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Michael Weiss

Blue Mitchell with John Mayall

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I saw a version of this band a couple of years later (I guess) with Blue and Red Holloway. They looked like they were having fun.

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He's on at least three Mayall records from the early 70s, (Jazz Blues Fusion, Movin' On, and Ten Years are Gone).

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Jazz Blues Fusion is a good album. They're probably all worth getting.

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Saw Blue with John in Chicago, which was taped for a TV concert show. Way back when when I was 19 or so. Memories. Ohio Players were also on their own stage. And my late wife was there too (with someone else). I remember the music as being very good.

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Glad that Blue Mitchell made some $ with the gigs and recordings. As for Mayall. I'll pass.

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A nice Blue Mitchell record from the period (1972) featuring John Mayall on harp, Freddie Robinson and Others....

it's Worth listening to it if you like "Jazz Blues Fusion"...

Blue-Mitchell-Blues-Blues-504540.jpg

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This Blue Mitchell era is actually the John Mayall period which I like least. To me, Mayall himself is all right as a complement to strong players. Mayall is an O.K. vocalist, harmonica player and keyboard player. Also, I think Mayall does much better when he sticks to 1950s style Chicago blues, To me, his jazzier explorations are not nearly as interesting or successful.

Personally I like his early small group blues albums with the British blues guitarists: Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton, A Hard Road (with Peter Green)--the 2 CD Deluxe edition is far better than the single disc in my opinion, and Crusade, with Mick Taylor. He got those guitarists when they were young and hungry and playing their hearts out to try to make it. I find those albums to be quite successful. I also like his 1980s and 1990s albums with different guitarists featured, such as Walter Trout and Coco Montoya. He had a real resurgence in that period. I saw him live with Coco Montoya and it was an exciting blues concert.

As for Blue Mitchell, I recall an interview with him in which he said something to the effect that when he first got off a plane with the Mayall band, he wondered who all the people were, who were standing there waiting to greet the plane.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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I like how on the back of the old records he'd have what key each song was in, stressed very strongly as part of the art design. What that was all about, I don't know, if I need to know they key, I can get that, and if I don't, then...what, exactly?

But it was one of those "so goofy it's charming" type things. Blues in E

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from Down Beat, May 20, 1976 -- Blue Mitchell on touring with John Mayall:

"I've never seen them (Basie and Ellington) get the kind of receptions we used to get. When we were abroad in Australia or New Zealand, there would be receptions at the airports, and press conferences in rooms filled with cameras and floodlights. I must say John (Mayall) wasn't a selfish man, because when they started asking him too many questions he'd say, "Talk to some of my men; you've got Blue Mitchell here and Clifford Solomon, they're well-known musicians."

on first meeting Mayall:

"I'd never heard of John Mayall but he knew all about me. Anyway, he called and wanted me on a session he was doing with a blues singer (and) about a week later he called and asked if I'd like to go on the road with him. I must say his terms were very generous." The first concert was in San Diego: "I'd never seen so many people at one time. It was a different audience altogether, it was a young audience, we couldn't do anything wrong. There must have been 7,000 people out there and HE was the headliner." (from Down Beat, 5/20/76, pgs. 20, 44.)

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This Blue Mitchell era is actually the John Mayall period which I like least. To me, Mayall himself is all right as a complement to strong players. Mayall is an O.K. vocalist, harmonica player and keyboard player. Also, I think Mayall does much better when he sticks to 1950s style Chicago blues, To me, his jazzier explorations are not nearly as interesting or successful.

Personally I like his early small group blues albums with the British blues guitarists: Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton, A Hard Road (with Peter Green)--the 2 CD Deluxe edition is far better than the single disc in my opinion, and Crusade, with Mick Taylor. He got those guitarists when they were young and hungry and playing their hearts out to try to make it. I find those albums to be quite successful. I also like his 1980s and 1990s albums with different guitarists featured, such as Walter Trout and Coco Montoya. He had a real resurgence in that period. I saw him live with Coco Montoya and it was an exciting blues concert.

As for Blue Mitchell, I recall an interview with him in which he said something to the effect that when he first got off a plane with the Mayall band, he wondered who all the people were, who were standing there waiting to greet the plane.

I haven't heard it but there's a newly issued Mayall CD, live in 1967 with Peter Green.

http://www.amazon.com/Live-67-John-Mayalls-Bluesbreakers/dp/B00T73ATC0/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1430504226&sr=1-1&keywords=john+mayall+live+in+%2767

Edited by kh1958

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This Blue Mitchell era is actually the John Mayall period which I like least. To me, Mayall himself is all right as a complement to strong players. Mayall is an O.K. vocalist, harmonica player and keyboard player. Also, I think Mayall does much better when he sticks to 1950s style Chicago blues, To me, his jazzier explorations are not nearly as interesting or successful.

Personally I like his early small group blues albums with the British blues guitarists: Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton, A Hard Road (with Peter Green)--the 2 CD Deluxe edition is far better than the single disc in my opinion, and Crusade, with Mick Taylor. He got those guitarists when they were young and hungry and playing their hearts out to try to make it. I find those albums to be quite successful. I also like his 1980s and 1990s albums with different guitarists featured, such as Walter Trout and Coco Montoya. He had a real resurgence in that period. I saw him live with Coco Montoya and it was an exciting blues concert.

As for Blue Mitchell, I recall an interview with him in which he said something to the effect that when he first got off a plane with the Mayall band, he wondered who all the people were, who were standing there waiting to greet the plane.

I haven't heard it but there's a newly issued Mayall CD, live in 1967 with Peter Green.

http://www.amazon.com/Live-67-John-Mayalls-Bluesbreakers/dp/B00T73ATC0/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1430504226&sr=1-1&keywords=john+mayall+live+in+%2767

I noticed that recently, too. It sounds like it's probably bootleg quality, though. I'll need to hear some of it to find out if it's listenable.

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Thanks for posting, Michael.

I have so many fond memories of collecting discography of Blue Mitchell.

(My first Mosaic many years ago...)

Blue had so many distinct periods- as documented on OJC, Blue Note, and subsequent smaller labels (i.e. Mainstream).

He later co-lead groups with Junior Cook, Harold Land, etc.-- kept him busy until he ended his career as a sideman before dying prematurely of cancer

Michael, did you ever play piano in a group with Blue..?

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Thanks for posting, Michael.

I have so many fond memories of collecting discography of Blue Mitchell.

(My first Mosaic many years ago...)

Blue had so many distinct periods- as documented on OJC, Blue Note, and subsequent smaller labels (i.e. Mainstream).

He later co-lead groups with Junior Cook, Harold Land, etc.-- kept him busy until he ended his career as a sideman before dying prematurely of cancer

Michael, did you ever play piano in a group with Blue..?

Unfortunately I didn't get to NYC in time to have had the opportunity to meet or play with Blue.

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