Hardbopjazz

BFT 107 discussion thread

73 posts in this topic

I still don't think of Roy Haynes as "old"...funny how that works.

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Yeah he's old but he looks ... hardly old at all.

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I still don't think of Roy Haynes as "old"...funny how that works.

When you're 86/87 and can still do this, you not too old.

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Another hint. #2. His first solo album came out in 1974.

Here is a photo of his hands and horn.

post-642-0-05661700-1361457328_thumb.jpg

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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#3. The first recording I have with him dates back to 1948 with Howard McGhee, although there may be an earlier one.

The guitarist first recording I am aware of is from 1978. I don't recall this Columbia album by this band ever coming out on CD. I do have the vinyl.

#6. The tenor player is also on anther track in the BFT. I had him twice to try an fool the listeners.

#7. I am giving this away with this hint. (William)Bill Evans..

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#8. Bobby Hutcherson was correctly identified. The pianist first professional gigs were with Joe Henderson, That's what this person stated. The other musicians I will reveal later.

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#3. The first recording I have with him dates back to 1948 with Howard McGhee, although there may be an earlier one.

The guitarist first recording I am aware of is from 1978. I don't recall this Columbia album by this band ever coming out on CD. I do have the vinyl.

The hint implies Jimmy Heath & Tony Purrone w/The Heath Brothers, but I don't know this Columbia side if it is them?

#7. I am giving this away with this hint. (William)Bill Evans..

YUSEF!!!

Edited by JSngry

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#3. The first recording I have with him dates back to 1948 with Howard McGhee, although there may be an earlier one.

The guitarist first recording I am aware of is from 1978. I don't recall this Columbia album by this band ever coming out on CD. I do have the vinyl.

The hint implies Jimmy Heath & Tony Purrone w/The Heath Brothers, but I don't know this Columbia side if it is them?

#7. I am giving this away with this hint. (William)Bill Evans..

YUSEF!!!

Yes it is.

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I find this non-commercially-released item for a Heath/Purrone IASM, but that's it...is this the cut?

http://www.jazzdiscography.com/Leaders/HeathJimmy-ldr.php

Date: July 15, 1989

Location: Montreux Jazz Festival - Platinum, Montreux, Switzerland

Label: [radio broadcast]

Jimmy Heath (ldr), Jimmy Heath (f, ss, ts), Tony Purrone (g), Ben Brown (b), Akira Tana (d) a. 01 Prince Albert (Kenny Dorham) b. 02 In A Sentimental Mood (Duke Ellington, Manny Kurtz, Irving Mills) c. 03 Hi-Fly (Randy Weston)

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I find this non-commercially-released item for a Heath/Purrone IASM, but that's it...is this the cut?

http://www.jazzdisco...thJimmy-ldr.php

Date: July 15, 1989

Location: Montreux Jazz Festival - Platinum, Montreux, Switzerland

Label: [radio broadcast]

Jimmy Heath (ldr), Jimmy Heath (f, ss, ts), Tony Purrone (g), Ben Brown (b), Akira Tana (d) a. 01 Prince Albert (Kenny Dorham) b. 02 In A Sentimental Mood (Duke Ellington, Manny Kurtz, Irving Mills) c. 03 Hi-Fly (Randy Weston)

So you're doing a little sleuthing? This is correct too. Well done.

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Wouldn't know Heath's flute sound (obviously!), but it is very nice, very developed. A pleasure to hear, and thanks for putting it on display.!

But what was that about a Heath Brothers Columbia LP that never made it to CD? That's the Public Theater thing, right? And..not relevant to this BFT cut? Or am I getting all bimbamblippied about all this?

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Tony Purrone first recording I am aware of is a Heath Brothers record. As far as I know "Passin' Thru" hasn't made it to CD. I never found it.

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Ah, I see.

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As usual, I haven't read anything in this thread, even though it's late in the month. I enjoyed most of this BFT, in spite of some critical comments below. I recognized absolutely nobody - but for me, that's not the point of these BFTs.

1. “Darn That Dream,” of course. At first I thought it was Tal Farlow, with his A string tuned down an octave, as he liked to do on ballads. As the song progressed, the guitarist sounded less like Farlow. It’s pretty good playing, but whoever it is overdid the little bebop turn, the little flick up to the next note up the scale. That got tiresome, but this is a very accomplished guitarist.

2. Okay, I like jazz musicians to have an individual sound and style. But this flutist’s sound and style annoy me. He/she seems incapable of holding out a sustained tone for any length of time, and the strategy of compensating for that by substituting short, repeated notes wears thin quickly. And in the low register, the sound disappears almost completely. The actual improvisation is not bad at all, but the method of delivery totally ruined it for me. And I hope I haven’t just slammed someone I admire.

3. Programming really helped here. If I had heard this relatively “safe” version of “In a Sentimental Mood” just out of the blue, I might have been kind of indifferent to it. But the flutist’s beautiful sound and command of the instrument is such a contrast to the previous version that I was on board from the first note. Again, nothing that adventurous here - I actually liked the guitar solo better than the flute solo – but it’s someone who can clearly play. And he/she can play soprano, too!

4. I don’t particularly like “Giant Steps,” because almost everybody who plays it (including Coltrane) sounds like they’re running exercises, not making music. But these guys do pretty well – their lines are fast, but melodic. Well done, and probably wise to make it short.

5. Someone’s having fun.

6. “But Beautiful” is indeed a beautiful song. And this is a good version, with a virtuoso saxophonist who only occasionally unleashes his/her virtuosity. Nice sound, too.

7. I like this even better than the last version of “But Beautiful” – the saxophone sound has character, and he/she doesn’t overplay. The pianist is very good (although I hate the way the piano is recorded), although I wish he or she would maybe play a little less. The saxophonist’s improvising fits the mood of the song better.

8. Mr. Henderson’s “Recorda Me,” played competently in a performance that leaves me cold. I just feel like everything these guys are saying, I’ve heard many times before.

9. I don’t know who’s playing “Monk’s Mood” here. Playing Monk’s music is tricky – you’ve got to keep the Monkian character and still try to project something of your own personality. This doesn’t work for me – I don’t hear that this pianist understood Monk’s message at all. I like it better when it turns into “Body and Soul” – a bit over-the-top for me, but very accomplished.

10. Wow – it takes guts for an alto saxophonist to take on a Johnny Hodges feature. This is “Isfahan,” and I like it because the altoist is so different from Hodges. Nicely done! When the trombonist steps out briefly, it sounds like Roswell Rudd – but it probably isn’t. Interesting ensemble, and again, I really like the alto player’s approach.

11. Wonderful atmosphere. Everyone’s listening to each other, and extending that atmosphere without disrupting it. Very nice.

12. I like various kinds of “world music,” but my first reaction was that this was too conservative for my tastes. But the guitarist, and even more so the accordionist, improvise passionately and imaginatively. This is probably not something I would seek out to hear again, but I enjoyed it.

13. My feeling on “jazz singers” have evolved, or devolved, or regressed over the years. As a young man, I gravitated to those singers who improvised more, who took more liberties with the melody. Now I’m an old fogey who wants to hear the melody. I liked the fat-toned tenor player’s reading of “Easy Living” more than the singer’s. She was good, though – a wonderful voice and fluid approach. Some of her digressions from the tune seemed kind of cliché to me, but this wasn’t bad.

14. This was fun. After they shifted gears from the Django tune, I should have hated it, but the poppy “Think I’m Going Out of My Head” was just – well, fun. I enjoyed this one.

Thanks for a good one.

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I wondered if that might be Hutcherson on the Joe Henderson tune, but it didn't seem to be, well, good enough. Or maybe my interest in the track was waning by that point.

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I wondered if that might be Hutcherson on the Joe Henderson tune, but it didn't seem to be, well, good enough. Or maybe my interest in the track was waning by that point.

It was Hutcherson on vibes.

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Okay, nothing like the last minute... will post this quick and then look over the thread and the answers. Thanks for all your efforts Tom!

1 - "Darn That Dream." I like this. The guitar player has a nice, classic sort of sound, but takes a few interesting twists and turns in his solo. The only thing that was weird for me is that things really start to groove...right before the tune ends. Seems like they could have gone to a different place there. This is good stuff though.

2 - "In a Semi-mental Mood" as some folks call it on the bandstand (around here anyway)... and this is a beautiful rendition. I have no good guesses as to the players, but I do like the flute player quite a bit. I suppose it couldn't be someone as obvious as Yusef Lateef? Very interesting solo, nice "breathy" tone. Cool bass solo, whoever the bass player is has a sort of European sound to my ears. Anxious to know who this is.

3 - Hmmm...obviously a more modern version than the last one. Electric bass! My personal preference is track #2 over this one. This is a little too 'sterile' for me...that may not be exactly the right word, but this just isn't getting to me emotionally like #2 did.

4 - Fun rendition of "Giant Steps," but so short! No clues on this one...it was nice, but not enough meat there for me, they didn't really have enough time to get into anything.

5 - Haha...funny stuff! I'm sure I will be amused to find out who this is.

6 - "But Beautiful." I really like the sax player on this, but the funky sound really got in the way of my fully enjoying it...there is some kind of noise gate or something that sounds really screwy here, I felt like there was no decay on the sax sound at all. I should be commenting more about the music itself, but that was really a distraction for me. I did like what the sax player was doing though. This has got to be from the 70s or early 80s, based on the sound (apart from the noise gate thing I mentioned).

7 - And another! This has got to be roughly the same vintage as the last one...the bass player has a similar, growly kind of tone. Nice buttery-smooth sounds from the sax here. I enjoyed the piano solo very much too.

8 - "Recordame"...whoa, crazy key change after the intro. This is a speedy little version. The trombone solo is great, but the vibes solo is even better. The vibes player sounds influenced by Hutcherson, if it's not him. I should know a lot of these players, they sound familiar but I can't place them. Especially the trumpet player. Nice solos all around. The tenor solo is a standout though...great ideas, and I like the Borodin quote.

9 - "Body and Soul"...nice version. Didn't totally grab me, but it was pleasant.

10 - Ahhh! I know this, but the brain cells are failing at the moment...damn. What the heck is this? I know this one is gonna be embarrassing, because I should definitely be able to ID this one. Ellington, right? Now I'm angry at myself. I will just say that it's fantastic, beautiful, perfect. I love that sax sound. Damn. I am an idiot.

11 - Interesting. I am not sure what this is, but I feel the spirit of Charlie Haden in here. Stylistically it feel close to Haden and Frisell to me, but I don't think it is. No, now that I hear the bass solo that's definitely not Haden. I like it though. Really nice tune...haunting stuff.

12 - This is not really my flavor, but it was very nicely done for what it was.

13 - "Easy Living." Nice version...I like the singer. Great mellow, laid back feel, good stuff.

14 - Is one of the guitars Jim Hall? I don't know the tune, but it's a good 'un. Wow...that was an about face... "I Think I'm Going Out of My Head"? That was interesting. Kind of an odd transition there, but this is kind of fun overall. I'm really stumped now though.

Thanks again! Will now poke around to see how far off I was on the few that I was actually able to try and guess... :)

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Wow, I am the only one who preferred the flute player on #2 to #3!

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8 This is a bit louder. ‘Blue bossa’. So, a trombonist with one of those modern thin sounds with no vibrato worth mentioning; thousands of them knocking about. I have a feeling that the vibes player may be Booby Hutcherson, mainly because, between him and the piano player, they sound like they do on the Hutcherson BN album at Montreux.

It is Bobby Hutcherson on vibes.

Aha! So, is the pianist Cecil Bernard, too?

MG

No it isn't Bernard

Oh well, I give up. :D

MG

You can't screen uncle yet. You know who all of these players are, with the exceptions of the bones player. This was the first time I ever heard him.

Now I've seen who it is, I've gotta say I've never heard of any of those guys, apart from Hutcherson. I may have heard some of them, but never knowingly. See, I don't know a lot about modern jazz.

MG

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Better late than never, right? RIGHT??? I haven't looked at the answers, which should become obvious rather quickly! :g

Track 1: My first thought was Johnny Smith "Darn That Dream" from one of his Roost trio records, but then the piano came in, so now we call it "Dash That Guess." (ha!) I still think it's Smith, though, and thought for a second it was from the same session that gave us that wonderful song featured on the previous BFT, "Land of the Wisconsin Velveeta Chills." (Datsa for my bossa, Jim R). But I checked the CD, and it's not. So, final answer: Johnny Smith, "Darn That Dream," and I'm too lazy to investigate further!

Track 2: I haaaaaaaate when I know the tune, but I forget the title! I mean, I can even hear Tony Bennett singing this in my mind! He did this at Carnegie Hall! My brain keeps yelling "SOLITUDE" or "SOMEONE TO WATCH OVER ME," and I keep yelling back "IT AIN'T EITHER OF THEM, SO SHUDDUP ALREADY!!!" Oh, I'm gonna be kicking myself once I see the answer.

On an unrelated note, my son has a friend in marching band with him who is an expert flute-player (she made the All-State Band on the piccolo; y'all should hear her play the trills from "Night on Bald Mountain," it will send shivers down your spine!). Her style of playing, her intonation, is very similar to the player on this track, who I'm gonna guess is Herbie Mann.

Track 3: Now that's just mean! I'm still blanking out on the song title! This sounds like Hubert Laws to me, though. A lot of things I'm hearing here I've heard in his other work. Well, then that sax comes in. Maybe Ronnie? Maybe I'm wrong on both accounts and it's the same person on both sax AND flute?

Track 4: Wait, wasn't this on an earlier BFT? Ah well, one can never have too many greeeeazy versions of "Giant Steps!" Oh hey, that sounds like Grant Green on guitar! Sounds like the Mighty Trinity of Greeeaze (Patton, Green, Dixon)! Ah, if only!

Track 5: Love it!!! This SO made me giggle! "SING that part, dammit!" :lol:

Track 6: Nice, despite not really making any impression on me. Might sound better in a non-work environment (which is where I'm currently writing this)

Track 7: A very beautiful "But Beautiful!" Whoever this is caresses this with such finesse, plays just the right amount of music so that no note, no breath, nothing is wasted. This is like a good massage for the heart AND soul.

The piano player, on the other hand, seems to have graduated from the Oscar Peterson School of Subtlety....

Track 8: "Recorda Me" or whatever Joe was calling it in the 70's. I thought it was Joe's version with Curtis Fuller on Milestone, but after listening to that version, this definitely ain't that. No clue, as usual, but that trombone player is getting DOWN and I love it!!!

Track 9: "Body and Soul," as played by someone trying to sound like Monk by apeing as many of his styles as possible, with some success.

Track 10: "Autumn in New York," and I dig how they try to make it sound like a rainy dreary autumn day, where everyone else usually tries to paint a picture of sunshine, cool air, leaves changing colors, etc. Not these guys. It's cold, rainy, yucky, dreary, and lonely. This is the kind of day I used to love to go to the downtown library, curl up with a book in one of the big chairs that looked out the window to the railroad tracks, watch the traffic go by and watch the trains go by.

Track 11: Nice. Nothing beyond that, though, since I don't recognize the tune or the players. But I'd listen to it again in a heartbeat!

Track 12: Rather enjoyed this until whoever decided to start singing (?) along with the accordion and the guitar. Then that... what is that, a bass clarinet? I feel like I should like this a lot more than I do right now, but it's really trying my patience.

Track 13: This is like the "Name That Tune" from Hell! You wouldn't know by looking at this, but the above answers have been heavily edited after my first guesses were "I should KNOW this tune!" and then finally figuring it out halfway through. Plus, with the repeated tunes, I'm getting confused even more! OH well, enough whining! I love the guitar accompaniment to this, that wonderful Freddie-Green-rhythm. Love it love it love it!!! Oh, a singer, and a nice one at that! Just wish he/she woulda sung the title, but apparently it's not to be! Geeeeeeeeeezzz!!!

Track 14: Two guitars, strings... sounds like Joe Pass & Joe Pisano? Doesn't matter: ME LIKEY!!! What the... are they freakin' kidding me? "Goin' Outta My Head?" That... is... GENIUS!!! This just went from the sublime to the ridiculous and took sublime as hostage, and I... FREAKIN... LOVE IT!!!

Whatta BFT! Lotsnlotsa good stuff here! Now to read the comments & hope that nobody else does the same! :)

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Late to the dance.

  1. Very nice. Is this I Guess I’ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry? Getting some odd crackling in the left channel. Probably my cheap earbuds, but I’m at work and need to use them because the background noise is too loud. GAH! I like this. This is a weird analogy, but sounds almost like Jimmy Giuffre might sound playing a guitar.

  1. In a Sentimental Mood. I’d say by a flutist, not a doubler. Nice. The staccato stuff in the head is a bit overstated for my taste, but overall, this has a nice, relaxing feel.

  1. Nice full tone. Is that an alto flute? Seems like more of a doubler – the lines seem more sax like. Maybe somebody like Harold Vick. Same song, I’m not enjoying the soprano as much as the flute. Sounds a great deal like Vick to me.

  1. Really Big Stair Cases. I’m one of two sax players who don’t like this tune. This seems to work out okay, but I’m not really interested. Joey D?

  1. A little Kenny Rogers for your trouble. I believe the composer was Don Schlitz, but I won’t pretend to know who that is – just a piece of useless information I possess. Brings back positive memories of poker night in high school. This us fun.

  1. Despite the thin sound, this is very nice. Making it hard to ID the sax player, but seems very familiar. A little Junior, a little Rouse… I need to know who this is. Shades of J-Griff in the ballad style. I like this a lot.

  1. Nice ballad style. Very heavy Yusef influence to my ear. Very versed in bop lines with a nice, big, fat sound. Could this be Junior? Sounds maybe a shade younger than him. Nice, tasteful piano solo. [Phones are getting worse and the student band is rehearsing Kansas – AAAAAARGHHH!] Very Yusef-influenced vibrato. Pretty, soulful. Again, sounds like someone I know, but I can’t hear it with authority.

  1. Recordame. A very schooled, 80s sound to it. Definitely a conservatory guy on tenor. Somebody out of that Billy Pierce school, but I’m thinking earlier rather than later, because there is an underlying sense of story. He plays with a sense of dynamics (most of the modern guys don’t, to my ear). Not much of an impression made by the others (though that’s probably my bias towards the tenor that makes it stand out more to me). Good players, for sure.

  1. Monk’s Mood? (No matter what I guess on a Monk title, I’ll be wrong!) Lost the feel as he sped up – just got too busy.

  1. Isfahan. Gorgeous tune. Sounds European to me, and by that I mean, it doesn’t swing. Drummer is somewhat out to lunch. During the head, alto was paying nice homage to Rabbit; in the solo, he goes more towards himself, which is good, but I’m not sure I’m digging who that is. Seems very heady, lots of ‘notes’ as opposed to feeling.

  1. I like this feel immediately, even though it shares that European identity (to my ears). It reaches me instantly. Sounds like someone who has listened to Grant Green a lot (and this is a good thing). Piano has a Steve Kuhn feel to it, though not as abstract. This music would drive my Dad nuts, but I like this a lot. Very personal bass sound. Even when he ventures into Scot LaFaro land, he’s got me. Digging this a lot.

  1. Interesting instrumentation, captured me right away, but didn’t maintain my interest as strongly once I became accustomed to the sound. I like the sound, but I’m not sure how often I would listen to it. Kudos to whomever it is for taking an authentically different approach. The guitar is a little to Windam Hill for my tastes. Not sure I’m totally in, but I am acutely interested in finding out who it is.

  1. Easy Living by a big-boned sounding tenor, though I wish s/he would let that tone sing instead of cutting it off like that. Somewhat familiar sounding voice, but I’m not sure who it is. Singing it like a horn player would play it.

  1. Curses! What’s the name of this? Well, now I really think I’m going out of my head. ;) Time to go look.

Thanks for hooking a brother up after the fact to take a shot at this. Lots here for the ear to get around.

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Very happy to learn about #7. No wonder I enjoyed it so much! I should have gotten Randy Weston, and my [in]ability to identify track names is embarrassing.

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