Hardbopjazz

Great Solos In Blue Note Records History

14 posts in this topic

To me this and so many other lists are so subjective, but here is a list of the greatest solos in the history of Blue Note Records.

Blue Note Records has been many things over the course of its 75 years: a label responsible for blinding jazz innovations, a home for the titans of hard bop and soul jazz, a place for smart, sly, jazz-inflected pop creations.

One constant running throughout its history is improvisation. Its records have showcased jazz soloing in every possible mood and temperament. Its artists, both the jazz legends and those journeymen who are little regarded today, have helped shape the ever-evolving notion of what a solo is and what it can be.

To honor the label, we've combed the vaults to select 75 singular solos, some sprawling over multiple heroic choruses, some lasting just a crisp few measures. The idea was not to showcase the label's "greatest hits" — that would be impossible — but rather works that offer meaningful insights into the art of improvisation and the company's deep history. Enjoy.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/ablogsupreme/2014/05/28/316713372/take-75-great-solos-in-blue-note-records-history?ft=1&f=1039

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Without looking, I bet that Fred Jackson's baritone solo on the title track of 'The way I feel' isn't included :D

MG

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Well, I was right, no baritone solos mentioned AT ALL! Not even Pepper Adam's on 'Baptismal' from Turrentine's 'Rough & tumble'.

I counted that I have only 22 of those listed, even though I see I have 322 Blue Note albums. Obviously I'm not a jazz fan :)

MG

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That's kind of silly and arbitrary. There's a Bechet solo, but it ain't "Blue Horizon."

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I'm not gonna bitch too much - Gene Harris got some respect, for once. :g

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Weren't some of those recordings made on non-BN labels that were later acquired?

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Well, I was right, no baritone solos mentioned AT ALL! Not even Pepper Adam's on 'Baptismal' from Turrentine's 'Rough & tumble'.

MG

Pepper's listed under "other reeds".

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I know all lists are subjective...BUT how could Joe Henderson make the list but not his solo on IDLE MOMENTS from Grant Green's IDLE MOMENTS? I doubt if he had 75 solos better than that. :rolleyes:

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Joe Henderson has some cracking solo's all over the catalogue, one that never seems to get a mention is the one he does on Hubbard's 'Blue Spirits', maybe 'cos Big Black comes in later with his crappy conga thing.. I wouldn't argue about Monk's 'Well You Needn't', that's a jaw-dropper fo' sure. Other than that, a list of usual suspects with a few talking point choices thrown in. Standard fare for the uninitiated.

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Well, I was right, no baritone solos mentioned AT ALL! Not even Pepper Adam's on 'Baptismal' from Turrentine's 'Rough & tumble'.

MG

Pepper's listed under "other reeds".

Yes, you're right. I don't know the Lee Morgan record at all, so I scarcely noticed its mention.

MG

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grant green's best solo is on "joshua fit"? imo not when you got stuff like "it aint necessarily so", "back talk", "street of dreams", "brazil" "caracas", "surrey with the fringe on top", "round midnight", basically every solo on grantstand and the george braith recordings, just to name a few.

also eddie mcfadden deserves an entry. i'd pick any solo from JOS' "Cherokee"

Edited by hgweber

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Who compiles these lists? What credence do these people have? It could never be objective. Now if a group of jazz musicians constructed the list, that would carry more weight; but maybe it was musicians that composed the list.

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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Agreed on McFadden, but its not like the casual jazz or new jazz fans the article caters to will know who he is. He's such a guitarist's guitarist. For McFadden with JOS I'd pick "Indiana" (from Groovin at Smalls) "Zing Went the Strings of my Heart" or "First Night Blues" from the February 1957 Mosaic. Perhaps the writer wasn't aware of Grant's "It Ain't Necessarily So" solo. How about Donald Byrd's great solo on "Places and Spaces"? just kidding! Sorry, an acquaintance of mine loves anything Mizell and the mid 70's BN catalog. We've argued about that stuf, I said there's great to very good stuff in that era of BN, you just have to find it. He of course he comes from a much different listening background from straight ahead, so it's understandable.

Edited by CJ Shearn

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