JSngry

Return Of The Film Corner Thread

2,430 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, catesta said:

I watched this once before several weeks ago and then again this weekend. It's a good one.

The Gentlemen (2019 film) - Wikipedia

Agreed! Saw it in the theatre and just watched it again last night. I do love Guy Ritchie's British gangster movies!

Hugh Grant is especially good in this one!

 

 

 

gregmo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rewatched one of my all-time favorite films --

9343845_1.jpg?v=8CC9B2F3E7328E0

It's so brilliant on so many levels -- the acting, the writing, the choreography, the cinematography, the editing (Oscar winner Alan Heim), the musical score (Oscar winner Ralph Burns), the costuming (Oscar winner Albert Wolsky) and set designing.  And if none of that impresses you, there is always Ann Reinking :wub:!!!  For a film so centered around death, it's simply brimming with life.  I remember when I first saw it when it came out in 1979, I was so  gobsmacked by the whole experience, I stayed in my seat to watch the next showing.  Rarely have I done that with a film. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking through Netflix the other night and saw a "new to me" Bruce Willis action flick, "Trauma Center" (2019). Holy cow is this movie bad and Bruce Willis appears stoned or drunk during his (brief) appearances. Even if he was straight-up sober, his performance was cringe-worthy.

undefined

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, gmonahan said:

Agreed! Saw it in the theatre and just watched it again last night. I do love Guy Ritchie's British gangster movies!

Hugh Grant is especially good in this one!

 

 

 

gregmo

Yeah, I have to admit, I'm not sure the cast could have been any better. McConaughey, Hunnam, Farrell, Golding and Grant, all excellent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Borat - the Sequel.

I don't care for the Borat movies (too much like shooting fish in a barrel), but my question is how does he get the people he puts in these films to sign releases?  I know that in a lot of cases people will sign the release and never see the final edit, but for instance, there is this scene with Rudy Giuliani in the sequel.  Given what we know about this scene, how could he ever have gotten a signed release?  Or is he relying on some sort of "public figure" exemption?  I wouldn't think that would apply in this case.  Just daring Rudy to sue him?  I don't get it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, ejp626 said:

Borat - the Sequel.

I don't care for the Borat movies (too much like shooting fish in a barrel), but my question is how does he get the people he puts in these films to sign releases?  I know that in a lot of cases people will sign the release and never see the final edit, but for instance, there is this scene with Rudy Giuliani in the sequel.  Given what we know about this scene, how could he ever have gotten a signed release?  Or is he relying on some sort of "public figure" exemption?  I wouldn't think that would apply in this case.  Just daring Rudy to sue him?  I don't get it.

In the first Borat movie (which was riotous), the people in the movie signed extensive releases.  However, your question seems to be not what they signed but what compelled them to do so. In other words, why? That seems a question only answerable by those people.

Here’s an article on the releases involved in the first movie, Borat Tricked Me: Can’t I Sue Him or Something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Brad said:

In the first Borat movie (which was riotous), the people in the movie signed extensive releases.  However, your question seems to be not what they signed but what compelled them to do so. In other words, why? That seems a question only answerable by those people.

Here’s an article on the releases involved in the first movie, Borat Tricked Me: Can’t I Sue Him or Something?

I probably didn't phrase that well.  I'm not truly that surprised by the folks in the first movie did sign releases.  Mostly it points to the fact that people don't read or understand most of what they are signing.  Though it does surprise me a bit that footage perhaps taken from hidden cameras and certainly taken in what I would consider a fraudulent manner can be covered by such a release.  Maybe this is in the article. 

It is a surprise that Giuliani signed such a release -- or did he?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On The Rocks - Apple+ TV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched Dr. No last night (for obvious reasons).  I don't believe I had seen this one before, which is odd, as I thought I had seen all the Connery and Moore Bonds but only a handful of the others.  (I'm essentially taking the position that the Daniel Craig ones don't even exist...) 

At the risk of being heretical, it's kind of creaky and not particularly thrilling (all the plot twists are visible a mile away) -- and with a complete absence of interesting spy gadgets.  It's actually a bit surprising that they built the franchise from such a beginning.

I found myself more interested in what had been lifted directly from this movie for Austin Powers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From Russia with Love - This was a much stronger outing in my view, clearly the budget had been increased, and we have the appearance of the first spy-rigged suitcase.  While all Bond villains talk too much, this one actually appeared ready to kill Bond and was only tripped up a bit by his greed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/14/2020 at 1:25 PM, Matthew said:

A bit hard to follow at times, but it's Bogie and Bacall so who cares?  Over and above the bookstore scenes, I'm partial to this swatch of thinly veiled dialog between Marlowe and Vivian Rutledge.  The censors must have had a ball (no pun intended) deciding if someone was trying to do an end run around the Hays Production Code.

 

    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Dave James said:

A bit hard to follow at times, but it's Bogie and Bacall so who cares?  Over and above the bookstore scenes, I'm partial to this swatch of thinly veiled dialog between Marlowe and Vivian Rutledge.  The censors must have had a ball (no pun intended) deciding if someone was trying to do an end run around the Hays Production Code.

 

    

That's what makes The Big Sleep such a great film, the acting and dialogue are so great, that you don't care you never find out how Owen died, they asked Chandler, and he had no idea either!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Matthew said:

That's what makes The Big Sleep such a great film, the acting and dialogue are so great, that you don't care you never find out how Owen died, they asked Chandler, and he had no idea either!

It may be the greatest movie ever made that made no sense at all.

 

 

 

 

gregmo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry We Missed You - dir. by Ken Loach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/2/2020 at 9:29 AM, Matthew said:

That's what makes The Big Sleep such a great film, the acting and dialogue are so great, that you don't care you never find out how Owen died, they asked Chandler, and he had no idea either!

There are two versions of this movie.  They sent the earlier version to Armed Forces abroad. Then To Have and Have Not came out and Bacall's agent fought to have more scenes with her put intoThe Big Sleep .  You can get both versions on the same DVD.   Some people have claimed that the earlier version made more sense: It doesn't. BTW to me the book points to Joe Brody as the killer o.Owen Taylor.   Brody  keeps changing his story, each time admitting that he was with Owen closer to his death than in his previous story, and he does end up with  the photos Owen was carrying. 

On 10/14/2020 at 1:25 PM, Matthew said:

In the book she is referred to as "an intelligent  Jewess" and someone has written a whole book with her as the protagonist. 

Edited by medjuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to see all of AFI's "Ten Top Ten." Only one to go after this one:

 

laura.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9dcc3a056cf1a24474384bb3defa78f6.jpg

It's been decades since i read the book, but this seems like yet another only partially successful Cornell Woolrich adaptation.  The main reason to watch it is there in the small print -- "Directed by Robert Siodmak".  He creates some nice noirish scenes in the film -- moments which are both beautiful to look and and eerily uncomfortable to watch.  It's not giving much away to say Franchot Tone is the villain in the film.  He hams it up like he's starring in one of Universal's monster flicks. Elisha Cook Jr. plays the world's horniest drummer.   Interesting to note the song played on the jukebox in the opening scene, "I'll Remember April" which I assume the always budget conscious Universal had some financial rights/interest in since the song made its debut in another Universal film, Abbot & Costello's Ride 'Em Cowboy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, duaneiac said:

9dcc3a056cf1a24474384bb3defa78f6.jpg

It's been decades since i read the book, but this seems like yet another only partially successful Cornell Woolrich adaptation.  The main reason to watch it is there in the small print -- "Directed by Robert Siodmak".  He creates some nice noirish scenes in the film -- moments which are both beautiful to look and and eerily uncomfortable to watch.  It's not giving much away to say Franchot Tone is the villain in the film.  He hams it up like he's starring in one of Universal's monster flicks. Elisha Cook Jr. plays the world's horniest drummer.   Interesting to note the song played on the jukebox in the opening scene, "I'll Remember April" which I assume the always budget conscious Universal had some financial rights/interest in since the song made its debut in another Universal film, Abbot & Costello's Ride 'Em Cowboy.

Ella Raines is out of sight in general and especially in and after the great scene where she induces Elisha Cook Jr. to flip out during a jam session.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Larry Kart said:

Ella Raines is out of sight in general and especially in and after the great scene where she induces Elisha Cook Jr. to flip out during a jam session.

Yes, she was good.  That scene and the scene where she learns the truth about the villain are good.  What I always delight in are the outstanding character actors one can find even in lower budget films of those days.  The two cops who accompany the principal detective have this air of weariness and casual brutality about them.  The woman in charge of the millinery shop which created the hat which plays a pivotal role in the film -- few lines but the actress who portrayed her made her a memorable character.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bluedahlia.jpg

For which Raymond Chandler wrote his own Cornell Woolrich tale of an innocent man, suspected of killing his wife, on the run from the law and out to find the real killer.  I like the scene when his character is on the lam, he listens to a radio broadcast in which they give a description of him as a man wanted by the police.  The description includes what he was last seen wearing, weight -- but no mention of height!   A touchy subject for the petite Mr. Ladd, allegedly.  I think this and Shane are the only Alan Ladd movies I've ever seen. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, duaneiac said:

bluedahlia.jpg

For which Raymond Chandler wrote his own Cornell Woolrich tale of an innocent man, suspected of killing his wife, on the run from the law and out to find the real killer.  I like the scene when his character is on the lam, he listens to a radio broadcast in which they give a description of him as a man wanted by the police.  The description includes what he was last seen wearing, weight -- but no mention of height!   A touchy subject for the petite Mr. Ladd, allegedly.  I think this and Shane are the only Alan Ladd movies I've ever seen. 

Sounds a bit like a Hitchcock thriller when described this way. (Hitch  did make  one film, Rear Window, from a Woolrich story.)  I've only read a couple of Cornell Woolrich books.: which ones most parallel Blue Dahlia? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, medjuck said:

Sounds a bit like a Hitchcock thriller when described this way. (Hitch  did make  one film, Rear Window, from a Woolrich story.)  I've only read a couple of Cornell Woolrich books.: which ones most parallel Blue Dahlia? 

Phantom Lady might be the closest comparison.  That is perhaps why these two films were included in this 3 CD set I bought --

81H6RchAQQL._SY679_.jpg

The Black Path of Fear kind of fits that plot mold, but the protagonist runs off to Cuba with a mob boss' woman (so he's not exactly an "innocent" man) and when she gets killed, he is the patsy fingered for the murder and he has to outrace and outwit both the police and the mob boss to stay alive and prove his innocence.  I wrote about the less than satisfying film adaptation of this book last year here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

chained-for-life-movie-poster-1951-10204

They can't all be gems.  Granted, the curiosity factor got the best of me and roped me into watching this "movie" ("stationarie" would be more like it).  This film must have been made with a budget even thinner than its plot.  To pad out a story about these vaudeville headlining sisters, the producers tossed in a number of other vaudeville performers -- folks neither Ed Sullivan nor Ted Mack would have endured for a minute -- to "entertain" us with their entire acts.  Admittedly, the accordionist playing the "William Tell Overture" is perhaps the most enjoyable thing in this film, but then he goes and spoils that by playing a second number!  No!  Bad accordionist!  No!

Whew!  According to Wikipedia, the Hilton Sisters had an even more unpleasant life than that which was portrayed here.  However, also worth noting is :  "Violet was a skilled saxophonist and Daisy a violinist."  Now, everybody be honest -- you kinda want to see that!  It's just human nature.  But when the producers got so desperate they even put in a juggler who can juggle three -- count 'em, three -- plates, they could have at least given a couple of minutes to the sax and violin playing conjoined twins performing "Shuffle Off To Buffalo"!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When it comes to Veronica Lake, I'm certifiable.  Don't ask me why or how, but I got hooked on her years ago.  I have books, photos, autographs, DVD's...you name it.  Bette Davis said she was the most photogenic actress in the history of Hollywood.  No argument here.

02fb943eb4145d238e19cefe1055055b.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.