Utevsky

Do you listen to jazz on the radio?

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What do you Organissimo posters think about jazz on the radio? As a radio programmer, I get very little feedback from listeners.* In this age of downloading, streaming and so on, there are so many different ways to hear jazz. I wonder to what extent serious jazz lovers still listen to jazz on the radio, why you listen, and what you like and dislike.

If you’re willing to share your thoughts, here are some questions for you:

Do you listen to jazz on the radio? If so, when and where do you listen? At home, in your vehicle, late at night? Broadcast radio or Internet stations?

How do you find out about the music that interests you – Down Beat, Pandora, Spotify, web forums like this one? Does radio play a part by exposing you to new sounds?

If you tune in, what music do you most like to hear? What music turns you off?

New releases – other things you haven’t heard before – familiar pieces?

A particular genre, e.g. bebop, hard bop, mainstream, avant garde – or a combination of them?

What do you like or dislike in a program host? How much info should the host provide about the recordings? Do you like to hear more talk, or as little as possible?

* I seek your general comments, not feedback about my show on KBCS-FM, which is only one of many “out there.”

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I used to listen to a lot of jazz in my early years (post-1975 and onwards quite a bit into the 80s), both programs on more historical jazz styles, new releases by new and older artists, and even lots of collectors' programs diving deep into 78s. I learnt about a lot of musicians, recordings and styles (up to noting down whatever tunes and artists struck my fancy in notebooks, some of them coming in useful for later purchases or searches, though I almost all of the time failed to note down such key info as the EXACT recording dates (beyond the year) or key personnel. I also recorded a lot onto cassette tape and still play some of them in my cars every now and then (wobbly or not ... ;)).

But in more recent times or now? IF ONLY there were many jazz radio programs of substance left, at least there are none to speak of on the FM radio stations that can be easily listened to here (I sometimes tune in to web radio, but not that often). Some late-night token programs that have remained seem to be more or less a medium of boosting upcoming or recently-completed festivals, even if the lineup is a full crossover into pop.

Cannot recall having heard (or heard of) any regular FM radio programs such as the Night Life program (by Ghost) that I listen to via web radio from time to time with great interest. They USED to exist but that was a long time ago ... And what there still is that tries to present jazz that way on public radio today seems to me (on those relatively few occasions that I listened in) to be geared strictly to jazz newbies.

One of the few remaining outlets where something for the actual jazz niche audiences might exist here are local "alternative" stations that you can either listen to in a very local FM area or via web radio. Interesting stuff there but since this is VERY "alternative" radio those who do the programs often clearly are more enthusiasts than radio pros. The programming is intriguing and broadens up horizons but the hosts are often not up to snuff, with some of them being just plain clueless. They love the music but don't have the background or knowledge to get the info about the music and musicians across with substance and, above all, authority and credibility. They could take a lesson from Ghost of Miles (sorry, David, admittedly I have not tuned in to your program yet).

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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No, I almost never do and then only if there is a specific concert that I hear about (usually from here).

As someone who knows what he likes, I prefer to put a CD on when and if I feel like listening to something. General background radio music has never really been my thing, it's too hit and miss.

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I never listen to jazz on the radio. Both our cars have SiriusXM, but I don't even listen to the jazz stations there. With the availability of iPods in the car, I much prefer listening to my own tastes. I think I got turned off to jazz radio with the advent of latin jazz, which became huge on NY jazz radio in the '80's. I don't much care for latin jazz, and it felt like I was being forced fed it.

"How do you find out about the music that interests you" - actually, mostly from this board, where knowledgeable enthusiasts discuss the music with depth and passion. I sometimes wish there was more discussion of current musicians; I sometimes feel that with every new thread about Coltrane or Miles, there's another currently working musician not putting food in their mouths or having to work at a day job. But I suppose I'm guilty of that as well; there's only so many hours in the day. The other issue with new artists is that many are not interesting composers. That used to not be a problem: we didn't need Ben Webster to be a great composer because what he played was wonderful enough. While we don't want current musicians to keep playing "Caravan," a lot of their own compositions aren't that interesting. Again, I don't have a solution.

There are two aspects that could entice me to listen to a jazz radio show: the personality of the host, and their curatorial talents. An engaging, interesting person (and not a contrived personality concocted for the radio) can be the fabric that holds the whole show together, and makes you want to listen until the music resumes. The music more and more needs good curators or editors. Cut out the dross; play me the wonderful stuff. If a DJ did this, and played mostly current artists, I might be intrigued enough to tune in. (Assuming I'm aware of the show; don't overlook some sort of promotional campaign as an ongoing necessity.)

Oh, one more thing: avoid politics on the show, even political asides. There's a snide conviction, especially in public radio, that all "correct" listeners share the same political views, and those with other views must be sneered at. Nothing's a quicker turn-off, and a huge reducer of the potential audience.

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I listen about seven hours a day. More when I'm in a car; fewer when I'm on a plane. I'm always listening from when I get up (2:00AM) until work begins.

I only listen to terrestrial radio, including BCS. (I studied at UW.) Since jazz (or creative music) radio isn't ubiquitous, I listen a lot through TuneIn application and website. I don't listen to the packaged programming, JazzRadio and such.

Downloads and streaming are great for people who never want to be surprised. (I say that tongue-in-cheek, but you know what I mean.) Pandora (full-disclosure: I worked with them, back in the Genome days) doesn't appeal to me. To carry my analogy of "surprise" forward, Pandora is for people who want to be surprised that unknown Person Y sounds a lot like old-favorite Person X. I'm being a little unfair, but I'd rather find myself stopping what I'm doing and listening intently when one song ends and I'm waiting for the next one to begin. Surprise!

In terms of content, I dislike vocals; breathless white chicks most of all. But that's just me. Other than that, I listen to the entirety of jazz. As alluded to above, I'd rather hear something new, surprising, challenging, ear-opening. Hearing Joe Henderson play Inner Urge for the 5 millionth time in my (long) lifetime doesn't do much for me. It's on my MP3 player, if I want it.

Recently, KCSM, San Mateo, CA replaced Big Band Jump, hosted by Don Kennedy, with Breakfast Dance and Barbeque with Clint Baker. God bless Don Kennedy for what he did, but the change was a delight. I'm not sure Kennedy ever played anything I hadn't heard before - I probably even played the same arrangement. Baker plays forgotten, ear-opening, interesting, educational stuff...without going beyond the early 50's, style-wise.

To me, a good DJ (1) provides complete personnel, not just leader name, (2) plays sets of (generally) 20+ minutes, (3) mixes it up, with three-minute and 25-minute songs, which feels like busting-out of radio format, (4) throws in a little color commentary from experience or historical tidbit, not just hyping some other album or selling something.

Good luck and keep up the good fight.

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Hi David,

I'll try to answer some of your questions from the perspective of (1) a programmer/presenter of a weekly show for almost 28 years on a non-commercial, all volunteer, station and (2) a radio listener. My "thing" as a presenter is, and always has been, themed programs. In the early years, the focus was usually on individual artists but this evolved due, in part, to digital rights management restrictions. In the last few years, the show has presented music recorded (in past years) on the date that the program airs. It keeps things interesting for me (and, I hope, for the listener), provides a themed structure, and allows for a wide variety of music. It takes a fair amount of time to find, preview, and select the music to air, and I only wish that I had more time available to play music, since the show is only 90 minutes.

With all sorts of outlets available (Pandora, Sirius, etc.), I sometimes marvel that people listen to radio at all, but thankfully some do. My experience is that, with a few exceptions, you don't get a lot of feedback from listeners. If you have something good to give away, the phones will ring, but, otherwise, most people either aren't motivated to call or don't want to disturb you during the program. There are the occasional folks calling up with questions about what was played or providing thanks for having played something. The exceptions are a small number of fairly regular listeners who call to pass along priceless stories (for example, having seen someone perform years ago, having played with so and so, or even having been in jail with someone, etc.) or just check in to say hello. You can form real ongoing (albeit "remote") relationships or connections with people this way. You don't get that from a streaming service. Most affirming in terms of feedback in some respects are those who will actually send in money to the station during our once a year fundraiser.

Regarding the issue of how much information to pass along, this can be a delicate balance. My view is that the music is the primary focus. Ultimately, the show is about the music, not about the presenter. However, I try to provide enough information to help the interested listener learn something along the way and to help put the music into some context without, I hope, getting overly pedantic. In addition to the usual leader and tune, I provide composers, recording date and location, original label, and, when possible, identify soloists via back announcing. I'll also pass along occasional anecdotes or personal observations. Much of the discographical information is also made available in real time via an on-line playlist which is also archived.

I mostly listen to music on the radio while driving or occasionally at home from the web. I tend to listen to programs by colleagues from whom I can learn something. Otherwise, I have a collection at home that I can enjoy, explore, and revisit. I try to keep current with new music or discover older music via other radio programs and by reading posts here.

I dislike shows that, perhaps under the direction of radio consultants, provide too little information. I really do want to know the soloists, not just the leader. I'm turned off by shows that are too formulaic or clearly based on a predetermined "playlist" or "rotation" selected by someone else. You know the shows. There's a vocal (usually a tune you've heard hundreds of times already like "My Funny Valentine", "Gee Baby, Ain't I Good to You", etc.) every third tune, and little information is provided about the music. These shows essentially provide "background music." in my mind, that's demeaning to the listener and does a disservice to the music.

I continue to do the program to help share my passion for the music with others, to expose people to music that they might not hear elsewhere or otherwise, and to help pass along what I learned from others. Listening to jazz radio in my formative years was one of the ways that I learned. When I started to listen and collect, much less music was as readily available compared to today, and jazz radio was one of the few ways to hear music that was not otherwise available. I guess I'm trying to pay back that debt and help ensure that younger people may actually be exposed to musicians who otherwise tend to fall through the cracks.

Jon Pollack

host of "The Jazz Train"

Tuesdays, 4-5:30 pm, eastern standard time (2100-2230 GMT)

WMBR-FM, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

88.1 fm with streaming and some archives at http://www.wmbr.org/

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Recently, KCSM, San Mateo, CA replaced Big Band Jump, hosted by Don Kennedy, with Breakfast Dance and Barbeque with Clint Baker. God bless Don Kennedy for what he did, but the change was a delight. I'm not sure Kennedy ever played anything I hadn't heard before - I probably even played the same arrangement. Baker plays forgotten, ear-opening, interesting, educational stuff...without going beyond the early 50's, style-wise.

:g Ha, sounds very much like the FINCH BANDWAGON I used to listen to on AFN on Sundays here in my early collecting years in the second half of the 70s. How much (or how often) Jack Teagarden, Lawson-Haggart, "The World's Greatest Jazz Band" etc. and other "middle-ground" bands and artists do you need? Sure, he exposed me to Big T and Lawson-Haggart first, but even to a youngster interested in jazz from that period this "play it safe" programming can become repetitive pretty soon if you keep your ears open and soak in everything you hear everywhere.

I tend to agree with your DJ commentaries, though providing complete personnel for a small combo might be feasible but not for a big band program, and a 25-minute track on the radio might be VERY hard to fit into ANY format. Though it CAN be rewarding ... I remember a Dexter Gordon feature radio show I caught in the early 80s, and it had a lengthy killer jam session tune from the war years also including Duke Ellington and Ben Webster (and a CRAZY Stuff Smith). Somehow that jam tune never left the back of my mind but it took me well over 10 years to get the recording until I finally came across a copy of the Ben Webster "Ben and the Boys" LP (Jazz Archives JA-35) where the tunes and the line-up read like this might be IT at last - and it was ... a lengthy version of "Honeysuckle Rose" that starts in the middle of the proceedings! :D

@jazztrain: Very interesting post summing up both sides as well as some pitfalls - thanks!

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Big Beat Steve,

To put the tune length issue into some perspective, today is the 50th anniversary of the recording of "A Love Supreme." I've aired it in its entirety before (perhaps on some other significant anniversary), but it just won't fit today. I suspect others will be airing it today anyway.

I agree with you regarding the personnel of big bands. I generally don't read the full personnel but will try to identify soloists. I always laugh when I hear someone referring to a recording "featuring" followed by the full personnel of a band or, even worse, everyone listed on the cover of a compilation album.

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I don't listen to the radio except when it's playing for my father (I spend about twelve hours a day most days taking care of him). And then it's the excellent listener supported classical station. So, no I don't listen to jazz on the radio. I have thousands of cds to listen to instead, and some records.

At the end of the 'seventies I just got so tired of djs talking, especially those tag team talking characters, that I just got as far away from radios as I could. If I had to suffer through a radio in the workplace I did as well as I could. This move away from radio listening coincided with my growing interest in jazz, so jazz has not really ever been radio content for me. My best friend had an hour a week on the radio and played mostly jazz, and I would try to listen to that when I could, but even that was hard as my wife generally had other plans for that hour. . . .

Edited by jazzbo

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KMHD here in Portland, OR sporadically - I know some DJs and it can be good, but it can be very uneven too.

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I tried to listen to jazz in the car this evening. It was tough sledding, either a bunch of new stuff that sounded tired or old stuff that reminded me how tired I was. Some Orrin Evans cut with JD Allen so far up Wayne's ass it's a miracle that Wayne hasn't had to go to the ER get the impaction removed. I mean, really, why the hell do I want to hear that? Why does anybody want to here that?

Apparently some folks do, so maybe I am not the intended audience. In a way, I really hope that I'm not.

Pandora was working good for me for a while, but wen your Gil Evans Channel takes you to Wes Montgomery and Art Blakey in, like 5 songs, I'm like oh...ok, it's like that, is it. I see. The same thing happens on my Duke Ellington station. And my AEC station seems to have a frighteningly shallow catalog, as does my Morton Feldman station. Don't even ask about my Astrud Gilberto station, because why do French cafe-sounding songs always turn up there once I start to fall asleep? Who is trying to sell me what and why?

Podcasts, mostly now, or Live 360 stations )no announcers, but the good stations hover an enless variety - and if you ask, they will send you track/album info, instatnly sent emails, I can take it from there, thanks, but what I need to really hold my interest is simple enough - either new music or old music out of some forgotten corner of total badassness, and somebody who really knows what they're talking about. I dig enthusiasm, but only as a by-product of knowledge, not as a substitute for or a diversion away from it.

And truthfully, I really don't give a damn about "jazz" anymore as a style of music to be defended, championed, presented, etc. That kind of Devotion To A Word is letting all kinds of lackluster shit get all kinds of sunshine (hello JD Allen so far up Wayne's ass he's about to come out his throat, please stop that, PLEASE stop that), and frankly, it makes me cranky. I don't need any help being cranky, ya' know, I do fine all by myself. Mix it up, surprise me. Trane and Bird were digging Bartok & Varese, cool. Play me some Bartok, play me some Trane. play me some Varese and play me some Bird. I can handle the truth. Play me some Ray Charles and some Hank Snow, take me there, it's ok. Lou Donaldson, Meters. None of this stuff happened in a vacuum, let's not present it like it did, or does. Truth, not propaganda. No "narratives", please. "Narratives" are always post-realtime, narratives always come through a filter. Real time ain't got time to be filtered. Perspective, yes, because real time demands a perspective in order to survive. But perspective is not narrative and perspective is not filter. Perspective is about surviving, narrative and filter are about claiming victory. Hell, if you won, there would be no need for narrative and filter.

Nobody wins, that's the moral of the story, some people just survive more strongly than others, and not always in ways you might expect, Herbie Nichols, never winning but sure as hell surviving with a steady stealth vigor. Think about that, survival is better than victory, victory is for losers on a lucky streak, that's all. Music as active human behavior, choices being made/not made (business as well as musical), life in action through sound, that's so much more interesting than just "music", so much more interesting.

Play the Buster Smith Atlantic side in its entirety and then say.............WHOA! And then say good night. Remember Ray Scott calling NFL games? That, when appropriate. Not always, but when.

Make me feel like a dumbass for not listening, that's what I want.

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Great announcers in the DC area over the years. Rusty Hassan, Rob Bamberger, Larry Applelbaum, etc. I love when Dick Spottswood dips into jazz on his shows!

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Not since the early late 80s/early 90s.

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I do sometimes like the surprise element of radio. The word "passive" generally has a negative connotation, but I think that the "passive listening" experience you get from radio - i.e., hearing only what the DJ wants you to hear - can allow for some surprises, juxtapositions that never would occur to you, and the chance to hear something that you would never buy or choose to put on.

I like the idea that someone can turn on a radio and hear jazz, but by now, those same listeners already know how to seek out the music inexpensively from other sources.

It will be interesting to see what happens to radio in the next, say, 25 or 30 years. With corporate giants like Disney abandoning the medium, I wonder if it might not revert back to all local programming, free of Clear Channel.

Edited by Teasing the Korean

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I listen to Sirius XM or WKCR when I'm driving. Otherwise, normally not.

I find out about new music here.

I'm not a big avant garde fan so if that comes on, I will probably turn it off.

More partial to bebop, hardbop and soul jazz.

On Sirius XM, the hosts are ok. On WKCR, Phil Schaap can wear on you but normally I won't change the dial because of the host. I tune in for the music.

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I tried to listen to jazz in the car this evening. It was tough sledding, either a bunch of new stuff that sounded tired or old stuff that reminded me how tired I was. Some Orrin Evans cut with JD Allen so far up Wayne's ass it's a miracle that Wayne hasn't had to go to the ER get the impaction removed. I mean, really, why the hell do I want to hear that? Why does anybody want to here that?

Because it sounds good? I respect your opinions, Jsngry, and agree with many of them, but I enjoy listening to Orrin Evans and JD Allen. To each his own!

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I've always had a problem with stations and DJ's that don't announce what they're playing. Some stations now show what's being played on your dial or whatever you call the window in your radio and I often grab my phone to use Shazam. Then when some announcers do talk they ramble on and on. I'm not talking about just jazz stations or programs.

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I tried to listen to jazz in the car this evening. It was tough sledding, either a bunch of new stuff that sounded tired or old stuff that reminded me how tired I was. Some Orrin Evans cut with JD Allen so far up Wayne's ass it's a miracle that Wayne hasn't had to go to the ER get the impaction removed. I mean, really, why the hell do I want to hear that? Why does anybody want to here that?

Because it sounds good? I respect your opinions, Jsngry, and agree with many of them, but I enjoy listening to Orrin Evans and JD Allen. To each his own!

Exactly. somebody thinks it sounds good, and if they do, then they should pursue it, of course. It doesn't sound good to me, that's all, it sounds like a necrophiliac invasion of a still living being. I don't even like movies about stuff like that, much less a real-life documentary of it!

To the point of your survey, though, this type of thing is 100% guaranteed not what I will listen to on an ongoing basis. The only reason I listened to it for as long as I did was because I was closer to my destination than away from it.

Then again, like I said, you might not be looking for me as a listener. I can respect that, certainly understand that, and wish you well in your search for more of those whom you do seek.

My ideal radio musical show would be to get somebody like Chuck Nessa, Larry Kart, Moms Mobley, Magnificent Goldberg, Jeff Crompton, Steve Reynolds, Leeway, any of these folks with deep knowledge and an informed passion/perspective/opinion to match of something/anything/everything, give them disposal to a bajillion gigaquantibytes of musical data, put them in front of an open mike with the recreational imbibement of their choice, and let them start riffing on the music that's on their mind at the moment, and let them keep riffing on it. If there's a need for a radio pro to be an enabler/instigator, so be it, but let the rolling out of the conversation drive the programming, let the programming be as improvisational as the music itself. Present something that brings all the enlightenment and fun-ness of the best discussions here and put it on the air, with cats having the ability to pull up whatever and say, ok, this is what I'm talking about, or, then again, you have this to consider, something like that. I would so be tuning in to hear that on a regular basis.

You might be able to tell that I grew up at the tail end of free-form radio, and also had the ability to drive over to the local NPR station with an armful of records because the DJ on that shift was a playing buddy of mine who would let stuff like that go on as long as it made for good radio. Of course, free-from radio is pretty much dead, and my buddy got moved over to doing news/traffic bumpers when the NPR station went to all newstalktalknews (and would have moved out long before that if anybody in management would have been listening to improvised on-the-spot live reporter updates about the loose hubcap that wouldn't stop rolling - would not stop rolling - all over Dallas, until at last it rolled into the life-stopping force of William Murchison's mind, or the interview of Muhammad Ali campaigning for Ross Perot while Art Blakey looped away in the background), but oh well, NPR doesn't want me for an audience either. I, otoh, love a good radio program.

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I do sometimes like the surprise element of radio. The word "passive" generally has a negative connotation, but I think that the "passive listening" experience you get from radio - i.e., hearing only what the DJ wants you to hear - can allow for some surprises, juxtapositions that never would occur to you, and the chance to hear something that you would never buy or choose to put on.

I like the idea that someone can turn on a radio and hear jazz, but by now, those same listeners already know how to seek out the music inexpensively from other sources.

It will be interesting to see what happens to radio in the next, say, 25 or 30 years. With corporate giants like Disney abandoning the medium, I wonder if it might not revert back to all local programming, free of Clear Channel.

Certainly, surprises can be delightful, if you can find a program curated by someone whose tastes are congruent, or at least do not clash, with your own. My hope is that even an experienced listener can be turned on to unfamiliar artists and recordings via radio. Programming based on someone's personal tastes is more likely to do that turning on than programming dictated by some corporate playlist. -- I hope you're right about a resurgence in local radio programming. It is mostly the little public and college stations that give their programmers freedom to play whatever they want.

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You might be able to tell that I grew up at the tail end of free-form radio, and also had the ability to drive over to the local NPR station with an armful of records because the DJ on that shift was a playing buddy of mine who would let stuff like that go on as long as it made for good radio. Of course, free-from radio is pretty much dead, and my buddy got moved over to doing news/traffic bumpers when the NPR station went to all newstalk (and would have moved out long before that if anybody in management would have been listening to improvised on-the-spot live reporter updates about the loose hubcap that wouldn't stop rolling - would not stop rolling - all over Dallas, until at last it rolled into the life-stopping force of William Murchison's mind, or the interview of Muhammad Ali campaigning for Ross Perot while Art Blakey looped away in the background), but oh well, NPR doesn't want me for an audience either. I, otoh, love a good radio program.

I spent some time at Seattle's "free-form" radio station, KRAB, in the 1970s and I loved it. You're right of course that stations like that no longer exist, at least in the broadcast media. But there are still places where a DJ has full discretion in selecting the music. To me that is the most important kind of freedom, even if there are some underwriting announcements to read and so forth.

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It is mostly the little public and college stations that give their programmers freedom to play whatever they want.

When it comes to jazz, larger public (NPR) radio stations don't have any freedom. I think they are expected to play new releases and to "keep jazz alive" through your tax-deductible contribution. If you got a DJ gig at an NPR station and played nothing but classic Prestige and Blue Note LPs, you'd be fired before your first week was out.

I agree that non-NPR college stations and smaller community radio stations can play whatever they want, but not the larger NPR public stations.

I should add that JSngry's comments above generally reflect where I am.

Edited by Teasing the Korean

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Certainly, surprises can be delightful, if you can find a program curated by someone whose tastes are congruent, or at least do not clash, with your own. My hope is that even an experienced listener can be turned on to unfamiliar artists and recordings via radio. Programming based on someone's personal tastes is more likely to do that turning on than programming dictated by some corporate playlist. -- I hope you're right about a resurgence in local radio programming. It is mostly the little public and college stations that give their programmers freedom to play whatever they want.

I do sometimes like the surprise element of radio. The word "passive" generally has a negative connotation, but I think that the "passive listening" experience you get from radio - i.e., hearing only what the DJ wants you to hear - can allow for some surprises, juxtapositions that never would occur to you, and the chance to hear something that you would never buy or choose to put on.

I like the idea that someone can turn on a radio and hear jazz, but by now, those same listeners already know how to seek out the music inexpensively from other sources.

I listen to the radio - and I'm speaking of all radio, not just jazz here - seeking some degree of clash. For me, an old man, I'm always checking out college (and high school) radio.

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Nessa came on Jazz From Blue Lake in the 1980's and shared some of his considerable Blue Note lp library with us. Today, he dropped by to be interviewed by the BBC about "A Love Supreme." Tonight, late, we'll play an 18 minute piece from his phenomenal Bobby Bradford album recorded in March. That has Ingebracht Haker Flaten playing bass, who appeared at Edge Fest in Ann Arbor this October. Last week a trio of Norwegien improvisers called Ballrogg -- bass, clarinets and slide guitar, more or less, and not about Tolkein, it's a variation on Norwegian's prononounciation of Roger...you'll have to tune in -- came by the station and recorded a live performance that will air next week. The day before this incredible singer/pianist Jesus freak named Ashely Gonzalez Daneman came in with a quartet and recorded an hour of her "Beauty Indestructable" original music with trumpet, electric bass and drums (20 and 30 something's) which airs Saturday morning at about 8:45, and includes a ball your eyes out improvisation on "Silent Night" (really, I have to say something in front of God and everyone after that?). And Sunday night from 7 to 10 I just put together a three hour program on the music of Peggy Lee featuring 15 edited talk parts with Lee biographer James Gavin. So, thats part of a week on the radio, especially for our local audience, our primary audience. Tonight we'll celebrate McCoy Tyner's birthday in the first 20 minutes of each hour, but feeling fuzzy on it as he played the Gilmore Keyboard Festival in Kalamazoo and St. Cecilia Music Center in Grand Rapids within the past two years and we went way, way into his thing....tonight's going to be a ramble...starts at 10, goes to 3 a.m. And if it works will be available on our web site during the day tomorrow. So,yes, I love playing jazz on the radio...

Edited by Lazaro Vega

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WBLV is on TuneIn Radio, I have it on Roku and on my phone. Are those real-time broadcasts or podcasts? I can't ever tell, really...try to hit your show but haven't had the luck yet. But yes, that's the kind of jazz radio I could sit down and pass some time with. Not jsut records, whcih you can hear anywhere once you know about them, but live-ness on the air, real time radio, yeah.

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