JSngry

Money For Nothing? Nothing For Money?

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http://www.dustygroove.com/item/685227

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The quietest record you'll ever own – because there's no sounds at all pressed on the disc! The collection is a stunning celebration of the use of silence in records – and features selections by artists from a surprisingly wide range of styles – all of whom create pieces of silence to use alongside more sonically stimulating material – often with some sort of social comment in the practice! Yet despite the lack of any sound at all, the record is faithfully banded to show the duration of each number – and an extended listen produces a John Cage-like contemplation of nothingness that's surprisingly compelling – especially when it comes in a package as attractive as this. Titles include "Silence" by Robert Wyatt, "There's A Riot Going On" by Sly & The Family Stone, "Nutopian International Anthem" by John Lennon, "The Sound Of Free Speech" by Crass, "Silence" by Ciccone Youth, "Disco Party (part 2)" by Son Of Pete, "Silence (Copyright 1932)" by Andy Warhol, "Anniversary Of World War III" by West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band, "9-11-01" by Soulfly, and "The Ballad Of Richard Nixon" by John Denver. (Limited pressing of 500 copies.) © 1996-2014, Dusty Groove, Inc.

So...if this has been done legally (HA!), I assume that fees were paid to use the song titles, even if they are are just silence "tracks",

But if not done legally, is there a lawsuit here? You stole my silence?

If a sucker is born every minute and nobody is there to fleece them, does it still make a record?

And yes, I do remember The Best Of Marcel Marceau..

bestofmarcelmarceau.jpg

MARCEL-bsmall.jpg

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The sickest part being there is some over-the-top audiophile out there who will get this and listen to it intently. Then tell anyone who will listen to his insane ramblings how fascinating the varying timbres of silence were. And how his "highly resolving" rig really brought out the nuance of each piece, and how you could hear the size of each room the silent passages were recorded in.

Not to mention track 6 on a continuous loop for an hour because he swears he can hear the producer breathing in the next room over.

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The sickest part being there is some over-the-top audiophile out there who will get this and listen to it intently. Then tell anyone who will listen to his insane ramblings how fascinating the varying timbres of silence were. And how his "highly resolving" rig really brought out the nuance of each piece, and how you could hear the size of each room the silent passages were recorded in.

Not that much crazier than what a music scribe once stated in mockery: "No doubt there are fans out there who will be all excited to go out and buy a 24-LP box set of Elvis brushing his teeth." (Jazz lovers might like to substitute Bird or Miles here :D )

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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I'd like to hear the sounds of anti-audiophile silence.

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I believe there is no copyright on titles. A few years ago I wrote a poem which later became a song since a musican I know wrote music to it. One day I decided to look for my title on the net and I saw the exact same title as mine which was written some time before I had written mine. I didn't know that, I had come up with the title myself and I had already registered my work and the song with lyrics and melody. After some research I found out that lyrics are protected, like a poem is. Music as well, not the changes or the progression of the chords but the melody itself. A title is only seen as copyrighted when it is some sort of trademark, I can't recall the exact description right now. So I was relieved I didn't violated any laws and I needn't had to change my title.

Edited by page

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That's true, which is how Rodgers and Hammerstein could write a "Shall We Dance" after the Gershwins and Paul Weller a "You Do Something To Me" after Cole Porter.

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No mention about who remastered this or how good the transfers are. Can anyone report back? :-)

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The sickest part being there is some over-the-top audiophile out there who will get this and listen to it intently. Then tell anyone who will listen to his insane ramblings how fascinating the varying timbres of silence were. And how his "highly resolving" rig really brought out the nuance of each piece, and how you could hear the size of each room the silent passages were recorded in.

Not that much crazier than what a music scribe once stated in mockery: "No doubt there are fans out there who will be all excited to go out and buy a 24-LP box set of Elvis brushing his teeth." (Jazz lovers might like to substitute Bird or Miles here :D )

Exactly!

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If it's available for smartphone, I could listen to nothing wherever I please.

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The audiophile satire is based in stereotypicals (or should that be atypical stereos). Old jokes are still jokes, and I'd rather live in a world with bad jokes than one with bad jokers.

But...........................let's again ask a reality-based question - does anybody get paid off of this? Lennon's people for "Nutopian International Anthem", Sly for "There's A Riot Going On"? etc.I'm pretty sure that copyright was filed on each of these before being published/released on a recording.

It seems bizarre they they would, but it seems equally bizarre that they wouldn't.

Ant that cover...somebody had to pay for that, or will be made to pay. I mean, if the Kind Of Bloop guy got busted...

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http://www.dustygroove.com/item/685227

So...if this has been done legally (HA!), I assume that fees were paid to use the song titles, even if they are are just silence "tracks",

But if not done legally, is there a lawsuit here? You stole my silence?

If a sucker is born every minute and nobody is there to fleece them, does it still make a record?

And yes, I do remember The Best Of Marcel Marceau..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Hgkjph8grs

Inspired?
Well done! :D
Edited by Cyril

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John Cage's 4'33 by William Marx...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTEFKFiXSx4

All music is sound. All sound is music :)

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The audiophile satire is based in stereotypicals (or should that be atypical stereos). Old jokes are still jokes, and I'd rather live in a world with bad jokes than one with bad jokers.

But...........................let's again ask a reality-based question - does anybody get paid off of this? Lennon's people for "Nutopian International Anthem", Sly for "There's A Riot Going On"? etc.I'm pretty sure that copyright was filed on each of these before being published/released on a recording.

It seems bizarre they they would, but it seems equally bizarre that they wouldn't.

Ant that cover...somebody had to pay for that, or will be made to pay. I mean, if the Kind Of Bloop guy got busted...

Well, it's actually a interesting question. Are titles without an actual accompanying track still IP? The track is copyrighted, but is the title? I wouldn't think so.

Edited by Scott Dolan

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I'm wondering is this a copyrighted image?

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Ant that cover...somebody had to pay for that, or will be made to pay. I mean, if the Kind Of Bloop guy got busted...

Well, like I said at that thread then. pictures are copyrighted as well, so I'd expect that yes. That cover of "sound of silence" is well known, and the owner of the work deserves to be compensated for the use of it. Btw an artist has copyright as soon as a work is created. You do not need to declare or register your work anywhere but it helps when you do so since you can prove a work is yours or was already yours at a certain time. When you'd ask permission first, an artist might be honoured and might give his/her permission without asking for money, f.e. when it is for use of something non-commercial.

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I wish they'd issue a boxed set collating all the silences just before Schnabel's fingers touched the keyboard.

Peerless quiet. Such lack of touch; such absence of tone.

Though, of course, I find Horowitz's silences to be 'finer'.

Burble, burble, burble zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.......

Edited by A Lark Ascending

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The original side 4 of Keith Jarrett's 'Eyes of the Heart' was silent (just as well it was an ECM pressing!).

Can only be a matter of time before it's reissued as a 2 CD set restoring side 4 (currently it is a single, incomplete, CD).

Don't think I ever played more than a minute or two out of curiosity. So it may not be silent. There might be the odd grunt.

Edited by A Lark Ascending

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Ant that cover...somebody had to pay for that, or will be made to pay. I mean, if the Kind Of Bloop guy got busted...

Well, like I said at that thread then. pictures are copyrighted as well, so I'd expect that yes. That cover of "sound of silence" is well known, and the owner of the work deserves to be compensated for the use of it. Btw an artist has copyright as soon as a work is created. You do not need to declare or register your work anywhere but it helps when you do so since you can prove a work is yours or was already yours at a certain time. When you'd ask permission first, an artist might be honoured and might give his/her permission without asking for money, f.e. when it is for use of something non-commercial.

Back in the old days artists would mail their copyrighted material to themselves so that they'd have them in a time stamped, unopened envelope.

Not sure if many still do that, but I found that fact to be pretty fascinating when I first learned of it many moons ago.

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No mention about who remastered this or how good the transfers are. Can anyone report back? :-)

Mastering will no doubt show excessive compression and loudness.

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No mention about who remastered this or how good the transfers are. Can anyone report back? :-)

Mastering will no doubt show excessive compression and loudness.

FTW!!!!

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The photographer should definitely be paid unless taking the photo was part of a Columbia employee's job. Seems like the songwriters should get royalties too since their names are next to the song titles on the liners.

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Can any of these silences be added to fix some of Keith Jarrett's more vociferous recordings?

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Maybe this record i s a joke, but since John Cage, the conceptual uses of silence have been the subject of study:

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No Such Thing as Silence John Cage's 4'33" Kyle Gann, Yale University Press.

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