Hardbopjazz

BFT 107 discussion thread

73 posts in this topic

Is either #6 or 7 Tommy Whittle or Spike Robinson, by any chance? I can hear these two a bit better now. They both have a slightly tentative approach, with lots of influences from elsewhere, which they seem to be trying to controil, or disguise. So I thought they might be Brits :shrug[1]:

MG

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Is either #6 or 7 Tommy Whittle or Spike Robinson, by any chance? I can hear these two a bit better now. They both have a slightly tentative approach, with lots of influences from elsewhere, which they seem to be trying to controil, or disguise. So I thought they might be Brits :shrug[1]:

MG

Nope.

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Is that Ray Brown on #13?

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Is that Ray Brown on #13?

No. Hint, This one is fairly recent.

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Felser called himself Old Wooden Ears, which I take great offense to, because no one is worse at this game than me, and I resent anyone else trying to claim my crown as the most pathetic identifier of artists of all time.

So here are my impressions;

1. I have no idea who the guitarist is, but I like this version of "Darn That Dream". I find it compelling.

2. The first of two flute versions of "In a Sentimental Mood", back to back. I like that idea for a BFT. This flute player sounds like he or she has saxophone as their main instrument, and doubles on flute. The tone is so thin and breathy, as if the player does not really have control of the flute.

3. This flute player has a much more full and soulful tone, which is also rather beautiful. I do not know who this is. It does not sound like the flute players I am familiar with who are excellent enough to record this--Lew Tabackin, Hubert Laws, James Newton. So I am stumped. I wonder if the flute player also plays alto sax later in the song. If so, I can't recognize the alto sax player either. This is really wonderful music, to me.

4. Giant Steps with organ and guitar. They really burn through it. At first I wondered if this was from the John McLaughlin-Joey DeFrancesco collaborations, but the more I listen, it really does not sound like McLaughlin.

5. What an odd little thing, Kenny Rogers' "The Gambler". Who would sing this in the middle of a jazz concert? I have no idea, and want to find out.

6. This is a beautiful recording of "But Beautiful". The tenor sax and piano are both really good. I have no idea who it is.

7. Another version of the same song as on #6, ;'But Beautiful". The players are different from #6 and also really good. I have no idea who they are, either.

8. This sounds like the Woody Shaw group with guest artist Bobby Hutcherson. I like this recording a great deal. This is some really hot small group jazz!

9. Monk's Mood, by solo pianist I cannot identify. At times I thought it might be Abdullah Ibrahim, but at other times it really doesn't sound like him.

10. This one is very intriguing to me, Billy Strayhorn's "Isfahan". I can only think of Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus as leaders who would have those trombones in the background playing that type of muted, tough sounding part--which I have always found very appealing when they have used it. But you have already told me it is not Mingus.

If it is Duke, I don't recognize it. It does not have Johnny Hodges on it, and I am not aware of any recorded versions by Duke of "Isfahan" without Johnny Hodges. Also, it does not sound to me like Harold Minerve or Norris Turney, who might have played it with Duke after Hodges passed away. So who is it?

11. I have no idea who this is, but I like it very much. It is an interesting piece which makes me want to listen repeatedly.

12. I often like the sound of the accordian or other squeeze box instruments in jazz. I have no idea who this is, but find it compelling and appealing.

13. Easy Living, with a tenor saxophonist with a big, soulful sound. Who IS that? I do not recognize the vocalist, who has more soul to her sound than many jazz singers. I like this a lot and look forward to finding out who it is.

14. Excellent guitarists, and I like the inclusion of the pop tune.

This is one of my favorite Blindfold Tests in some time. Without going off into unfathomable weirdness, you have put together a set that is compelling from start to finish, and which I begin to play again in my car, as soon as I finish listening to the whole thing. Not that many albums qualify for repeated listening in my car!

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Felser called himself Old Wooden Ears, which I take great offense to, because no one is worse at this game than me, and I resent anyone else trying to claim my crown as the most pathetic identifier of artists of all time.

So here are my impressions;

1. I have no idea who the guitarist is, but I like this version of "Darn That Dream". I find it compelling.

Really well known. If no one gues it, when I give the answer, there will be a few "I could have had a V-8" reactions.

2. The first of two flute versions of "In a Sentimental Mood", back to back. I like that idea for a BFT. This flute player sounds like he or she has saxophone as their main instrument, and doubles on flute. The tone is so thin and breathy, as if the player does not really have control of the flute.

100% true. The flute is this person's second instrument. Here are two hints. 1. It is a male. 2. He joined a band for someone that died suddenly. These were some big shoes to fill, and he did a great job.

3. This flute player has a much more full and soulful tone, which is also rather beautiful. I do not know who this is. It does not sound like the flute players I am familiar with who are excellent enough to record this--Lew Tabackin, Hubert Laws, James Newton. So I am stumped. I wonder if the flute player also plays alto sax later in the song. If so, I can't recognize the alto sax player either. This is really wonderful music, to me.

It isn't any of the three you mentioned. This person too plays the sax first. Everyone knows who this is.

4. Giant Steps with organ and guitar. They really burn through it. At first I wondered if this was from the John McLaughlin-Joey DeFrancesco collaborations, but the more I listen, it really does not sound like McLaughlin.

You stumbled onto something here. I'll give you DeFrancesco, but it is not McLaughlin.

5. What an odd little thing, Kenny Rogers' "The Gambler". Who would sing this in the middle of a jazz concert? I have no idea, and want to find out.

This person is so cool. He oozes jazz. To see him sing "The Gambler" took everyone in the audience by surprise, even his band didn't expect it.

6. This is a beautiful recording of "But Beautiful". The tenor sax and piano are both really good. I have no idea who it is.

7. Another version of the same song as on #6, ;'But Beautiful". The players are different from #6 and also really good. I have no idea who they are, either.

8. This sounds like the Woody Shaw group with guest artist Bobby Hutcherson. I like this recording a great deal. This is some really hot small group jazz!

Not Woody Shaw. As already ID, it is Bobby Hutcherson on vibes.

9. Monk's Mood, by solo pianist I cannot identify. At times I thought it might be Abdullah Ibrahim, but at other times it really doesn't sound like him.

Abdullah Ibrahim it is not, but I can hear Abdullah doing this.

10. This one is very intriguing to me, Billy Strayhorn's "Isfahan". I can only think of Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus as leaders who would have those trombones in the background playing that type of muted, tough sounding part--which I have always found very appealing when they have used it. But you have already told me it is not Mingus.

IIf it is Duke, I don't recognize it. It does not have Johnny Hodges on it, and I am not aware of any recorded versions by Duke of "Isfahan" without Johnny Hodges. Also, it does not sound to me like Harold Minerve or Norris Turney, who might have played it with Duke after Hodges passed away. So who is it?

I really like this band. That's why I included this. This is recent. Think within the past 10 years.

11. I have no idea who this is, but I like it very much. It is an interesting piece which makes me want to listen repeatedly.

12. I often like the sound of the accordian or other squeeze box instruments in jazz. I have no idea who this is, but find it compelling and appealing.

13. Easy Living, with a tenor saxophonist with a big, soulful sound. Who IS that? I do not recognize the vocalist, who has more soul to her sound than many jazz singers. I like this a lot and look forward to finding out who it is.

Jim got the tenor player. It is Frank Wess. I'm surprised no one guessed who is on vocals. I thought this would be an easy one. Now I'm glad I included it.

14. Excellent guitarists, and I like the inclusion of the pop tune.

Yes, I like the pop tune, Wes feel. All three made a name for themselves.

This is one of my favorite Blindfold Tests in some time. Without going off into unfathomable weirdness, you have put together a set that is compelling from start to finish, and which I begin to play again in my car, as soon as I finish listening to the whole thing. Not that many albums qualify for repeated listening in my car!

Glad you liked it Bill.

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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TRACK ONE - "Darn that Dream". Impeccable technique, and/but a little stiff and/or "prepared" for my taste.

Yeah, that was my impression too (at least one of them). I'm actually surprised that this is a famous player. Gotta work on this. It almost sounds like a 7-string guitar when he hits the lower notes, but I don't want to jump to any conclusions. The tone (in that respect) might suggest someone like Bucky Pizzarelli (one of the first to use a 7-string), but the style and phrasing aren't saying Bucky to me. Hmm...

Why don't you say Bucky?

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Felser called himself Old Wooden Ears, which I take great offense to, because no one is worse at this game than me, and I resent anyone else trying to claim my crown as the most pathetic identifier of artists of all time.

So here are my impressions;

1. I have no idea who the guitarist is, but I like this version of "Darn That Dream". I find it compelling.

Really well known. If no one gues it, when I give the answer, there will be a few "I could have had a V-8" reactions.

2. The first of two flute versions of "In a Sentimental Mood", back to back. I like that idea for a BFT. This flute player sounds like he or she has saxophone as their main instrument, and doubles on flute. The tone is so thin and breathy, as if the player does not really have control of the flute.

100% true. The flute is this person's second instrument. Here are two hints. 1. It is a male. 2. He joined a band for someone that died suddenly. These were some big shoes to fill, and he did a great job.

3. This flute player has a much more full and soulful tone, which is also rather beautiful. I do not know who this is. It does not sound like the flute players I am familiar with who are excellent enough to record this--Lew Tabackin, Hubert Laws, James Newton. So I am stumped. I wonder if the flute player also plays alto sax later in the song. If so, I can't recognize the alto sax player either. This is really wonderful music, to me.

It isn't any of the three you mentioned. This person too plays the sax first. Everyone knows who this is.

4. Giant Steps with organ and guitar. They really burn through it. At first I wondered if this was from the John McLaughlin-Joey DeFrancesco collaborations, but the more I listen, it really does not sound like McLaughlin.

You stumbled onto something here. I'll give you DeFrancesco, but it is not McLaughlin.

5. What an odd little thing, Kenny Rogers' "The Gambler". Who would sing this in the middle of a jazz concert? I have no idea, and want to find out.

This person is so cool. He oozes jazz. To see him sing "The Gambler" took everyone in the audience by surprise, even his band didn't expect it.

6. This is a beautiful recording of "But Beautiful". The tenor sax and piano are both really good. I have no idea who it is.

7. Another version of the same song as on #6, ;'But Beautiful". The players are different from #6 and also really good. I have no idea who they are, either.

8. This sounds like the Woody Shaw group with guest artist Bobby Hutcherson. I like this recording a great deal. This is some really hot small group jazz!

Not Woody Shaw. As already ID, it is Bobby Hutcherson on vibes.

9. Monk's Mood, by solo pianist I cannot identify. At times I thought it might be Abdullah Ibrahim, but at other times it really doesn't sound like him.

Abdullah Ibrahim it is not, but I can hear Abdullah doing this.

10. This one is very intriguing to me, Billy Strayhorn's "Isfahan". I can only think of Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus as leaders who would have those trombones in the background playing that type of muted, tough sounding part--which I have always found very appealing when they have used it. But you have already told me it is not Mingus.

IIf it is Duke, I don't recognize it. It does not have Johnny Hodges on it, and I am not aware of any recorded versions by Duke of "Isfahan" without Johnny Hodges. Also, it does not sound to me like Harold Minerve or Norris Turney, who might have played it with Duke after Hodges passed away. So who is it?

I really like this band. That's why I included this. This is recent. Think within the past 10 years.

11. I have no idea who this is, but I like it very much. It is an interesting piece which makes me want to listen repeatedly.

12. I often like the sound of the accordian or other squeeze box instruments in jazz. I have no idea who this is, but find it compelling and appealing.

13. Easy Living, with a tenor saxophonist with a big, soulful sound. Who IS that? I do not recognize the vocalist, who has more soul to her sound than many jazz singers. I like this a lot and look forward to finding out who it is.

Jim got the tenor player. It is Frank Wess. I'm surprised no one guessed who is on vocals. I thought this would be an easy one. Now I'm glad I included it.

14. Excellent guitarists, and I like the inclusion of the pop tune.

Yes, I like the pop tune, Wes feel. All three made a name for themselves.

This is one of my favorite Blindfold Tests in some time. Without going off into unfathomable weirdness, you have put together a set that is compelling from start to finish, and which I begin to play again in my car, as soon as I finish listening to the whole thing. Not that many albums qualify for repeated listening in my car!

Glad you liked it Bill.

Is #10 Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, performing Billy Strayhorn's "Isfahan"?

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Well, Hot Ptah has put me onto a different trail. Is the guitarist on 'Giant steps' Bob Devos?

MG

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TRACK ONE - "Darn that Dream". Impeccable technique, and/but a little stiff and/or "prepared" for my taste.

Yeah, that was my impression too (at least one of them). I'm actually surprised that this is a famous player. Gotta work on this. It almost sounds like a 7-string guitar when he hits the lower notes, but I don't want to jump to any conclusions. The tone (in that respect) might suggest someone like Bucky Pizzarelli (one of the first to use a 7-string), but the style and phrasing aren't saying Bucky to me. Hmm...

Why don't you say Bucky?

For the reasons I gave. The tone reminds me of Bucky, but not the style and phrasing. I have a few recordings by him, but not sure any of them are live, and they're fairly dated now. I don't know when this was recorded, but I suspect it's relatively recent, so maybe I'm just not familiar enough with the evolution of his playing...

... but if it IS Bucky, then that would mean you're giving it to us... so now I'm confused.

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TRACK ONE - "Darn that Dream". Impeccable technique, and/but a little stiff and/or "prepared" for my taste.

Yeah, that was my impression too (at least one of them). I'm actually surprised that this is a famous player. Gotta work on this. It almost sounds like a 7-string guitar when he hits the lower notes, but I don't want to jump to any conclusions. The tone (in that respect) might suggest someone like Bucky Pizzarelli (one of the first to use a 7-string), but the style and phrasing aren't saying Bucky to me. Hmm...

Why don't you say Bucky?

For the reasons I gave. The tone reminds me of Bucky, but not the style and phrasing. I have a few recordings by him, but not sure any of them are live, and they're fairly dated now. I don't know when this was recorded, but I suspect it's relatively recent, so maybe I'm just not familiar enough with the evolution of his playing...

... but if it IS Bucky, then that would mean you're giving it to us... so now I'm confused.

Yes it is Bucky.

Well, Hot Ptah has put me onto a different trail. Is the guitarist on 'Giant steps' Bob Devos?

MG

No it's not.

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TRACK ONE - "Darn that Dream". Impeccable technique, and/but a little stiff and/or "prepared" for my taste.

Yeah, that was my impression too (at least one of them). I'm actually surprised that this is a famous player. Gotta work on this. It almost sounds like a 7-string guitar when he hits the lower notes, but I don't want to jump to any conclusions. The tone (in that respect) might suggest someone like Bucky Pizzarelli (one of the first to use a 7-string), but the style and phrasing aren't saying Bucky to me. Hmm...

Why don't you say Bucky?

For the reasons I gave. The tone reminds me of Bucky, but not the style and phrasing. I have a few recordings by him, but not sure any of them are live, and they're fairly dated now. I don't know when this was recorded, but I suspect it's relatively recent, so maybe I'm just not familiar enough with the evolution of his playing...

... but if it IS Bucky, then that would mean you're giving it to us... so now I'm confused.

Yes it is Bucky.

Well, I guess I didn't trust myself enough. The tone is definitely Bucky, and like I said, it sounds like an "oldtimer"- particularly the rhythmic feel toward the end of the solo (almost like a banjo attack, and Bucky played banjo before guitar). I think I was thrown by those single-line trills and what I perceived to be a little trouble with finding the swing pocket. I still would say that this isn't the best of Bucky.

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TRACK ONE - "Darn that Dream". Impeccable technique, and/but a little stiff and/or "prepared" for my taste.

Yeah, that was my impression too (at least one of them). I'm actually surprised that this is a famous player. Gotta work on this. It almost sounds like a 7-string guitar when he hits the lower notes, but I don't want to jump to any conclusions. The tone (in that respect) might suggest someone like Bucky Pizzarelli (one of the first to use a 7-string), but the style and phrasing aren't saying Bucky to me. Hmm...

Why don't you say Bucky?

For the reasons I gave. The tone reminds me of Bucky, but not the style and phrasing. I have a few recordings by him, but not sure any of them are live, and they're fairly dated now. I don't know when this was recorded, but I suspect it's relatively recent, so maybe I'm just not familiar enough with the evolution of his playing...

... but if it IS Bucky, then that would mean you're giving it to us... so now I'm confused.

Yes it is Bucky.

Well, I guess I didn't trust myself enough. The tone is definitely Bucky, and like I said, it sounds like an "oldtimer"- particularly the rhythmic feel toward the end of the solo (almost like a banjo attack, and Bucky played banjo before guitar). I think I was thrown by those single-line trills and what I perceived to be a little trouble with finding the swing pocket. I still would say that this isn't the best of Bucky.

I think Bucky's playing was deliberate on this recording, to sound like a banjo. The music is mainly Dixieland on this recording, and just about any Dixieland band would have used banjo instead of guitar.

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Could you answer the guess I have already posted, is #10 Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center

Jazz Orchestra playing Strayhorn's "Ishafan"?

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Hints in general would be welcome, yeah.

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Could you answer the guess I have already posted, is #10 Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center

Jazz Orchestra playing Strayhorn's "Ishafan"?

No it's not Wynton and the Lincoln Jazz Orchestra.

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Could you answer the guess I have already posted, is #10 Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center

Jazz Orchestra playing Strayhorn's "Ishafan"?

With the exception of the last track, all the other soloist on these selections are alive and out there playing today.

#1 Bucky was identified by Jim R.

#2 It is a male and his main instrument if alto sax. He filled some big shoes when he was asked to join a band in the mid 70s.

#3 This one, as with number 2, the flute is not his main instrument. His is tenor sax.

#4 Joey DeFrancesco was identified, the guitarist is still not guessed. I would look at who is in Joey DeFrancesco band today.

#5 This hint will give it away, but I am going to give it. Think of Ponce de León.

#6,#7 I am give these away with this hint. These two tenor players are a year apart in age and both older than anyone on this forum.

#8 This one, Bobby Hutcherson was identified. I don't know if anyone knows who the trombone player is. He was new to me, but very skilled. The tenor player is from Chicago. The piano player, who is the lead of this band wasn't born in the US. The trumpet player is from California. Bass and drums, don't solo, but both musicians are big name musicians.

#9 One of my all time favorite piano players. Like 6 and 7, he is older than anyone on thus forum.

#10 This band is from Europe. The group's name was derived from an American Mime Troupe that was touring Amsterdam back in the 1970s. At least that's what their web site states.

#11 This guitarist and pianist are from France.

#12 This band is from Italy. I guess this hint is not much help.

#13 The tenor player was identified as Frank Wess, the vocalist sang in a well known big band/orchestra.

#14 The Great Guitarist. This should be enough to get it.

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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Sorry for the late post, Tom - unfortunately I got nothing to add as no tracks jumped out to me with obvious candidates.

I did like the idea of repeating familiar tunes back to back. OTOH, as a general rule, flautist = meh, at least for me. :)

Thanks Tom and I am looking forward to a few answers - 8 and 10 for sure, and 5 for it being such a WTF track.

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Sorry for the late post, Tom - unfortunately I got nothing to add as no tracks jumped out to me with obvious candidates.

I did like the idea of repeating familiar tunes back to back. OTOH, as a general rule, flautist = meh, at least for me. :)

Thanks Tom and I am looking forward to a few answers - 8 and 10 for sure, and 5 for it being such a WTF track.

Maybe I can reveal #5 now. I thought for sure someone would get this one the first day.

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"Ponce De Leon" to me = "Fountain Of Youth" or Florida, so either Clark Terry or Ira Sullivan is all that readily comes to mind. Already been told that it's not Clark Terry, and would be shocked if it was Ira Sullivan.

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Tom clued me in but I'm not gonna add anything to what he's said. :P

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"Ponce De Leon" to me = "Fountain Of Youth" or Florida, so either Clark Terry or Ira Sullivan is all that readily comes to mind. Already been told that it's not Clark Terry, and would be shocked if it was Ira Sullivan.

He worked with Lester Young from 1947 to 1949. He also appears in Grand Theft Auto IV as a radio host on the soundtrack to the game.

Owen

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Ah, Roy Haynes!

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