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What Classical Music Are You Listening To?

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Dvorak - String Quartet No.7, Op.16

Beethoven - String Trio No.5, Op.70/1 "Ghost" 

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On 9/8/2020 at 11:28 AM, Referentzhunter said:

any recommendations :shrug[1]: for Ives music.

Referentzhunter,

I created a website dedicated to Charles Ives and his music.  You can find it at http://www.musicweb-international.com/Ives/ 

To view my favorite Ives recordings, click the "Survey of Recordings" link on the left.  One note: I haven't updated the site in nearly 15 years, so it doesn't include anything recent.  However, the site includes a near-complete review of extant recordings up 'til then. 

By that way, that Michael Tilson Thomas version of Ives' Fourth Symphony is a desert-island pick.  :tup 

Edited by HutchFan

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Kk 485-500

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36 minutes ago, HutchFan said:

Referentzhunter,

I created a website dedicated to Charles Ives and his music.  You can find it at http://www.musicweb-international.com/Ives/ 

To view my favorite Ives recordings, click the "Survey of Recordings" link on the left.  One note: I haven't updated the site in nearly 15 years, so it doesn't include anything recent.  However, the site includes a near-complete review of extant recordings up 'til then. 

By that way, that Michael Tilson Thomas version of Ives' Fourth Symphony is a desert-island pick.  :tup 

oh thank you very much ... i will check the website for sure. It's the second time now i hear positive reactions on the fourth Symphony by Michael Tilson Thomas and mine is positive to ...  so this could be a reference ..... i have to listen again. Thank you again for your support. :tup:tup:tup

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30 minutes ago, Referentzhunter said:

oh thank you very much ... i will check the website for sure. It's the second time now i hear positive reactions on the fourth Symphony by Michael Tilson Thomas and mine is positive to ...  so this could be a reference ..... i have to listen again. Thank you again for your support. :tup:tup:tup

You're welcome! ... I'm always happy to help others find their way into Ives' music.  :) 

 

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Mozart - Piano Concerto No.13, K.415

Mendelssohn - String Quartet Op.12

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Climbing steadily in my personal Bach charts ....

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1 hour ago, Chuck Nessa said:

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I've got and like both Kamu-Berwald discs, though I recall  that the old Ehrling was a bit better -- but in rather dim early '60s  LP sound IIRC. Yesterday I ordered the Dausgaard set, cheap now on Brilliant Classics (two CDs for about $9). Some said it was very good, though some said it lacked punch. I don't think of Berwald as a very "punchy" composer though. We shall see. 

I think I can say without fear of contradiction that Berwald is not an easy composer to get just right, and when he isn't gotten just right or close to just right, some find him to be mererlty workmanlike, with a quirk or two, That particular swatch of time -- 1840s-'50s -- was pretty unsettled in Euorpean music in general, and Berwald's position in Denmark seems to have been especially equivocal for reasons that seem to have been related to that country's then rather provincial musical culture. For instance, Berwald's forte seems to have been orchestral/symphonic music, but Denmark had no taste for that sort of music at that time; opera was what was wanted there, and IIRC his major orchestral scores got no hearing win Denmark at the time. Also, not being able to make a go of it financially as a composer, Berwald got involved In running a lumber mill IIRC. When Liszt eventually heard Berwald's music, he was enthusiastic about its harmonic and formal subtleties, which in retrospect seem dead on.

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44 minutes ago, Larry Kart said:

I've got and like both Kamu-Berwald discs, though I recall  that the old Ehrling was a bit better -- but in rather dim early '60s  LP sound IIRC. Yesterday I ordered the Dausgaard set, cheap now on Brilliant Classics (two CDs for about $9). Some said it was very good, though some said it lacked punch. I don't think of Berwald as a very "punchy" composer though. We shall see. 

I think I can say without fear of contradiction that Berwald is not an easy composer to get just right, and when he isn't gotten just right or close to just right, some find him to be mererlty workmanlike, with a quirk or two, That particular swatch of time -- 1840s-'50s -- was pretty unsettled in Euorpean music in general, and Berwald's position in Denmark seems to have been especially equivocal for reasons that seem to have been related to that country's then rather provincial musical culture. For instance, Berwald's forte seems to have been orchestral/symphonic music, but Denmark had no taste for that sort of music at that time; opera was what was wanted there, and IIRC his major orchestral scores got no hearing win Denmark at the time. Also, not being able to make a go of it financially as a composer, Berwald got involved In running a lumber mill IIRC. When Liszt eventually heard Berwald's music, he was enthusiastic about its harmonic and formal subtleties, which in retrospect seem dead on.

What does Denmark have to do with it?

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56 minutes ago, Chuck Nessa said:

What does Denmark have to do with it?

Wasn't Denmark Berwald's home country and wasn't it Denmark's musical culture within which he frustratingly tried to function? In particular, if your gift is for symphonic music, and you can't get a hearing for that music in your home country, such that you have to retreat to running a sawmill  in an attempt to make a living, Denmark in the 1840s would seem to have something to do with it. Also, in that era, countries and even fairly musically sophisticated cities like Leipzig, where IIRC Berwald's music did get a hearing,  seemed to be culturally far more isolated than would be the case later on. IIRC. Favoring the home-grown was a common theme, and Berwald was an outsider several times over.

Milieu matters, no? Imagine Roscoe Mitchell with all his extravagant gifts growing up in a city that lacked Chicago's rich, yeasty jazz heritage, a city with no Muhal, no AACM, none or few of Roscoe's eventual musical partners., and, for that matter, no Chuck Nessa at Delmark with the ears to hear what Roscoe could do and thus no "Sound." Also a city that was, like Copenhagen in the 1840s,  not particularly linked in terms of what was going on in terms of musical culture with other cities in the world. If that had been the milieu, where might Roscoe be today?

Back to the mid-19th Century, was it incidental to their eventual impact that Liszt was a much traveled  sexy/semi-scandalous virtuoso and one-man font of publicity and Berlioz was doing his best to tear up the pea-patch in Paris, the virtual capital of the 19th Century. And even then, the disparity between what Berlioz wanted to do musically and what opportunities Paris of that era was able to/chose to offer him almost drove him out of his cotton-picking mind. 

 

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50 minutes ago, Peter Friedman said:

Beethoven - Piano Trio No.7, Op.97 "Archduke"81qlYT-nPVL._AC_UY218_.jpg

Wonderful music indeed ....

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This superb recording reliably delivers a much needed consolation ....

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38 minutes ago, Larry Kart said:

Wasn't Denmark Berwald's home country and wasn't it Denmark's musical culture within which he frustratingly tried to function? In particular, if your gift is for symphonic music, and you can't get a hearing for that music in your home country, such that you have to retreat to running a sawmill  in an attempt to make a living, Denmark in the 1840s would seem to have something to do with it. Also, in that era, countries and even fairly musically sophisticated cities like Leipzig, where IIRC Berwald's music did get a hearing,  seemed to be culturally far more isolated than would be the case later on. IIRC. Favoring the home-grown was a common theme, and Berwald was an outsider several times over.

Sweden?

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2 minutes ago, Chuck Nessa said:

Sweden?

Oops. I got on the wrong ferry. But the rest of what I said still goes, no?

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