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Man with the Golden Arm

bLiNdFoLd TeSt #7 - discussion

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Arrrgh! One I really thought I knew!

Track #1 -I know nothing of this guy's "real" thing and actually bought this disc, luckily for cheap, cause I liked the cover art!

So, am I to infer I'm not even close in thinking this was Sex Mob?

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Man if anybody gets #1 I'll be dipped! I will give a hint that this guy is from a Punk Rock background and it's not Barry Adamson. His first named band, of which I've never ventured to hear anything from, is something the extreme right fights for rights for. Frankly I don't even know who else is on the cut other than some girl who knows Lydia Lunch. Sex Mob is more of a real time band than this. It was really just for openers and that it lead well into a nice big band chart. But hey if you can twist to Alvin! then you can certainly dismember to this.

Track #13 is NOT an accordion. But the altoist is named after little pickled somethings that fancy chefs put on everything from pizza to pesce. I've never heard of him before this.

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And Big Al is onto #6 (nice pick) and right up with Nate if you jump Jackie or jump backward from #7 per your disclaimer.

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Second run through.

Track 1. Still cannot come up with anything better than Van Rooyen or Porcini. It's not the Cinematic Orchestra, and I'm pretty sure it's not Amon Tobin either, although there are definitive pointers in both their direction. Frickin' Fabulous Stuff though! I love the knife-sharpening sounds and the couwbells.

Track 2. Somebody tell me more about that drum pattern that sets in around the 2:10 mark

Track 3. Something is yelling "French!" through my head. Alto may be Fol following that hint. Damn! This definitely has a Gainsbourg quality, but it's not him. Might be Hodeir in one of his more playful moods. Doubt again.

Track 4. grmbl... grmbll... <_< I still have this. The trumpet sounds like Byrd, but that gets me nowhere. Reminds me of the Jazztet somehow.

Track 5. I've given up on finding out what this one is after running over to my collection a zillion times because of the previous track...

Track 6. The thing is: I have been playing this damn BFT so often, that I am convinced I have ALL the tracks somewhere in my collection. This one is definitely no exception.

As I posted before, the thing is that this way-cool-easy-going-why-don't-I-do-the-dishes-today kinda music is somehow really difficult when it comes to actually identifying it. And so you might as well throw

Track 7. in my direction. I ain't gonna solve it. Not today. I was hoping I could get rid of that "I know this, I know this" frantic thing and concentrate on the playing and try to solve it from there. No go, I've had one too many beers for that (and will have another one later on I think :g )

Track 8. ...

Track 9. If I remain the only one who go this one right, we might as well start an email exchange instead of a thread on this guy's music...

Track 10. pointing us to the tenor, should have helped of course. It didn't. It's probably because it's an unusual setting for this player to occur in, or at least where my knowledge is concerned.Track 11. Still like this one better. You have to LOVE the way the ensemble shouts go all gooey and glitch off the right path! It's because the nose is too big?

Track 11. 'nuf said huh!

Track 12. an' one more again. (HELLYEAH!)

Track 13. lovely.

Track 14. less so. Bit more Biscaya, but VERY enjoyable nonetheless. Cannot be wise, will remain curious.

Track 15. still no likee, skipped this one to make sure I have something to say about the following tracks. But first: let me get another beer!

Track 16. some telly theme? Still not very interesting I find. The tenor nags somewhere back there telling me "you know me! You know me!" Yeah well, quit playing in crappy environments then!

Track 17. :w I'll just pretend I didn?t hear this one as it has me thinking I should know it again (again? again!)

Track 18. still too short. Do you want us to guess that it's Slime, I mean Miles ;) playing here?

Track 19. I'm still tempted to opt for Sex Mob. I rather like this one. The greasy, fat blues lines, drip drip drip, definitely something to enjoy. It's all a bit overdone of course, but in a genuine fashion. Could remind one of Zappa in the approach.

Track 20. I clicked Mike's link. Should probably have recognised this...

edit: damn, that stupid text processor even chanced the triple dots into questionmarks!

Edited by couw

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Well, nobody knows nothing is not correct.

Track # 12 is the first piece from this CD, and I know that couw identified this, too. Sorry ubu, it's not Lucky T, wonder how you could take this entirely different sound for him. (So you had your appendix removed? Good to have you back!)

Uh, this is pretty embarassing! I have that disc, Mike, but did not listen to it a long time. I listened on cheap headphones and was still pretty high right after the operation when I took the notes I posted. No time so far to listen to the disc again, however I really did enjoy it, Vint!

ubu

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Wow, I feel like I'm late to the party, but I just finished listening through for the first time, so here goes...

Got my disc over the weekend, and will now spin it and take down some impressions as I listen...

1. My initial reaction to this (I have no idea what it is) is that it sounds like it could have been from a soundtrack, perhaps a spy thriller in an urban setting. As the piece develops, some of the unusual sounds that are incorporated make me a little less sure about that. Anyway, as a piece of music unto itself, it does very little for me... I find myself wanting to watch an old spy movie... :)

2. Wow- cool arrangement. This isn’t the type of thing I normally listen to, and I don’t think I’ve ever heard this, but it holds my interest a lot more than track 1 did. I’m not getting a real sense of a place and (or) time, either. It doesn’t strike me as definitively 60’s, or 70’s, etc. I find this refreshing, and it tells me that this is the sort of composing and arranging that will stand the test of time. Still wouldn’t say it’s my favorite type of music (I tend to prefer small groups), but this is pretty nice.

3. This is hitting me much in the same way as #2. I like this too, even if I’m not getting any real clues as to who and what this is. It reminds me a bit of some of the Mingus stuff I’ve heard. It occurs to me that this was very brief, as were the first two tracks. I actually would have liked to hear this stretched out a bit more... more from the alto player. I was just getting curious, and it was over! I’ll have to come back to this later.

4. This is tasty... that piano sounds familiar somehow... a Monk influence going on, but not quite Monkian enough to be Monk. I like all the elements of this, and this composition has a familar ring to it as well, but again I’m not really getting a strong sense of who this is. Not yet.... and #5 is starting up, so on I go...

5. Gerry Mulligan? CJB? I don’t own that, but that would be my guess. Ditto my last sentence on #2.

6. Wait a minute... here’s another one that reminds me of that spy movie feel. Very late night, roaming the empty streets, hip 50’s kind of feeling going on here. I haven’t a clue who this is, and maybe that’s because I was never much of a movie buff...

7. I love the opening, nice chords, and dig that unison line (something is reminding me of Oliver Nelson). Ah, another baritone sax. I like the sound of the vibes comping for the solos here. Great work by the bassist, and the drummer as well. Extremely well executed stuff. This may be my favorite track so far.

8. There it is AGAIN! Except this time it’s a little more laid back, a la The Pink Panther kind of sound. Again, this isn’t the type of music I sit down to listen to on the stereo, but I’ve heard quite a bit of it in film over the years, and I sometimes wonder why I don’t look for more recordings like this, because I do enjoy it. Wow, that one was brief, too. Kind of the opposite of the stretching out that was evident on Randy’s test!

9. This is a little different- very spare/sparse. Hmmm... whoa- it’s over! That’s getting a little TOO brief, IMO. It’s like filler. Anyway, I would have enjoyed more. No clue.

10. Another branch of the large ensemble tree where I am relatively ignorant. Tito Puente? Hmm, an english lyric. I don’t recognize the singer or the song. This one doesn’t do much for me, unfortunately. I appreciate the passion in the tenor solo, but overall it’s a little too loose for me.

11. I like this a little better than #10, but still not really my cup o’ tea. Very brief again.

12. This theme I recognize, but I’m not going to be able to call the name. I may even own this one... very nice midrange tenor tone (Mobleyesque in that sense, but.... ? no bells are going off). The piano solo strikes me as tenative, as if the player wasn’t really comfortable with this piece. There’s that theme again... I should know this... (and I have a feeling this is my one chance to avoid a complete goose egg! arg...)

13. Very interesting piece. I’m giving this one a second listen now, since my thoughts couldn’t keep up the first time through. First of all, what is that instrument that takes the first solo? At first I thought it was a harmonica, but now it sounds more like one of those (pardon the expression) “toys” that you blow into and has a little keyboard (with buttons too, like an accordion has?). Man, I’m struggling on this one. :) Anyway, it doesn’t sound like a toy in this player’s hands (just as a harmonica doesn’t sound like a toy in Toots’ hands). Very cool sound. I don’t know the alto player, and the salsa (?) rhythm passage only adds to the intimidation I feel in trying to guess who this might be. Nice piano work. I like the melody, as well as the overall structure of this. Really nice music.

14. The accordian is an instrument that I’ve come to appreciate more and more in recent years. I won’t go into why, but basically I just think it’s time for people to stop bashing it all the time (go ahead and bash polka music, but not the accordian ;)). This track has a very appealing sound to my ears. Not sure I’ve ever heard this particular instrumentation, with accordian, electric guitar and vibes. This works for me- very nice texture. Nice melody again. This track wasn’t as brief as some of the previous tracks, but again I would have liked to hear just a bit more stretching out (more from the guitarist would have been nice). I’m anxious to know more about this one!

15. I like the “feel” and the “mood” on this more than the actual composition and the solos. Relative to the previous tracks, this doesn’t quite draw me in as much. Still interesting and listenable, though.

16. Ditto my opening comment on #15. The overall mood is appealing to me, and in general this is highly listenable, but the “guts” (the writing and the execution) don’t really knock me out. Very pleasant, something I wouldn’t be quick to shut off, but probably not something I would rush out to buy. This one put me in the mind of a soundtrack sample right away.

17. My reaction is almost identical to #16, except that this one was too brief. In this respect, and in this context (music that reminds me of film soundtrack material), I’m reminded of some of the soundtracks I have had (or still have), where it was not unusual to see very short pieces (say, 1 minute in length) were interspersed with longer pieces. While the shorter pieces might be very nice, I almost always tend to forget about them more easily and more quickly... but I’m sure they have their role in the films in which they were used. They work better “In context” than they do on their own (although this disc as a whole is starting to take on a nice personality of its own!)

18. Is this Miles, Barney Wilen, et al, from Ascenseur Pour L'echafaud? Brief!

19. This one sounds familiar. A little less fitting with the “soundtrack” feel of the previous selections, although it certainly could have been used in a film. The tenor sounds much more familiar to me than the trumpet (which doesn’t sound familiar at all to me right now...). The chops and the playfulness remind me of Clark Terry somewhat.

20. I’m one who does go in for jazz vocalists more than most board members, but I’m also pretty picky about what I like. This tune is a nice swinger, but the vocalist comes up short for me. I have a feeling he’s not a fulltime singer (no law against that, but I’m just making the observation). Not terrible, but not quite together either. I don’t really have a very discerning ear for organists, but overall this track doesn’t strike me as being all that heavy duty (I don’t recognize the guitar player either, which doesn’t really surprise me, as there have been so many groups like this over the years). Nothing really outstanding on this track, for my taste... and I would say that this didn’t really fit too well with the most of the selections on the disc.

As I progressed through this CD, I began to realize that I am going to want to keep listening to this, think about some of the film music I have passed by (or allowed to pass me by), and pay close attention to the answers when they’re revealed. From time to time I’ve thought about investigating more soundtrack music (domestic as well as foreign, as I’ve seen quite a few interesting mini-essays at Dusty Groove!), and this disc could be a catalyst in that regard, whenever I reach a point where I’m ready to follow another new musical path.

MANY thanks to Vint for putting together this very interesting and tasty disc!

Now to go look and see if anybody was as clueless as I was. :)

==========

Edited for a couple of typos

Edited by Jim R

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Short nap, dammit..

At first I thought that this disc had a theme of "soundtrack jazz", and I'm still not certain that it doesn't but I don't think so. But to that end, some of this material seems to have come from contexts where the intent was to provide music that was "jazzy" rahter than to be "jazz", so I reacted accordingly. No sense in finding fault for something no being what it's not meant to be. And all the cuts COULD function in a soundtrack/score setting of some sort.

Certainly a different bunch of material than other BFTs to date, that's for sure!

OK, my guesses:

TRACK 1 - Pretty cool. Sounds like an old Alex North (or somebody like that) film theme sampled and remixed into a "Space Age Bachelor Pad meets Art Of Noise" kind of thing. This wouldn't be "The Man With The Golden Arm" theme, would it? Haven't seen that movie in decades, but it WOULD make for a good "wink and a nod" opener. Whoever/whatever, it is the contrabass clarinet towards the end works marvellously as texture.

TRACK 2 - Cool intro, reminds of that big band album Ray Brown did on Verve, nice tight, slightly dissonant voicings. Gets a little less interesting for me as the theme begins, loses me once the samba section takes over. But if this is an underscoring of a films main titles or something, that's a different matter. Plenty of little orchestration quirks along the way that bespeak skilled and clever writing. I just don't care for the theme and its handling in "jazz" terms. But as film music, well, that's something else. And I thought I might have heard Ronnie Cuber there towards the end.

TRACK 3 - Sounds British, whatever that means, and again, like a title sequence from a movie, this time a closing title. Johnny Dankworth or Johhny Spence perhaps? The alto soloist reminds me tonally of whoever it was who played on the closing theme to A HARD DAYS NIGHT, the big band version.

TRACK 4 - in spite of the "Pink Panther"-esque opening, it sure ain't Mancini! Tune is kinda like Monk with all the nightime removed. Altoist is kinda Woods-y in tone, but not as "inside" the music as Woods would/could have been. I like the trumpeter quite a bit - real personality, and he treats the material with the sincerely dignified whimsy that I think was intended. The only guy I've heard do this kind of "Monk By Daylight" material is Stan Tracey. I'm liking this one more with each listen.

TRACK 5 - Pretty sure I recognized Mulligan, and, maybe, Gene Quill. Less sure about Mulligan after the solo, though. Trombonist sounds VERY familiar. Trumpet solo is very nice too. Sounds like a Columbia recording. Nice, but too short!

TRACK 6 - again, sounds like "film jazz", and as such works nicely. But too short!

TRACK 7 - Sahib Shihab in a Francy Boland setting? Sounds familiar, I might have this one in my "listened to once or twice, need to come back to it again" pile. Or not - that pile is waaaayyyy too big. Anyway, this is some really good stuff!

TRACK 8 - back into filmland again (sorry whenever I hear alto flute, vibes, conga, and blue notes together, I go to the movies in my mind). Again, as a film cue, it works very nicely - evocative and colorful.

TRACK 9 - Benny Carter on one helluva drunk! :g No clue, but I like it, even if again, it's too short (unless, again, its a film cue).

TRACK 10 - Sounds like it begins in the middle of an already begun piece. Lyrics remind me of something from the Kid Creole/Coati Mundi school, but the singing and arranging doesn't. The "parts" of the arrangement are typically Latin, but how they're put together isn't, not always, which makes for some interesting tensions between expectations and gettings. And if that ain't the GREAT George Adams, then I need new speakers! Well, I need new speakers any way... Is this Kip Hanrahan? Never got around to checking him out, and I've been meaning to for YEARS. I'm liking this one becasue it's "wrong" in so many ways, but it's an intentional, knowing wrong, and because George Adams was a BAAAAAADDDDDD MUTHAFUKKAH!

TRACK 11 - "Thank you, ladies and gentlemen, we'll be right back after a short intermission..."

TRACK 12 - thanks to a few years of constant prodding by my online brothers, I think that I have finally gotten to the point where I can identify Barney Wilen. Tell me I'm right. This is damn good! Is it from the same disc as Dr. J's cut a few BFTs back. I bought that one, just haven't internalized it yet.

TRACK 13 - I think I have this. I think I've listened to it in the last month or so. It sounds DAMN familiar. But I can't call it. Mike Weil's Law, I guess. Sounds like a melodica, not an accordion, and the piano has that Van Gelder sound, so I SHOULD know what this is, but AAAARRRGH, I can't call it. WAIT A MINUTE, YES I CAN!!! Listened to it on a road trip last month. LAST CUT ON THIS DISC. Glad I'm not losing my mind!

TRACK 14 - Now THIS is accordion. But who or what, I don't have a clue. guitarist has a slight "country" flavor in his playing. Nice. Not my bag, but nice.

TRACK 15 - Sorta hints at "The End Of A Love Affair", but not enough to actually be it. More accordion! Who knew? This music is VERY "cinematic" in effect, even if that's not it's function. Tenor playing reminds me a lot of Trevor Lawrence on the "Trouble Man" soundtrack. Don't think that's Wayne, but it's close, and I'll probably kick myself when the altoist is revealed. He sounds REAL familiar. This is a most interesting cut that grows on me w/each listen, mainly due to its struturing - very fresh, very novel, and appealing as such.

TRACK 16 - Sorry, but more "movie jazz", it seems to me. Not a dis, just an observation. And again, it reminds me of the "Trouble Man" ST, which is not a bad thing at all. But that ain't what this is, obviously. Again, nice.

TRACK 17 - Angelo Baldamenti? Pretty intertesting layerings of different textures, and yet again, Trevor Lawrence-esque tenor. As "jazz", it's lacking for me, but as music for a specific purpose, I find this short, but full of interest.

TRACK 18 - I might be wrong, but the "clattering" sounds sound sampled from the intro of Mingus' "II B.S.". If not sampled, then somebody's playing the same thing, or damn close to it. A nice interlude, if nothing else.

TRACK 19 - And speaking of Mingus, these folks sure are! Might be a Jack Walrath band, but I can't identify anybody w/any certainty. I could ALMOST buy Zorn on alto, believe it or not. Interesting, loose, and fun.

TRACK 20 - I know two things: 1)that is DEFINITELY Eddie Harris on tenor, and 2)this is one of the hippest songs ever written! HAD to do some research on this one, it's TOO damn cool for me not to know NOW exactly what it was, and what I found was TRACK 7 FROM THIS. Confirmed HERE. HELL YEAH, I'M GETTING THIS!

Thanks. Vint. It was a long, often strange trip, but your selections forced me to listen differently than I usually do, and for that I'm thankful. I know I folded big time, as far as guessing goes, but that's life. It was fun, and I heard some new and different things. Can't beat that!

Contest ends at midnight! :g

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TRACK 13 - I think I have this. I think I've listened to it in the last month or so. It sounds DAMN familiar. But I can't call it. Mike Weil's Law, I guess. Sounds like a melodica, not an accordion, and the piano has that Van Gelder sound, so I SHOULD know what this is, but AAAARRRGH, I can't call it. WAIT A MINUTE, YES I CAN!!! Listened to it on a road trip last month. LAST CUT ON THIS DISC. Glad I'm not losing my mind!

Glad to hear we turned you on to Barney, Jim!

You're right, it is a melodica. I posted the link to the original album above. Howdya like the alto cat?

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TRACK 20 - I know two things: 1)that is DEFINITELY Eddie Harris on tenor, and 2)this is one of the hippest songs ever written! HAD to do some research on this one, it's TOO damn cool for me not to know NOW exactly what it was, and what I found was TRACK 7 FROM THIS. Confirmed HERE. HELL YEAH, I'M GETTING THIS!

Thanks for identifying that LP. I listened to it only once, many years ago.

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TRACK 20 - I know two things: 1)that is DEFINITELY Eddie Harris on tenor, and 2)this is one of the hippest songs ever written! HAD to do some research on this one, it's TOO damn cool for me not to know NOW exactly what it was, and what I found was TRACK 7 FROM THIS. Confirmed HERE. HELL YEAH, I'M GETTING THIS!

Thanks for identifying that LP. I listened to it only once, many years ago.

woa! cool beans!

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Man how you guys do it.

First off Jim to know that that piano is in Van Gelder's from #13 is beyond me. Mikeweil just kindly sent me a very concise and thorough discog of this band moments ago. Nice!!! Yeah that's a melodica played incredibly. So now what is after the solo? A descarga or a montuno?? I wish I knew all those little latin idiosyncrasis.

And then to know that Eddie Harris on #20 without all my great clues. :g

Regarding those speakers Jim? That squealier saxophonist has more albums under his own name than is countable and the other tenor has one of those names from the Black Forest. No not George Adams although some of his finest work is under many of the Kip Hanrahan produced bits and pieces. Beautiful what he and Don could do. But that vocalist should be easily recognizable if I say you're right on with #10.

#12 is so much talked about here and putting him in that Modern Jazz Quintet setting is probably the only reason it would toss you off. Most of you it didn't. (I did not do my homework as diligently as I should have as it was too late when I reviewed Dr. J's test. At least it's another cut.)

As for the Badalamenti your nap forced you to be a bit slow with the posted guess I guess.

After having listened to this comp a bit more I think I'm defintiely getting bored with what happened between tracks 16 and 19. Oh well that stream of conciousness is alarming (or not) when it is set in digits.

*But now you can all concentrate on track #15: not a cinema track per se and there are two tenors, a soprano and an alto, each taking subsequent solos. Thing is that you have discussed some of these on past BFTs. The tune is written by someone who is less recognized as a tenor soloist and more so in the same parallel function in a way to the leader of track #2. In fact the cat each of these two oversaw is possibly their main reason for being. :ph34r:

Edited by Man with the Golden Arm

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I was about to start reading this thread, and the word "melodica" came into my head. So, my compulsion for Googling kicked in immediately, and here's a couple examples of the family if toys- er, instruments ;) - that I was thinking about for track 13:

melodica.gif

Maybe this has already been discussed. NOW I'm going to read this thread and try to catch up!!

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Hey, JimR what's with that hose on that melodica? Ouch, but sounds nice and cleansing, no? Makes me wonder whether old "Saxophone___V..." ever got his disc?

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TRACK 1 - This wouldn't be "The Man With The Golden Arm" theme, would it?

D'OH!!!!

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So that's Murray instead of Adams, eh? Well Ok, Murray should always play so controlled and focused! But you say there's two tenors? Didn't pick up on that while folding the laundry yesterday. Serves me right.

There's a few things in this life I can identify immediately, not many, but a few, and among them are Eddie Harris' tenor sound and Rudy Van Gelder's piano sound. There's nothing in the world remotely like either!

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And where's the other 5 seconds of #20? :g

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And where's the other 5 seconds of #20?  :g

I don't know. What do you mean?...I'm getting Weizen to ring up Haldeman right now!

I do think that the contest ends at 11:59:55.

Edited by Man with the Golden Arm

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N'OH! That stuff swings. This one swings a meat cleaver. Can I post the cover at least?

artwerk by the pizz!

the best part of the artwerk: "The LP release did not include any sort of insert."

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Hey, JimR what's with that hose on that melodica?

Beats the hell outta me. My Google search actually turned up quite a variety of gadgets (some with hoses, some without) that apparently all qualify as "melodicas". Anyway, I guess I'm like you- when it comes to melodicas, I'm "old school" (no hosin' around). :g

melodica-hohner-alto+soprano1959.jpg

THAT'S what I'm talkin' about! 1959 melodica jammin', baby! B)

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my niece's melodica came with a hose too. I've always wondered why. Has anyone ever see anyone perform melodica with a hose? (stupid question I know...)

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Jack DeJohnette plays a mean melodica.

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Jack DeJohnette plays a mean melodica.

with a hose?

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Don't think so.

Not sure if the hose was for sanitary purposes, or if some models came with that so you could hold it in front of you like a regular keyboard (perfect for the anal types who can't FUNCTION unless everything is "just so"), or if you could use it to get a Vocoder-like effect, not unlike what a harmonica player does by varying the size and shape of his/her oral cavity. I just don't know.

I know a local cat who plays accordion AND melodica (in addition to regular keyboards/piano) in this wacked out Brazillian band he has, and I think the instruments make for an appealing and appropriate texture. "Peasant Cool", I guess you could call it. But this cat could play Tinker Toys and make'em sound good, so I guess that proves nothing.

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Some more elaborate comments are in order.

# 1: DJ Big Sound meets Maynard Ferguson? This is nicely done, the percussion loops are longer and reveal much greater rhythmical knowledge than usual. I probably wouldn't buy this, but I like it. Wonder who it is.

# 2: I sure can understand why Jim thought of the Ray Brown big band, but this doesn't sound like Ray, and the turn to Latin rhythm excludes this, I think. It is the often found weird mixup of Brazilian and Cuban rhythm patterns and instruments that authentic bands wouldn't do, at least not this way. But as a big band track, nicely done and full of good spirits.

# 3: Crime time! The conga player turns the tumbao around after 0:45 into the track, and conga and bongo are not really together, so this probably is older stuff from the 1960's.

# 4: We're probably wrong when we drop any of the familiar names. Nice alto. Trumpet dtto. (sounds familiar) and piano a little monkish, like him. Something tells me this might be quite a surprise when it is revealed. Drummer resembles some things Donald Bailey did, but I'd rather say it's not him. All are very competent players.

# 5: Of course we think of Mulligan when we hear a pianoless ensemble with a pedestrian beat like this, but the bari does not sound like Mulligan to me, sounds a little too big, and solo is much too short - Gerry never would have confined himself to so short a chorus. It's not Shihab with Boland, their groove and Francy's writing were different. Again, very nice.

# 6: Plas Johnson on tenor? Very big bass drum sound. Nice arrangement. Good use of lower reeds and brass. Humor and competence. Chino Valdez playing congas? Hollywood, that's for sure.

# 7: More familiar sounds, late 1960's, could be I have heard this before, but no, that bari does not sound familiar. Vibist is nice, too. All are good players, good swing. Curious who this is.

# 8. More film sound tracks ... Good use of the alto flute. But the rhythm section is a little too loose for my taste, not really together.

# 9: Sure this is a Brazilian pandeiro player starting the track. This leaves me wanting more. A very personal saxophone conception.

# 10: I have heard this before, but maybe with a different singer. Somehow I think of Jack Bruce's voice when I hear this .... yes, track 2 on this CD is the original version.

# 11: More montuno for you, montuno for me. The brass cowbell sound and natural skin timbales place this in the 1960's. Another Hollywood recording, again too short.

# 12: see my previous post.

# 13: dtto.

# 14: Accordion, but no idea, nice blend with vibes and guitar. Did Shearing ever play such a machine?

# 15: Sounds like a clone half Getz, half Klemmer. Shorter's alter ego playing soprano. Phil Woods' alter ego on alto. Now will the real players please stand up? They sure are serious about their sentiments and get them across to me. Excellent choice.

# 16. Another deep sea diver, electric vibes - or a keyboard with vibes settings? - again faint echos of long forgotten tangos. Very emotional.

# 17: More moody string keyboard sounds, almost like a Samuel Barber piece. But soon we're taken back into the reality of a Hollywood studio. Still, a deep performance.

# 18: This could be the same percussionist playing on the original Decca single of Peggy Lee's "Fever" - I always wanted to know who this is. Damn, I've hardly written this and it's over - part of a suite or more film music?

# 19: Almost like a theme from the Booker Little - Eric Dolphy Five Spot sessions. But, no idea. Again, wonder who this is.

# 20: Wonder who? Eddie Who!!!

Great segues from one track to another. A very competent insight into the world of mood music. Well, this could be the theme, and it could be that there always is one musician on a track that has a connection to or appears on a previous track.

Thanks a lot!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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