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A Lark Ascending

Is streaming technology saving the music industry?

411 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Scott Dolan said:

I don't understand your question, but no it isn't always free. I think most who use it only USE the free service, but I can't say for sure. I can count on one hand the number of times I've used a streaming service. 

Even though I gave up on physical media many years ago, I still prefer buying albums rather than listening to them on a streaming service. 

You wrote that they don't buy music in any format, just stream it. Streaming audio is emitted in several formats.

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Sure it is. But what I meant was they're not "buying" music. So they're not using iTunes, for example, to buy songs/albums. 

Even if they pay for upgraded streaming, I still don't consider that as buying music. They're simply paying for the privilege to access a large library of music. 

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1 hour ago, Dmitry said:

You make cds for restaurant play? You bring them with you when you go out to eat, or they already know what to play when you walk through the door?

It depended on the various situations, but it usually resulted in them asking me to provide music for them -
either in full or partial - after word got out or after I had offered something. For example:
at one place I had been providing music to their customers for so many years (over a dozen),
that I eventually ended up bringing in my 400-disc changer. I've even had situations where
I would arrive for lunch and would be given a business card or some other form of contact
that was left by a previous diner because they liked what they were hearing.
There was a time when I was providing music for at least 5 restaurants at one time.
I even did this on some overseas trips. Streaming services are the thing now, so...

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Streaming has proven a disaster for musicians IMCO. They don't get shit.

In saying that, I've now almost downloaded from Christmas 1988 to now my entire CD collection to FLAC and it's on several back-ups and I could easily give that away to someone for free.....

Rock music relied very much on mystic and needed to be rare. The record companies knew this and now you can get it all for almost free like water, its lost the hold and magic. But then again rock and pop music in the 60s, 70's and 80s sense is effectively dead. Like the swing bands.

I use to think that rock/pop music was the most dominant cultural force in the last four or five decades of the 20th century, I actually now believe we only thought that. We digged the marketing spin.

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CDs are dead? So that's the stench I've been smelling in my house!

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2 hours ago, rostasi said:

It depended on the various situations, but it usually resulted in them asking me to provide music for them -
either in full or partial - after word got out or after I had offered something. For example:
at one place I had been providing music to their customers for so many years (over a dozen),
that I eventually ended up bringing in my 400-disc changer. I've even had situations where
I would arrive for lunch and would be given a business card or some other form of contact
that was left by a previous diner because they liked what they were hearing.
There was a time when I was providing music for at least 5 restaurants at one time.
I even did this on some overseas trips. Streaming services are the thing now, so...

Cool stuff. I did the same a few times for a friend that owned a bar/restaurant. I also had the pleasure years ago of making cds for a friend's wedding reception/dinner since they were trying to avoid the usual DJ crap and it was a smaller setting.

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I'll momentarily enjoy the schadenfreude resulting from DJs being priced out of the market by friends with laptops and mix cds and such.

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2 hours ago, ArtSalt said:

 

I use to think that rock/pop music was the most dominant cultural force in the last four or five decades of the 20th century, I actually now believe we only thought that. We digged the marketing spin.

What was more dominant in the cultural landscape? 

 

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1 hour ago, catesta said:

Cool stuff. I did the same a few times for a friend that owned a bar/restaurant. I also had the pleasure years ago of making cds for a friend's wedding reception/dinner since they were trying to avoid the usual DJ crap and it was a smaller setting.

For a reception/dinner, some people may want a nuance
that's not usually readily available from a guy who may be
unable to "read" the room. One restaurant that I had been 
providing music for was kind of in limbo for a while when it
came to new ownership and the new woman decided that
she could provide her own tunes: consisting of either
"The Carpenters: Their Greatest Hits" or just turning the radio
dial to our local classical station. The young, "hip" crowd left
in droves. At another place, the new owner decided to just
turn on the local dance/hip-hop station - one of those where
even the announcer is Auto-Tuned? - and she'd have it on
really loud! This restaurant was originally known for it's rather
peaceful nature - healthy vegan food done in Chinese style?
You could imagine what happened then! :D

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20 hours ago, Scott Dolan said:

What was more dominant in the cultural landscape? 

 

I don't know: television, film?

If rock and pop was so culturally powerful, how has it fizzled to where it is no longer the zeigeist of our time? Perhaps, we only believe it was that central to everything.

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I think they key word in all of that is "was". 

If it isn't now, which I think is highly debatable, that doesn't mean that it wasn't then. 

Jazz was once popular music. Just because it's more a niche genre now doesn't change that. That history is already written and settled. 

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