Chuck Nessa

Dave Brubeck - RIP

123 posts in this topic

He was the kind of you you just figured was going to live forever...seemed to be blessed like that.

I've been up and down and back and forth with his musics, but what always comes through is that this was a good, decent man, not at all fooled or trapped by his success. If only for that,, Brubeck FTW.

RIP, and thanks.

Indeed. The fact that he was married for 70 years - and in the profession he was in - says an awful lot about the man.

Amen to all of the above.

God bless Dave Brubeck. Like Clifford said earlier, just because it's inevitable doesn't make it any easier when it happens.

RIP

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When I was coming up in the 1960's, it was hip to look down on Brubeck and his tremendous success, but eventually I came around. Had to. Over the years, I've talked to several musicians who worked with him, and to the one they went on about whan a decent human being he was.

RIP, Dave.

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He was my first exposure to jazz, thanks to my father who wore out his copy of Time Out. I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Brubeck at the Detroit Jazz Festival a few years back. A very gracious and gentle man. RIP.

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Terribly sad news. The Bru quartet was the first live first live jazz concert I attended(back in 1958) so a big influence on my early jazz listening. Drifted away later but in recent years I've come back to him in a big way. Thanks for all that fine music Dave.

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Happily, I was fortunate enough to have seen Dave Brubeck perform in concert a couple times. Needless to say, he will be missed.

Rest in Peace, Mr. Brubeck.

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I wish that I had seen him more than once in person, but I'm thankful for that lone opportunity. I don't have nearly enough of his music. RIP.

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When I was coming up in the 1960's, it was hip to look down on Brubeck and his tremendous success, but eventually I came around. Had to. Over the years, I've talked to several musicians who worked with him, and to the one they went on about whan a decent human being he was.

RIP, Dave.

Ditto for me, especially as I know you and I were born in the same year. Lately, I periodically listen to the ANGEL EYES lp that I've loaded into my iPod while at the gym. It really cooks!

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That version of Angel Eyes is my favorite-- a real gem.

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RIP This is one of those deaths that make you think "end of an era." Brubeck was at the ground floor of the creation of modern jazz after WWII. He carved out his own terrritory in it as well. I have always enjoyed his music, the way he fools around with harmony in particular.

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I know that the later recordings on Telarc are not in the same league as the classic quartet (what could be?), but I am fond of Night Shift and will dig it out to play tonight (naturally).

In the meantime, am listening to the Carnegie Hall Concert and probably Brubeck Plays Brubeck later today.

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Listening to Carnegie Hall now - still a fine set.

My favorite Brubeck, and an all-time favorite, period. I really like Thom Jurek's review over at AMG.

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RIP. "Live at Carnegie Hall" is wonderful

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The first jazz that I listened to knowing that it was jazz was the classic Brubeck Quartet. There were reasons for that, but this isn't the time or place to discuss them.

Thanks for your music and for helping to bring me where I am today, Mr. Brubeck.

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Probably more than any other single artist, he was a gateway jazz figure for me. Gotta admire a guy who made a good living playing jazz in oddball time signatures and who also lived in not one but two amazing moderne houses.

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I was afraid that this day would be sooner rather than later.

Like some others have said, I avoided Brubeck's music for years. But when the Time Signatures box set came out in 1992, I decided to get it so I would at least have some familiarity with the music. I thought at the time that it would be all the Brubeck I would ever need. Much to my surprise, I found most of it to be pretty good, and some of it really excellent. Needless to say, my collection of Brubeck recordings has grown a lot since I bought that one. Again much to my surprise, I have become a real fan in recent years.

And a video clip has stuck with me - it might have been from the dreaded Ken Burns documentary. Brubeck is talking about his experiences in World War II. When he speaks about the treatment African-American soldiers received from their country, his voice shakes and tears come to his eyes. The injustice is not abstract or removed - it's real and personal to him.

He wasn't always a great musician, but he was an important one, and from all reports a great human being. So long, Mr. Brubeck.

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And a video clip has stuck with me - it might have been from the dreaded Ken Burns documentary. Brubeck is talking about his experiences in World War II. When he speaks about the treatment African-American soldiers received from their country, his voice shakes and tears come to his eyes. The injustice is not abstract or removed - it's real and personal to him.

He wasn't always a great musician, but he was an important one, and from all reports a great human being. So long, Mr. Brubeck.

In the same vein, one news item that made the headlines in early 1959 was that Dave Brubeck deliberately passed up a one-week gig that would have netted him $17,000 (not a negligible figure even for a top earner at that time, I'd daresay) in that he steadfastly refused to make a trip to Johannesburg in South Africa that would have required him to dispense with the services of his (African-American) bassist Gene Wright. At the same time, he confirmed rumors that he definitely would cancel an appearance at the University of Georgia as he refused to appear there with an "all-white" quartet. The newspaper item in question quoted him as saying "Even if they had offered me a million dollars I would not have gotten rid of Gene Wright. You cannot buy self-respect".

Needless to hint at the fact other stellar jazz names during that period caved in in a fairly dismal way in this respect on certain occasions ...

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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Just listened to Jazz Goes To Junior College (twice) yesterday).

R.I.P.

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Amen brother... Well said.

Yes Jim. One of the humblest, most even personas in jazz. I for one love his music, so consistent is it. I look forward to listening for the rest of my days, so thanks Dave.

Although I never got to see the classic quartet.. I did see Brubeck probably 5-10 times and loved each one. Bobby Militello can play...RIP Dave.... you are already missed.

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R.I.P.

I listened to him very closely while checking his recordings with Cal Tjader for the latter's discography, and came to appreciate him more and more. I always liked his playing, appreciated his attempts at expanding jazz rhythmic phrasing beyond standard swing patterns (which someone like Joachim Berendt never quite understood) and wish he would have reocrded a trio album during the tenure of the quartet with Joe Morello. He was one of the real original piano stylists, IMHO.

My thoughts are with Iola and his children - and thanks for that wonderful music.

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a giant , glad I managed to see him once in person. RIP

me too. RIP

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