certified bad asses, but I like this a lot. Well, the piano not so much, but the rest of it I'm in. The arrangement seems a little stagnant. I mean, with all those instruments, it seems like it could present a bigger sound.

I think you will be really surprised when you find out who this is. I thought everyone knew this song, and that it was too obvious a choice. I guess not!

Track 2 - That's a manly tone. It's not somebody I'm all that familiar with, but I'd say he owes a nod to Illinois Jacquet. Tune seems familiar, but this is not a strong genre for me.

The Magnificent Goldberg has identified the artist, song and tenor sax soloist. As I stated in reply to him, I am surprised that this was a hit single in 1953.

Track 3 - Head lasts an awful long time and really doesn't go very far. Alto sounds like Desmond in the upper register, but not at all in other registers, so I don't know. I don't care for the tune at all.

Jim Sangry has identified this one. This is a band I usually don't care for much, but this is the one song by them that I really do like.

Track 4 - Mechanical as hell. Reminds me of Zappa's Jazz From Hell in that regard. Didn't make it all the way through, just not my bag.

Track 5 - A little hand jive... I like this, but the trumpet seems a little preoccupied with technique at times. Overall, it works, though. Could be Harold Mabern on piano. Tenor is almost clunky, but in a good way. Makes me think of someone like Ron Bridgewater. Not Harold Mabern, but somebody very much out of that school. I think it's maybe a little later than the Bridgewater Brothers, but I like this. Trumpet seems like one of the Wynton contemporaries to me. Maybe Marlon Jordan or somebody like that, though I'm taking to him more than I typically do those guys. Jack Walrath? The only thing that isn't hitting for me is I want the drums to go ON to something (and I didn't care for the A train quote, but now I'm just nitpicking).

Interesting comments, in the ballpark, with no correct musicians IDs.

Track 6 - This just isn't firing for me. Too flowery and I'm just not buying it.

Track 7 - Man, I've been missing these guys every time, but I like this style. I'll guess Alan Eager because it seems no matter who I guess when I hear this type of tone/style, I'm wrong and it ends up being him. Pianist owes Basie some royalties. Now the tenor sounds like Lester Young in the deliberate approach to the rhythm, but the band just doesn't seem to swing enough for that to be the case.

It is not Alan Eager. Spot on analysis of whether it is Lester Young.

Track 8 - That trumpet (seems like there may have been two) sure sounds like Roy Eldredge to me, but again, the band doesn't seem to swing enough for that to be the case.

It is Roy Eldridge. But who else is playing, and who is the leader?

Track 9 - I like this in spite of the technocrat tenor. He has a bigger, warmer sound than most who play like this. However, he definitely comes out of that Brecker generation. In the beginning I had hopes this was going to be an Ahmed Abdul-Malik cut. The tenor is staying close enough to the rhythm of the accompaniment (meaning he's not getting lost in the technique stuff, though he flirts with it), and that's why this works for me. It's interesting and I want to know more about it. Can't hear the bass too well on my laptop speakers, but what I CAN hear, I like.

Apt comments. I heard this playing in a small used bookstore and without knowing who it was, asked the owner if I could buy his copy which he had playing.

Track 10 - No idea. Doesn't seem like a player from the generation of this music, but a more modern player playing in the style. Not really hitting it for me.

Not a modern player.

Track 11 - Man, I swear I know this tune. I like the song, and I'm digging the piano. A little Dear Old Stockholm thrown in the middle there. I like the drums, too -- this is *alive*. I want this.

Jim Sangry identified this. It is Dear Old Stockholm, by Richard Davis. The entire album is quite good. It was intially released as "Philosophy of the Spiritual" on Cobblestone, and was reissued on Muse as "With Understanding."

Track 12 - Sounds a lot like B.B. King's guitar, there. Sounds like Bob Berg on tenor to me. This isn't really pulling off what it's trying to be. Drums are stiff like the Cray Band. I'm almost positive it's Bob Berg. Guitar isn't over-amplified enough to be B.B. (and it doesn't seem to bite enough to be him). This one doesn't really strike it for me, either. If it IS B.B., it's him on an off day. The blues doesn't work unless somebody gives a shit, and I'm not hearing that anyone here does.

It is Bob Berg on tenor, good ears. B.B. King is the first of two guitar soloists--who is the second? It is not a date under B.B. King's name. It is one of his least likely sideman appearances.

Track 13 - No clue, outside my realm.

Track 14 - Well, I've got the song, anyway. Somebody has worked awfully hard to get Ellington's trinkle down. So much so that I'm wondering if this is some perverse remix. Okay, this is bizarre... what the hell was going in the beginning? Now that piano is decidedly not him. Almost sounds like Art Tatum or Oscar Peterson there at times. Some strange festival jam? Drums almost sound like Jimmy Cobb to me. The arrangement is Duke, but that's not his guys in there. Could be Norris Turney on lead making one of the later bands. Now I'm getting a Phineas vibe, which has me leaning towards Tatum, again. Intrigued.

Jim Sangry identified this. It is Duke Ellington and his band. Duke plays piano at the beginning, then Oscar Peterson takes over the piano and plays the solo parts.

I once had a mediocre set of Acoustic Research speakers which I won in a radio contest. They were not that good, but Tony Williams' drum playing with Miles Davis sounded incredible on them. It was as if they were manufactured around Tony Williams' work with Miles Davis. Well, the same kind of thing happened to me with this Duke/Oscar Peterson cut. I first heard it at a friend's house in Los Angeles in 1978. A Los Angeles jazz radio station played this song. On my friend's particular mediocre speakers, Oscar Peterson's piano part seemed to explode out of the speakers, so exciting. Halfway through I knew I had to get this album. However, it has never sounded nearly as compelling on any other stereo. But I have always had a soft spot in my heart for this recording.

I wonder if this is the first time that Duke Ellington and his band playing "Take the A Train" has appeared on a Blindfold Test?

Track 15 - This is NOT speaking to me (well, unless you count telling me to kill the neighbor's dog). At 1:30, I'm yelling at it to go somewhere. Herky jerky, but I don't get the point. Had to fast forward into the solos, and I'm sorry I did. Hits me like Rudresh on alto, and this is doing less than nothing for me. I love this done right. This ain't it.

I don't disagree. NIS identified it as Mary Halvorson, who is getting attention these days as a younger avant garde guitarist. I was interested in everyone's reaction to this one.

Track 16 - I respect the technique, I'm just not interested.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Dot gonna foul up and miss this one like I d the last one, so...discalimars and thanks of traditional bearing both firmly in place, let's go!

TRACK ONE - Sounds like an early-mid-50s Prestige date, but no idea who...trumpeter gets one overt Dizzy-ism in that makes me think Conte Candoli, which might put us out west? I enjoyed it well enough.

You will be surprised at who this is!

TRACK TWO - Can't recall the name of this tune off the top of my head, but I'm familiar with it through a Bill Doggett version. That one hits the spot, and so does this one.

The Magnificent Goldberg has identified the artist, song and tenor sax soloist.

TRACK THREE - Kenton, "Dynaflow", Art Pepper & Bob Cooper, iirc. 1951(?) Made around the same time that the Innovations In Modern Music thing was going on, so this was considered a "commercial" release, and as I understand it, accomplished its goal. What can you say - all the formulas are in place & they're all executed well. It's a slight piece of writing, really, but it's played loudly with modern solos, so it worked as Kentonjazz. But really, it could have been by Kenton's Artistry In Rhythm band from the previous decade. Definitely a "regressive" thing for Kenton at the time, but it sold records and kept interest in the band for dance gigs when the Innovations thing was off, so, hey. Band's gotta do what a band's gotta do, right?

You are correct in your identifications. I like Art Pepper's solo here, as an indication of how much potential he had at the beginning of his career.

TRACK FOUR - That head is familiar, but just in spots...No idea who it might be...sounds like mid-80s, maybe? If it was a neighbor, I'd not call the police, but I don't know that I'd go over for a beer either...basically it's like yeah, I hear what you're doing and can tell that you really mean it, so keep on doing that, just don't look for me to be a regular at your gigs or anything, and all the best, for real.

TRACK FIVE - It's as if Sister Cheryl was eating a hambone! Wallace Roney? Good ideas, the trumpeter has..but I don't think that's Antoine on tenor..might be, accidentally...tenor solo's kind of a mess, really, effects and style and hiplicks, it doesn't really work, but it's so clueless about not working that I kinda dig it, like somebody trying to impress and failing so badly that they impress anyway, like "wow, that took courage. I dig courage as a free-standing quality". I do think the rhythm section is trying just a little too hard, though. Let it breathe and it will swing better, and/or as much as it can, all things considered. Not bad at all, just a little...obvious. And an "A Train" near-quote almost at the very end! Not sure about the guitar, though, ever. Don't know why it's there.

Interesting comments. It is not Wallace Roney.

TRACK SIX - Wynton-ish trumpet playing, "modern" string writing, has the feel of a soundtrack thing...Terrence Blanchard? Trumpet playing is very clean, especially in the lower register. Some Miles-y, Clark Terry-ish thins here and there, it's good playing. And I do like the string writing. Overall effect is still slight for me though, because it sounds like "event music" rather than "life music". But as with the other thing earlier, it's working in areas that are not necessarily totally played out as far as getting through to more people, which is important, to just have sounds like this not sound WEIRD to a more general audience, so if this IS soundtrack music, I can't say but that I might not enjoy seeing the movie.

It is not Blanchard on trumpet. I think you will be surprised at where this comes from.

TRACK SEVEN - Lady Q? Funny how you can try to sound exactly like something, and the closer you get, the farther away you end up. I like it, but it is kinda creepy at the same time. If that's really Quinichette, I like him when he got more quirky and less literal. Then he was where he probably wanted to get to all along - had his own legit place in somebody else's very personal world.

Not Paul Quinichette.

TRACK EIGHT - The changes are kinda gimmicky, but that IS Roy Eldridge, so hey. Game Over, Eldridge Wins. Eldridge remains undefeated. That's not Budd Johnson, is it? Or is it?

It's Roy, but not Budd.

TRACK NINE - I played in a band that did this Arab-Jazz thing put together by a couple of Lebanese brothers, a lot of traditional folk songs opened up for improvisation over the basic traditional grooves, and yes, there was plenty room to be had., When the club would go for it, we'd bring in belly dancers, real ones, not strippers in disguise. On rare occasions, Artis The Spoonman would sit in if he was in town and jam the shit out of these grooves. I like this kind of music, and I like what is being played here. Will there be dancers next week? Yes? Let me booka table now, please.

As I said in response to Thom Keith, I heard this playing in a small, independently owned used bookstore, and on the spot asked the owner if I could buy his CD.

TRACK TEN - Piano roll of somebody famous?

Ah HA! Someone could hear that it is a piano roll. I am not sure how famous the player is.

TRACK ELEVEN - Richard Davis. "Dear Old Stockholm", with Chick Corea (and Bill Lee!), from The Philosophy Of The Spiritual on Cobblestone, a record well worth looking for, as are most records under Richard Davis' name.

Yes, you got it! The album was reissued on Muse as "With Understanding". I think it is one of Richard Davis' better solo albums.

Richard spoke fondly of Bill Lee when I took his jazz history class at the University of Wisconsin, and led an excellent 1978 trio club date with Bill's daughter Consuela on piano (at Bunky's in Madison). However, I never heard from Richard about what he thought of Bill's son Spike.

TRACK TWELVE - Steps Ahead? With the vibes, I don't know who else to guess, other than Robben Ford or somebody like that...not really calling my name right now. This is kind of for its scene what "Dynaflow" would've been for Kenton's - a chance to play something tight and professional that damn near everybody will like, and when you make that money, you can go off onto something else for a while, at least until the money runs out. Not bad, just a little...complacent. But expertly so!

I think you are exactly right, regarding the album's leader. This is one of his most commercialized outings.

But who are the two guitarists? Thom Keith correctly identified B.B. King as the first soloist, but who is the second? It is one of B.B. King's most unusual sideman appearances.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Basie! "K.C. Stride", the airshot from 44 with Prez stretching out for three of his most luxurious choruses on record is desert island music for me. This is not that, but same band, same tune, just a lot more constricted and, Jacquet in the little tenor interlude? When I sometimes mention how you can hear the Old Testament band becoming the New Testament band before they actually WERE the New Testament band, this is a good, not great, example.

You got it!

TRACK FOURTEEN - Ellington w/Oscar Peterson sitting in (but not before Duke sets the pace). Gotsta be that. God do I love Duke! Did this occur in Canada?

You have identified it correctly. It took place in a much warmer clime, than Canada.

TRACK FIFTEEN - Not sure...not sure....liking the bottom of the music, perhaps not the top, but still not sure...no, still not sure...not sure if that way of intersecting that rhythm speaks to me in a positive manner...not sure...ok, now it stirs up good, but just for some, not all...still not sure...now we gettin' all electrocharged and stuff...no, not sure...a nice sober ending and still...not...sure.

I agree. As I stated in response to Thom Keith, NIS idenitified this as guitarist Mary Halvorson, who gets some good jazz press.....but I am not sure, either.

TRACK SIXTEEN - Stanley Jordan? Whatever happened to Stanley Jordan? I thought he had a bit of a vision and got it swallwoed up quite quickly by making records that were marketed to sell one thing when where he was wanting to go was someplace else altogether, some place more like this. Assuming that this is in fact Stanley Jordan, and I hear enough imprecision (of the ok variety) to make me think it is. It would be easy to brush it off as solo guitar flash or some such, but there's some meat in that hot dog as well, so eat with deliberation.

It is not Stanley Jordan. I think that you will be shocked by the cover art for the album from which this comes.

That was an interesting grouping, heard a few familiarities and many more curiosity piquers. Thanks, much enjoyed it!

You are most welcome, and thanks for your insightful comments! Just wait until you find out who is playing on #1!

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Is #16 Ralph Towner by any chance?

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Oh boy THIS was SO much fun!!!! Of course, I don't know anything, which makes it that much more fun for all ages!

Track 1: Recent vintage of an old tune. I hate when I hear a melody I should be able to identify but can’t. I love this track though! Excitement abounds!

Track 2: Wow! I like this line-up: sounds like two trombones, a tenor, and a rhythm section with guitar instead of piano! Sign me up NOW!!! Gonna guess Arnett Cobb on the tenor just cuz that’s the first thing that came to mind, not because I know any better! Oh, I guess there is a piano after all. Have I mentioned how clueless I am when it comes to these things? Hmmm.... Spare piano.... Basie or a reasonable facsimile?

Track 3: LOOOOOOOOVE this sound! Oh, what is that riff the trombones are playing? My my my, that bridge is delicious!!! Simply MUST seek this out!!!!

Track 4: Ptah, I gotta give you credit for holding out this long before unloading the skronk!!! I still can’t listen to it, though. :g

Track 5: A groove like this for ten minutes? Bring it, baby!!! Oh boy, it did! It stayed on that groove, the solos were warm & tasty like comfort food, no sudden tempo changes, no squawking anythings, etc. Ohhhhhhhh yeah, gonna be listening to this again A BUNCH!!! Wait... where did that reverbbed guitar come from??? That just makes me wanna jump up and yell OH YEAHHH!!!!

Track 6: sounds like a Freddie Hubbard CTI. If it is, then my CTI knowledge just took a massive hit to the ego, because I thought I knew ‘em all. Oh geez, that piano riff sounds SO familiar. It’s gotta be from SKY DIVE or POLAR AC. One of the two, and I clearly haven’t listened to either one as closely as I thought. {{{groan}}}

Track 7: Ha! You think you’re so smart, thinking you’ll put this on here and everyone’s gonna think it’s Pres, but I know it’s not! I know it’s the Vice Pres! And that’s Freddie Greene! And this is from that Verve Elite that combined the 12” and the 10” that drew from a slew of sessions into a nice compact package! And that’s Jimmy Jones on the piano! And I’m too lazy to look up track names or album names. Which means if I’m wrong about any of this, then I’m gonna feel awful silly about the above display of braggadocio!

Track 8: Sounds like it could ALSO be from the aforementioned Vice Pres disc, but it actually reminds of me of something from the Illinois Jacquet Verve Elite. If I’m wrong, then it’s all good cuz I need to give that a spin, and then find out who THIS is and see if it’s available anywhere! I love this sound: small group sounding a lot bigger than it really is! Gimme this ANY day of the week!!!!

NOTE TO SELF: seems to me that Mercury put out a lotta great small-group records like this back in the late-40’s/early-50’s: the aforementioned Quinichette record & Jacquet record, then there were the Terry Gibbs Big Band records they put out. I need to investigate this further!!!

Track 9: is that a banjo being played like a sitar? Whatta groove! Okay, now it’s starting to get a little weird. Maybe some Yusef Lateef? Ahhhhh, what is that, an autoharp? Or Ahmed Abdul-Malik?

Track 10: Nice, but I wish I had the faculties to be able to tell one solo piano from another. I know it’s not Fats Waller, Jelly Roll Morton, Fatha Hines, Teddy Wilson, or Art Tatum. Do I get points for knowing who it ain’t?

Track 11: Ahhhh, nice intro, don’t let me down! Oh, this is pretty. Very lovely cello playing so far. Loving the guitar accompaniment! Wishing it wasn’t so loud here at the office so I could hear this better, must listen later with headphones or something. Is it a Jacques Louissier (sp?) thing? Oh boy, now that the full band is in full swing, this just took on a whole ‘nother level of fun!

Track 12: Wow! Sounds like mid-90’s vintage. It’s clichéd, but in all the right places so as to be completely fun & free-wheeling! Sounds like everyone’s having a good time just playing the blues! Can’t argue with that!

Track 13: This must be a first: a track from a previous BFT reappearing on a subsequent BFT. This first appeared on JSngry’s BFT #4 from AGES ago, Count Basie’s “K.C. Stride!” Funny thing is, I actually contemplated making my next BFT nothing but tracks from previous BFT’s just to see if anyone was paying attention. Does anyone else give those old BFT’s a regular spin? I know I do! There’s a vast treasure trove of great music on those collections!

Track 14: Where oh where is the Duke playing this? Duke live is ALWAYS a good thing! I love this arrangement, the version with which I’m familiar can also be found on the PIANO IN THE BACKGROUND album!

Track 15: Started out good enough, but.... I dunno, did a cross-breeze knock everyone’s music off their stands and they just decided to wing it from there on out?

Track 16: Solo guitar. MUCH love! Pat Metheny?

Geez, Ptah, maybe I’ve been wrong about you this whole time! Now I feel so bad for all the grief I ever gave you about noisy music, I’m thinking I may need to change the course of action for MY BFT coming up in January.

Or not. :g

THIS, my man, will be getting regular multiple listens! One for the ages & all that! :party:

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TRACK SEVEN - Lady Q? Funny how you can try to sound exactly like something, and the closer you get, the farther away you end up. I like it, but it is kinda creepy at the same time. If that's really Quinichette, I like him when he got more quirky and less literal. Then he was where he probably wanted to get to all along - had his own legit place in somebody else's very personal world.

Not Paul Quinichette.

Drat!

TRACK THIRTEEN - Basie! "K.C. Stride", the airshot from 44 with Prez stretching out for three of his most luxurious choruses on record is desert island music for me. This is not that, but same band, same tune, just a lot more constricted and, Jacquet in the little tenor interlude? When I sometimes mention how you can hear the Old Testament band becoming the New Testament band before they actually WERE the New Testament band, this is a good, not great, example.

You got it!

Wait, so this isn't the exact same track what was on JSngry's BFT? Of course I'll defer if I'm wrong, but there were so many times I had to keep checking my player because I thought I'd somehow switched BFT's!

Edited by Big Al

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Same tune/arrangement, different perfomance.

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Oh boy THIS was SO much fun!!!! Of course, I don't know anything, which makes it that much more fun for all ages!

Track 1: Recent vintage of an old tune. I hate when I hear a melody I should be able to identify but can’t. I love this track though! Excitement abounds!

Just wait until you see who this is!

Track 2: Wow! I like this line-up: sounds like two trombones, a tenor, and a rhythm section with guitar instead of piano! Sign me up NOW!!! Gonna guess Arnett Cobb on the tenor just cuz that’s the first thing that came to mind, not because I know any better! Oh, I guess there is a piano after all. Have I mentioned how clueless I am when it comes to these things? Hmmm.... Spare piano.... Basie or a reasonable facsimile?

The Magnificent Goldberg has identified this one. Not Cobb or Basie. It has a Basie feel though.

Track 3: LOOOOOOOOVE this sound! Oh, what is that riff the trombones are playing? My my my, that bridge is delicious!!! Simply MUST seek this out!!!!

Track 4: Ptah, I gotta give you credit for holding out this long before unloading the skronk!!! I still can’t listen to it, though. :g

Track 5: A groove like this for ten minutes? Bring it, baby!!! Oh boy, it did! It stayed on that groove, the solos were warm & tasty like comfort food, no sudden tempo changes, no squawking anythings, etc. Ohhhhhhhh yeah, gonna be listening to this again A BUNCH!!! Wait... where did that reverbbed guitar come from??? That just makes me wanna jump up and yell OH YEAHHH!!!!

Glad you like it!

Track 6: sounds like a Freddie Hubbard CTI. If it is, then my CTI knowledge just took a massive hit to the ego, because I thought I knew ‘em all. Oh geez, that piano riff sounds SO familiar. It’s gotta be from SKY DIVE or POLAR AC. One of the two, and I clearly haven’t listened to either one as closely as I thought. {{{groan}}}

Not Freddie Hubbard, so don't beat yourself up about listening to his CTIs! I think you will be surprised at the source of this one.

Track 7: Ha! You think you’re so smart, thinking you’ll put this on here and everyone’s gonna think it’s Pres, but I know it’s not! I know it’s the Vice Pres! And that’s Freddie Greene! And this is from that Verve Elite that combined the 12” and the 10” that drew from a slew of sessions into a nice compact package! And that’s Jimmy Jones on the piano! And I’m too lazy to look up track names or album names. Which means if I’m wrong about any of this, then I’m gonna feel awful silly about the above display of braggadocio!

Not Paul Q or Jimmy Jones. Also not Lester Young.

Track 8: Sounds like it could ALSO be from the aforementioned Vice Pres disc, but it actually reminds of me of something from the Illinois Jacquet Verve Elite. If I’m wrong, then it’s all good cuz I need to give that a spin, and then find out who THIS is and see if it’s available anywhere! I love this sound: small group sounding a lot bigger than it really is! Gimme this ANY day of the week!!!!

Not Illinois Jacquet.

NOTE TO SELF: seems to me that Mercury put out a lotta great small-group records like this back in the late-40’s/early-50’s: the aforementioned Quinichette record & Jacquet record, then there were the Terry Gibbs Big Band records they put out. I need to investigate this further!!!

Track 9: is that a banjo being played like a sitar? Whatta groove! Okay, now it’s starting to get a little weird. Maybe some Yusef Lateef? Ahhhhh, what is that, an autoharp? Or Ahmed Abdul-Malik?

Your IDs are not correct. I agree, whatta groove!

Track 10: Nice, but I wish I had the faculties to be able to tell one solo piano from another. I know it’s not Fats Waller, Jelly Roll Morton, Fatha Hines, Teddy Wilson, or Art Tatum. Do I get points for knowing who it ain’t?

Take all the points you want. It is none of those.

Track 11: Ahhhh, nice intro, don’t let me down! Oh, this is pretty. Very lovely cello playing so far. Loving the guitar accompaniment! Wishing it wasn’t so loud here at the office so I could hear this better, must listen later with headphones or something. Is it a Jacques Louissier (sp?) thing? Oh boy, now that the full band is in full swing, this just took on a whole ‘nother level of fun!

JSngry identified this one. I always thought it was fun.

Track 12: Wow! Sounds like mid-90’s vintage. It’s clichéd, but in all the right places so as to be completely fun & free-wheeling! Sounds like everyone’s having a good time just playing the blues! Can’t argue with that!

Track 13: This must be a first: a track from a previous BFT reappearing on a subsequent BFT. This first appeared on JSngry’s BFT #4 from AGES ago, Count Basie’s “K.C. Stride!” Funny thing is, I actually contemplated making my next BFT nothing but tracks from previous BFT’s just to see if anyone was paying attention. Does anyone else give those old BFT’s a regular spin? I know I do! There’s a vast treasure trove of great music on those collections!

Track 14: Where oh where is the Duke playing this? Duke live is ALWAYS a good thing! I love this arrangement, the version with which I’m familiar can also be found on the PIANO IN THE BACKGROUND album!

JSngry also identified this, as Duke and his band with guest soloist Oscar Peterson.

Track 15: Started out good enough, but.... I dunno, did a cross-breeze knock everyone’s music off their stands and they just decided to wing it from there on out?

I actually do not like this track that much, but the leader gets some good jazz press. I wanted to see what others would think of it.

Track 16: Solo guitar. MUCH love! Pat Metheny?

Not Pat Metheny.

Geez, Ptah, maybe I’ve been wrong about you this whole time! Now I feel so bad for all the grief I ever gave you about noisy music, I’m thinking I may need to change the course of action for MY BFT coming up in January.

I am glad that you liked this, Big Al.

Or not. :g

THIS, my man, will be getting regular multiple listens! One for the ages & all that! :party:

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A few things are bugging me that I can't identify, such as...

Track One - sounds like a recording at Rudy's parents house, tenor is like a smoothed out early-50s Rollins, Jimmy Heath? I was thinking maybe an early Clifford Brown on trumpet, but no, right?

Track Six - Is this Wynton? And/or from a soundtack? The more I listen, the more both seem likely?

Track Seven - Not Brew Moore? Is the tenor player American?

Track Twelve - Oh my! http://www.allmusic.com/album/six-pack-mw0000088778

Track Sixteen Lenny Breau died before recordings sounded like this. I really like this, it is just one guitarist, right? Or not> I hear the occasional picking thing that kind of hints at some country roots, but it's the really percussive attack and slightly "off" pitch on some notes that had me thinking maybe a later, less "star in the making" Stanley Jordan. I've not a clue, unfortunately, but I really do like it. And the tune is familiar, it seems...GRRRRR!!!!!! :g

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A few things are bugging me that I can't identify, such as...

Track One - sounds like a recording at Rudy's parents house, tenor is like a smoothed out early-50s Rollins, Jimmy Heath? I was thinking maybe an early Clifford Brown on trumpet, but no, right?

No, those guesses are not correct..

Track Six - Is this Wynton? And/or from a soundtack? The more I listen, the more both seem likely?

No and no. It is not from a soundtrack, although it sounds like one to me too.

Track Seven - Not Brew Moore? Is the tenor player American?

No, not Brew Moore. Yes, he is American.

Track Twelve - Oh my! http://www.allmusic....00088778.

Yes, you found it.. I actually heard this one on a B.B. King collection, as I have never heard this Burton CD.

Track Sixteen Lenny Breau died before recordings sounded like this. I really like this, it is just one guitarist, right? Or not> I hear the occasional picking thing that kind of hints at some country roots, but it's the really percussive attack and slightly "off" pitch on some notes that had me thinking maybe a later, less "star in the making" Stanley Jordan. I've not a clue, unfortunately, but I really do like it. And the tune is familiar, it seems...GRRRRR!!!!!! :g.

No, you have not guessed correctly yet If there is anyone who might know this one, it is you!

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Before the whole darn month gets away from me, here's a stab at the first part....

1. Circa 1955-6. Maybe 8 to 10 pieces? Maybe the drummer is the leader? Maybe one of those Osie Johnson dates? Tenor sounds like a cross between Frank Foster and Sonny Rollins. Firey trumpet, good trombone. I like the crude vigor of the piano solo.

2. About the same vintage. A jazz tenorist leaning toward R&B, or an R&B tenorist leaning toward jazz, and doing a very nice job either way.

3. Kentonish brass. The more I listen, Kentonish everything. Alto soloist might be Pepper. The interruption of the alto solo is just too much brass. The Ellingtonian piano fills in the last 8 bars are delightful, though. There, I said something nice about Kenton.

4. Took me a while to remember what the intro was reminding me of -- the awful music from the awful movie "Manos, The Hands of Fate." Which reminds me, it's been too long since I watched Mystery Science Theater 3000. I'm going to guess that this is Jazz Passengers-related. It's full of nice ideas, especially the 6/4 groove, but they don't do a whole lot with it.

5. The Bo Diddley beat -- needs maracas -- with a nice tune over it. The guitar behaves like rock 'n' roll, while the rest of the band behaves like a jazz band. The trumpet solo is what I like. The other solos aren't bad. Really, this is lovely.

6. Real strings badly recorded and produced, or synthesized strings? Might be Wynton, sounds a little more like Terence. Maybe a Don Sebesky chart?

7. Best Lester Young imitation I've ever heard. Had me fooled (I was thinking it was a take from the "Crazy Over J-Z" Savoy date) until after the trumpet solo. Then the repeater pencil blows his cover by coming back with a too-explicit quote of Lester's "Easy Does It" break. Presumably Paul Quinichette.

8. Basie-ish but not Basie, maybe Nat Pierce on piano. One of those circa-1957 things, like the Cohn-Newman-Green Mosaic is full of. The tenor's opening quote of "Baby It's Cold Outside" is funny. Is that Roy or Sweets?

9. I'm in the mood for oud... Presumably Rabih-Abou Khalil (if not KC's Alaturka).

10. No idea. Too many notes to be McShann. The player has a really nice textural sense.

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Before the whole darn month gets away from me, here's a stab at the first part....

1. Circa 1955-6. Maybe 8 to 10 pieces? Maybe the drummer is the leader? Maybe one of those Osie Johnson dates? Tenor sounds like a cross between Frank Foster and Sonny Rollins. Firey trumpet, good trombone. I like the crude vigor of the piano solo. No one has come close to identifying this one.

2. About the same vintage. A jazz tenorist leaning toward R&B, or an R&B tenorist leaning toward jazz, and doing a very nice job either way.

Insightful comment. The Magnificent Goldberg identified this one.

3. Kentonish brass. The more I listen, Kentonish everything. Alto soloist might be Pepper. The interruption of the alto solo is just too much brass. The Ellingtonian piano fills in the last 8 bars are delightful, though. There, I said something nice about Kenton.

It is in fact Kenton with Art Pepper.

4. Took me a while to remember what the intro was reminding me of -- the awful music from the awful movie "Manos, The Hands of Fate." Which reminds me, it's been too long since I watched Mystery Science Theater 3000. I'm going to guess that this is Jazz Passengers-related. It's full of nice ideas, especially the 6/4 groove, but they don't do a whole lot with it.

Interesting comments. You're warm with that guess.

5. The Bo Diddley beat -- needs maracas -- with a nice tune over it. The guitar behaves like rock 'n' roll, while the rest of the band behaves like a jazz band. The trumpet solo is what I like. The other solos aren't bad. Really, this is lovely.

6. Real strings badly recorded and produced, or synthesized strings? Might be Wynton, sounds a little more like Terence. Maybe a Don Sebesky chart?

They are real strings. Rest of guesses not very close. I think everyone will be surprised at who this is.

7. Best Lester Young imitation I've ever heard. Had me fooled (I was thinking it was a take from the "Crazy Over J-Z" Savoy date) until after the trumpet solo. Then the repeater pencil blows his cover by coming back with a too-explicit quote of Lester's "Easy Does It" break. Presumably Paul Quinichette.

Not Paul Q. Not Lester Young.

8. Basie-ish but not Basie, maybe Nat Pierce on piano. One of those circa-1957 things, like the Cohn-Newman-Green Mosaic is full of. The tenor's opening quote of "Baby It's Cold Outside" is funny. Is that Roy or Sweets?

It Is Roy. Who is the saxophone soloist?

9. I'm in the mood for oud... Presumably Rabih-Abou Khalil (if not KC's Alarurka). One of those guesses is correct! Pick one and go with it!

10. No idea. Too many notes to be McShann. The player has a really nice textural sense. It is not McShann.

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Before the whole darn month gets away from me, here's a stab at the first part....

1. Circa 1955-6. Maybe 8 to 10 pieces? Maybe the drummer is the leader? Maybe one of those Osie Johnson dates? Tenor sounds like a cross between Frank Foster and Sonny Rollins. Firey trumpet, good trombone. I like the crude vigor of the piano solo. No one has come close to identifying this one.

2. About the same vintage. A jazz tenorist leaning toward R&B, or an R&B tenorist leaning toward jazz, and doing a very nice job either way.

Insightful comment. The Magnificent Goldberg identified this one.

3. Kentonish brass. The more I listen, Kentonish everything. Alto soloist might be Pepper. The interruption of the alto solo is just too much brass. The Ellingtonian piano fills in the last 8 bars are delightful, though. There, I said something nice about Kenton.

It is in fact Kenton with Art Pepper.

4. Took me a while to remember what the intro was reminding me of -- the awful music from the awful movie "Manos, The Hands of Fate." Which reminds me, it's been too long since I watched Mystery Science Theater 3000. I'm going to guess that this is Jazz Passengers-related. It's full of nice ideas, especially the 6/4 groove, but they don't do a whole lot with it.

Interesting comments. You're warm with that guess, in terms of time frame and community.

5. The Bo Diddley beat -- needs maracas -- with a nice tune over it. The guitar behaves like rock 'n' roll, while the rest of the band behaves like a jazz band. The trumpet solo is what I like. The other solos aren't bad. Really, this is lovely.i

6. Real strings badly recorded and produced, or synthesized strings? Might be Wynton, sounds a little more like Terence. Maybe a Don Sebesky chart?

They are real strings. Rest of guesses not very close. I think everyone will be surprised at who this is.

7. Best Lester Young imitation I've ever heard. Had me fooled (I was thinking it was a take from the "Crazy Over J-Z" Savoy date) until after the trumpet solo. Then the repeater pencil blows his cover by coming back with a too-explicit quote of Lester's "Easy Does It" break. Presumably Paul Quinichette.

Not Paul Q. Not Lester Young.

8. Basie-ish but not Basie, maybe Nat Pierce on piano. One of those circa-1957 things, like the Cohn-Newman-Green Mosaic is full of. The tenor's opening quote of "Baby It's Cold Outside" is funny. Is that Roy or Sweets?

It Is Roy. Who is the saxophone soloist?

9. I'm in the mood for oud... Presumably Rabih-Abou Khalil (if not KC's Alaturka). One of those guesses is correct! Pick one and go with it!

10. No idea. Too many notes to be McShann. The player has a really nice textural sense. It is not McShann.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Well, I waited until the last minute again. I haven't looked at the thread, but I'm guessing almost everything has been identified. I didn't recognize much, but I enjoyed most of it.

1. I recognized Sun Ra’s early style (and John Gilmore’s great tenor) right away, but I couldn’t remember the name of this tune until I dug around my CDs a little. It’s “Urnack,” from Angels and Demons at Play. Besides Gilmore, we get some nice early Julian Priester and Art Hoyle. My CD says that Charles Davis is the bari soloist, but I think it’s Pat Patrick. Great track.

2. Nice groove and tenor playing. They got to the first bridge awfully soon, didn’t they? I’ve got a couple of guesses, but I don’t want to embarrass myself, and it has probably already been identified by now.

3. I’m not crazy about the tune or arrangement – it’s awfully show-biz-y, and not in a good way like the Sun Ra track. But I sure the like the alto player, whoever he is – really interesting playing.

4. Cool – skronky and cooking. With this kind of groove you lose the interaction between soloist and rhythm section, but there are compensations in excitement. This reminds me of our own Johnny E’s Reptet, but the instrumentation isn’t quite right, I don’t think.

5. Thought for a minute that this was going to be Bo Diddley doing “Dolphin Dance.” I like the idea, and the soloists are good (particularly the tenor player), but the groove got kind of old to me after a while. I listened to this track twice, and both times wanted it to be over before it was.

6. Very nice for what it is. I like that the strings are spare, rather than lush. I also wanted it to go somewhere more than it did.

7. Well, I think that we’re supposed to think this is Prez with a small Basie group, but it ain’t. Is it Paul Qunichette? The pianist’s touch doesn’t sound like Basie, either – Nat Pierce? I really like the muted trumpet solo. And lord, I hope I haven’t embarrassed myself with this one.

8. More nice Basie-ish swing. The trumpet soloist sure sounds like Roy Eldridge, but I don’t know who he’s trading licks with. This is a fun, exciting track.

9. Okay, this is cool. I’ve gotten more into music of the eastern Mediterranean the past few years, but I’m far from an expert, so I don’t know from what part of the Middle East or thereabouts the non-jazz elements of this piece come from. But I like it a lot – when it settles into the vamp and the tenor player starts blowing over it, it’s a beautiful thing. Thanks for this one.

10. This sounds like a piano roll, and it sounds like James P. Johnson to me, especially when it started getting more sophisticated in the second chorus. In any case, I don’t think it’s a “down home” blues player – it’s someone with lots of harmonic knowledge. Good stuff.

11. An interesting version of the Swedish folk song that we non-Swedes call “Dear Old Stockholm” because Stan Getz called it that. Nice piano. I wanted to hear the cello player improvise. Pretty cool rendition.

12. Sounds like B.B. with a bunch of jazz guys. Is that Scofield who follows him? Everybody plays with a lot of style – this is fun.

13. Now this sounds like a Basie aircheck from the mid 1940s. It’s a Dickie Wells tune called “Kansas City Stride” which Basie recorded for V-Disc. Comparing this track to the V-Disc recording makes me think that it’s the same clarinet soloist, Rudy Rutherford. Is that Buddy Tate on tenor? Not sure about the alto or trumpet. Anyway, this is an exciting track, crappy sound quality notwithstanding.

14. I wondered for a minute why you would include this one – “A Train” with Ellington’s standard piano introduction – then all was made clear. Well, not all. I don’t know who the piano guest is. It’s someone with a lot of chops – more chops than originality, maybe.

15. Quirky and interesting, even if it’s not spectacular. It sounds like the guitar player is the bandleader, although I like the alto soloist more. The guitar player’s wildness does appeal to me, though. These musicians have their own sound and style, and that’s a good thing in my book.

16. This is some very accomplished guitar playing that leaves me cold.

Thanks for a good one, Hot Ptah!

Edited by jeffcrom

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Should have gotten Mary Halvorson. And I thought that was Gary Burton, but doubted myself enough that I didn't say it.

Edited by jeffcrom

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Ra for the first track? AAAARRRRGGGHHHH!!!!

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