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Stonewall15

LF Los Angeles Jazz Institute (LAJI) CD

23 posts in this topic

 

I am looking for LAJI-01 "Jazz A La Lighthouse".

I will pay $50 for the CD. Must be original with all front and back matter.

Please PM me.

Edited by Stonewall15
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I'm planning on going to Amoeba in the next week or so for my birthday. I'll keep an eye out for them

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I you happen to have any idea what the covers look like it would help. I search the "Various Artists" section every time I go to Amoeba but have no clue what I'm looking for. 

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Howard Rumsey's Lighthouse All-Stars' "Modern Jazz a la Lighthouse" (LAJI-01) looks like this:

R-11629577-1519687011-2547.jpeg.jpg

Here's a tiny picture of the cover to Howard Rumsey's "West Coast Rarities":

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/_v7Bk4C9563Y/SvLh9u6XJyI/AAAAAAAAI04/2Qlu4ohdemE/s320/Shorty+-+LAJI+West+Coast+Rarities.jpg

And here is the backer:

R-11360548-1514932803-4446.jpeg.jpg

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It looks like you can still get the West Coast Rarities CD if you become a member of LAJI ($50).  They no longer show that particular Rumsey/Lighthouse All-Stars disc as being available, though. 

L.A. Jazz Institute membership

 

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I continue to look while I’m out but no success yet. 

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From the LJI website, it looks like they've issued 10 CDs but only four of them are available. The $50 membership sounds like a good idea.  

Please let us know how you make out. 

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8 minutes ago, Stonewall15 said:

LAJI has issued 14 CDs. Number 15 is supposedly underway.

I stand corrected!  Do you have a complete list. 

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LAJI-001 Jazz A La Lighthouse

LAJI-002 West Coast Rarities

LAJI-003 West Coast Big Band Rarities

LAJI-004 The Rare And Unissued Shorty Rogers

LAJI-005 Stan Kenton's Artistry In Comedy

LAJI-006 Shorty Rogers And His Giants Live At The Rendezvous Ballroom vol. 1

LAJI-007 Shorty Rogers And His Giants Live At The Rendezvous Ballroom vol. 2

LAJI-008 Howard Lucraft And His Music

LAJI-009 Rare And Unissued Chet Baker

LAJI-010 Howard Rumsey's Lighthouse All-Stars On The Air

LAJI-011 Howard Rumsey's Lighthouse All-Stars Live In The Solo Spotlight

LAJI-012 Over The Rainbow- Rare And Unissued Art Pepper

LAJI-013 West Coast Jazz On Television- Rare And Unissued Jazz On TV

LAJI-014 Welcome Home Stan! - Stan Kenton & His Orchestra With Anita O'Day

LAJI-015 Gerry Mulligan- Swing House

LAJI-016 Stan Getz (more on title to come)

Edited by Stonewall15
Correction

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Thanks for the leads everyone, but I'm only searching them on behalf of Stonewall. Since I'm in Los Angeles I thought the opportunity of finding them used local would be greater. 

Edited by jcam_44

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I hope you find them.

LAJI issued 300 copies of each. Unfortunately, a number of the "Modern Jazz a la Lighthouse" were defective and did not play through.  Consequently, that one will be much harder to find in playable shape.

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I checked while at Amoeba today and still no luck

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They’re a bunch of cds from the series on eBay now... prices for west coast rarities is pretty insane. I’ll be hitting Amoeba soon, this week or next and will look for you again. 

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22 minutes ago, jcam_44 said:

 prices for west coast rarities is pretty insane.

Looks like it's not so much the "prices" that are insane ($9.99 starting bid was reasonable) but what is insane is that there are two out there who want it at ANY cost it seems and are battling it out now. :D
Reminds one of the time when Asiatic ebayers like ondemand12 were running up the bids almost everywhere on the somewhat rarer items.

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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I still think eBay shot themselves in the foot when they made the bidders anonymous. Back when you could see the bidders, you could tell right away if you had shills. Now, anyone can shill their own rare item and no one can know.

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I bet they're using algorithms.

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2 hours ago, bresna said:

I still think eBay shot themselves in the foot when they made the bidders anonymous. Back when you could see the bidders, you could tell right away if you had shills. Now, anyone can shill their own rare item and no one can know.

I assume that at some point they determined that the fees they were losing by people making deals outside of the eBay system when bidders' identities and contact info were visible outweighed any concerns they may (or may not) have had concerning shill bidding. 

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On 2/27/2020 at 7:04 PM, Dave Garrett said:

I assume that at some point they determined that the fees they were losing by people making deals outside of the eBay system when bidders' identities and contact info were visible outweighed any concerns they may (or may not) have had concerning shill bidding. 

I assume that that had less to do with it than they love an auction where a shill bidder bids up the selling price. That inflates their cut. They have no financial incentive to stop shill bidding, In fact, back when they still showed bidders names, they really never investigated any complaints, no matter how obvious they were.

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1 hour ago, bresna said:

I assume that that had less to do with it than they love an auction where a shill bidder bids up the selling price. That inflates their cut. They have no financial incentive to stop shill bidding, In fact, back when they still showed bidders names, they really never investigated any complaints, no matter how obvious they were.

That may be one reason. But in the day when they still showed bidders' names there sometimes were other factors at work. I remember one case (that went on for a very long time) where one particular bidder in the field of automotive collectabilia consistently placed insanely high bids that often went way beyond the actual "market values" of the items in question and was clueless or careles enough to place his sky-high bids as starting bids. This quickly pissed off a lot of other bidders who never got wining bids in at what would have been a decent and affordable price that at least halfway reflected the actual value. I got to talk via mail with two of them (one with whom i had "crossed swords" in a number of auctions. though in a sporting way - and in fact we went on to echange material off eBay, and one who both sold and bought lots on eBay). That bidder (who at that time used a ebayer pseudo that clearly hinted at his actual name) was known in some of these circles as the owner of quite a collection of Italian sports cars and therefore evidently had money to burn. In fact those other bidders (and there probably were more) were pissed off enough to make a point of RAISING his starting bids even on items they weren't interested in because his bidding tactics (or rather lack of) made it evident after a few checks how high he'd bid outright. So even though nobody else may have been interested they made dead sure (and I admit I occasionally joined the game at a lower level ;)) that whatever he bid on he would not get at, say, the starting bid of $9.99 (in case no one else bid too) but would have to shell out $50 or more in each and every case (and at that sum his STARTING bids had not even been reached yet ...). Served him right ... <_<

 

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That particular tactic has been around for as long as auctions have been going on. That is NOT shill bidding. That is active bidders actively screwing another (asshole) bidder. Those bidders often do run the risk of winning that auction, so they aren't as cavalier as you make it out to be. I know, because my Dad was big into Indian Motocycle auctions, and I had seen him "give the bidder middle finger" to those "deep pocket" bidders on many occasions. He enjoyed watching them "win" their item at an overly-inflated price. I was once at a Skinner auction where Jay Leno did this to an anonymous phone bidder on a Henderson 4 cylinder bike once the bidding got into the stratosphere. The whole crowd was laughing as Jay bid him up, knowing full well that if he accidentally won, he could afford it.

Don't confuse shill bidders with real bidders who are willing to bump up a bid to screw another bidder. Shill bidders are usually inked directly to the seller.... usually it IS the seller. Their sole goal is to drive up the price by placing fake bids. In your scenario, real bidders bid it up with every intention of paying if they win. Not so with shill bidders,

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I am perfectly well aware of the difference between fake bidders bidding to net the seller more money and the scenario that you and I described. I described it as ANOTHER reason (i.e. a reason different from shill bidding) why some bids may have gotten out of hand, particularly in the earlier days of eBay. And the risk of accidentally winning an auction at what you yourself normally would not be willing to pay and would not be able to afford in the long run of course was very real. I do not really remember and did not keep track of how far the other bidders went when they raised that "deep pocket" bidder but his winning bids always WERE high. And I do remember that when I tried it myself (because I had been irked a number of times too when I saw that character's name as the starting bidder and realized that "there goes your chance of winning THAT auction too") I cautiously went in $10 instalments and found that even at something like $40 or 50 for a simple (and not exceedingly rare) 50s US car magazine I incredibly enough had not had the leading bid yet. But of course I had taken a look at his bidding history on a number of similar previous auctions. In those days, with actual bidders' names being displayed, things were VERY transparent. ;)

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