Niko

Jazz Books in Dutch

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I hope that some of the Dutch board members can help me here (others are invited as well !)... I will be moving to the Netherlands (Tilburg) in August and don't know the language yet... I will certainly take classes when the time comes and don't really have to learn it for my job, but ... earlier today I remembered that I basically learned English from reading Jazz books (assisted by more formal classes) and that this method really worked out for me back then... similarly, the only thing I do to keep up my French is the occasional Jazz book which is not available otherwise (San Quentin Jazz Band, or more recently Jean-Pol Schroeder's books on jazz in and around Liège)...

Thus I wondered: Can you recommend any books on Jazz which are only available in Dutch? I am more interested in history or biographies than in "the technical side", preferably with a focus on the period between about 1940 and 1990, either in Europe or in the US... The only Dutch jazz books I know are the Baker and Webster biographies by Jeroen de Valk - I know the English translation, otherwise those would be exactly what I am looking for...

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Niko, there's another book by Jeroen de Valk (only in Dutch).

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And a good book written by Coen de Jonge, "Belevenissen in bebop: Rein de Graaff".

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It's hard to find. I have some more Dutch jazz Books, but these are out of print (OOP).   

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'Jazz' by Jules Deelder. (Only second hand)

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Niko, no doubt you are familar with (and own) one or the other edition of Joachim Ernst Berendt's "Jazzbuch".
This book did exist in Dutch. I have the Dutch version of the original 1953 edition (bought on a whim at a "vintage fleamarket" im Amsterdam close to 20 years ago).

So if you would also like to go the "comparison" route to learn Dutch after all (sometimes it helps - I know it has helped me in similar setups with other languages), drop me a line and I will be happy to mail it to you. I don't really need it actually and it is just taking up space in my crate of music books and mags for sale.

On a jazz-related aspect, just in case you are interested in Rhythm & Blues to some extent you may remember a reissue series of Mercury masters done by Polygram in the early 90s ("Back Beat - The Rhythm of the Blues").

A Dutch book to accompany this series (and elaborate on the subject) written and compiled by Eddy Determeyer was published at the time by Van Hoeve publishers: "Back Beat - De Gouden Jaren van de Rhyhtm & Blues". To the extent that I can cope with reading Dutch (more or less ... ;-) ) it really is very well done as an introduction to the subject.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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@cyril: thanks - this is exactly what I was asking for... it leads me into a related question: Where do I buy used Dutch books (online)?

Edited by Niko

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@big beat steve: remembering your knowledge of ancient issues of orkester journalen etc, I thought of you when I wrote "others are invited as well"... will drop you a line (of course, I know the book, grew up with 1989 edition but only have an edition from around 1970 at this point...) - and thanks for "Eddy Determeyer"

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@Niko:

Orkester Journalen is Swedish ... different call ... ;)

If you can find original copies of DE JAZZ WERELD, consider yourself lucky. ;)

As for Berendt's book (I grew up with the 1974 issue, BTW, which I still have - in addition to the 1953 and 1959 issues), if you only have the 1970 issue at this time then the 1953 issue (which was the 1st edition, actually) should be sufficiently different. But of course reading differnt language versions of identical issues side by side is not the worst way of learning some basics the easy way (or just using the German edition to crosscheck what you think you understood), and even those older editions aren't hard to get secondhand.

 

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Thanks! I had reserved Harry Potter for reading something highly familiar in Dutch but Behrendt will do as well (and right now I can easily get all the old editions before 1989 at the library which still holds many treasures from back when we still had "jazz education" around here - luckily, the folks back then were smart enough to keep all the old versions). (And I knew that Orkester Journalen is not Dutch - just wanted to highlight that you seem to read many of the European languages from what you write here)

@Cyril: thanks, order placed!

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55 minutes ago, Niko said:

And I knew that Orkester Journalen is not Dutch - just wanted to highlight that you seem to read many of the European languages from what you write here

 

Very flattering ... but my reading and writing knowledge of Swedish is FAR superior to that of Dutch. I can cope with reading Dutch as it does have its similarities with German but still it is a struggle ...

 

BTW, do your musical interests also extend beyond jazz (even if only in a casual way)?
Just in case you ever feel like delving into some specifically Dutch part of rock history, you are likely to come across those "Indo" rock bands from the late 50s and early/mid-60s. "Rockin' Ramona" (the title obvously referring to that worldwide MONSTER hit by the Blue Diamonds) by Lutgard Mutsaers (SDU uitgeverij, 's-Gravenhage 1989) is a nice book on this subject.

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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With Dutch, I have the suspicion that actually speaking it will be the biggest challenge (followed by writing) while reading texts in Dutch without any formal training or much exposure works out surprisingly well... my musical interests are fairly broad  - and I especially like reading stories about bands (even beyond what I actually listen to) so any good music book is welcome advice. (In this case, there's a further appeal since both my parents and grandparents spent several years in Indonesia)... Thanks!

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In the 1980s there have been several issues of the Jazzjaarboek (Yearbook of Jazz), that would fit the bill very nicely. Although relatively small format books, they covered a broad spectrum (mainstream to free) with essays, reviews, interviews, etc. You can find used copies quite easily and they're not expensive (usually less than 10 euro).

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And some more:

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Niko, you can find good jazz books at flea markets and second hand stores.

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Hey Niko,
moving to Tilburg? That's nice. I like the area and the people in that part of the country seem to have warm attitude by nature. Lovely cities and countryside. Hope you'll enjoy living there! Do you mean books about Dutch jazz and or musicians or books in Dutch about general jazz subjects? You have had much advice already, so not sure I'll be able to add new material. I'd prefer second hand books myself and you can always become of a member of the public library. You'll be able to lend music as well, from the National selection. I can highly recommend it. Really nice that you want to learn Dutch by reading jazz book. I have one family member who learned most Dutch because of Dutch songs. I think it really helps when you use something that has your interest, it helps to learn quicker. "Toi, toi, toi" for luck (that's a Dutch 'good luck'- wish usually used in the theatre/artist circle) for your efforts! :)
regards, page

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3 hours ago, page said:

 I think it really helps when you use something that has your interest, it helps to learn quicker. "Toi, toi, toi" for luck (that's a Dutch 'good luck'- wish usually used in the theatre/artist circle) for your efforts! :)
 

VERY true! I made huge and fast progress in learning English at school when I was in my "soccer" phase at age 13-14 and literally DEVOURED English soccer mags that I had gotten hold of.

And half of the progress I made in learning to read and write in Swedish came from my Swedish jazz books and mags (the other half came from classic car magazines ;))

Have been trying for some time to get my son to go the same way in learning French in a more entertaining way (by buying him the occasional Heavy Metal music mag when I am over in France) but this is only now beginning to show some results - he even bought himself a rock guitar tuition manual in French when we were on holiday in France recently.

BTW, "toi toi toi" is in common use in German too - in the same sense. ;)

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15 hours ago, njtw said:

Here's another interesting book:

I'm The Beat (of De Korte Beentjes van Art Blakey) by Max Bolleman, Dutch jazz musician, engineer & producer.

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See this website: http://www.draaiomjeoren.com/boeken/imthebeat.html

Good book, njtw !!!

There is a good jazz club in Tilburg called the 'PaRaDox' , see: https://paradoxtilburg.nl/

And not far from Tilburg in Belgium (Rijkevorsel) you have also a very good club, 'The Singer': https://www.desinger.be/

And don't forget jazz Middelheim (Belgium): http://www.jazzmiddelheim.be/line-up

Enjoy!

 

Edited by Cyril

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"books about Dutch jazz and or musicians or books in Dutch about general jazz subjects" both actually... thank you all for the further ideas - I will definitely try used bookstores once I am there (only three months left), and also the public library! And special thanks to Big Beat Steve for the first edition of the Jazz Book in Dutch! Some things are familiar from later editions but this competition between "blanke" and "zwarte" musicians was not laid out that clearly later on ...

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