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BFT 153 (December 2016) link & discussion thread

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2 hours ago, JSngry said:

Ok, finally got everything set up, now with the usual thanks and disclaimers firmly in place, let's play!

TRACK ONE - Opening had me expecting Terry Callier, but nope. No idea. Sounds like she's hoping. I wish her luck.  Me too.  I wish us all luck.

TRACK TWO - Gil Scott (not Jill Scott!). Funny how the classics never go out of style.  Yep.

TRACK THREE - Sounds like Sugarcane. No idea which album, a quick contrast of this track time with what I can find of the MPS albums shows nothing, but I don't know where else he's recorded, the guy was around forever. It is kind of a drag that the tempo slows down a little after some point. I was maybe thinking John Blair (remember him?) but I don't think he ever made a record like this. That guitarist has a weird kind of Tiny Grimes PLUNCK-iness, so I don't know, I don't think that's Tiny Grimes on guitar.  Sugarcane on MPS, but not remotely Grimes.

TRACK FOUR - Jimmy Heath from the early-ish 70s, which were, I think, his best years overall in terms of making records. Curtis Fuller, what is this one? Released on Landmark after the fact, correct? Anyway, that's a good record, as was anything Jimmy Heath showed up on or around during that time. Also interesting here...you can hear the "Philly" sound in him here and how it also shows up in Grover. Some people don't like to hear that (for any number of reasons), but sorry, there it is. Grover had some Jimmy Heath I him, which is how it should be. Never did get why Fuller was pulled back in the mix with a little extra reverb...somebody made that choice for some reason, no doubt. I just don't get it.  Already ID'd.  The Landmark album is also excellent, but this was the Muse.  I agree about the early 70's being Heath's best years, it crushed me when he went self-consciously retro with his brothers on CBS (who ruined a lot of great jazz musicians on record in that  period,  but let Dexter do his  thing).  Never thought about the Grover connection, will have to listen for that.

TRACK FIVE - Hmmm....sounds really familiar, but maybe just because of overall tendencies rather than specifics...also sounds sorta not fully formed in spots (but just spots), the mix suggests a Black Jazz record, how the horns are pulled back and the Rhodes and bass pushed up front. Is that Harold Vick on here?  Not Black Jazz or Vick.  Reveal will fascinate some people.

TRACK SIX - Billy. That's all I feel like I need to say, because that's really all there is to say. But ok, Mark Masters does good work, check him out too.  Yep.  Already ID'd, and everyone in our neighborhood needs this CD in their collection.

TRACK SEVEN - a 70s Hutch BN with Ramon Morris on flute? Sounds like the flute is intended as the leader, but the band is more interesting to  me. Whoever it is, they paid attention to the mix, that's a good thing to do. And the piece develops nicely. Can't say it blows me away or anything, but it's good, they did what they set out to do and did it well, even that little Manteca thing that the bass line keeps referencing. I might like to hear what this sounds like in context of the entire album  More recent, and flute is the leader.  I really like this album as listening material while I work.

TRACK EIGHT - Mark Masters doing more good work, this time with Grachan and again with Billy. That's another good record.  Yes, previously ID'd and I love this album!

TRACK NINE - This type of thing just sounds silly to me these days.  I enjoy it, but I still listen to Ultimate Spinach and the Strawberry Alarm Clock.  

TRACK TEN - Beach Boys Party gone wrong! Dick Dale & The Ventures break in the room and start pissing on the food, Brian gets his feelings hurt and retreats to write something sensitive, Marilyn feigns anger but does not avert her gaze, people get laid, some now, some later, and sooner or later the cats eat the rest of the food, even the pissed-on stuff. Doesn't sound silly like #9, but I'm not into it, like, how may layers of reference are allowable before it becomes all about the reference, and how much pissed-on food do you have to eat to get the point and form an opinion??  Unlike #9, this one was meant to be silly even when it was recorded, and I was consciously being silly by including it.  And there is one more layer of reference to go, which is why I included it and is what the mindblower is meant to be.

TRACK ELEVEN - Sounds like a Tony band. I like it for the band sound, sounds like a good band, any band that has Tony on drums is going to sound good...but wait, that tenor player is not a toney tenor player, so...what is this? Still sounds like a good band, but if not Tony...hell, Tony sounds great even when it's not Tony.  Already ID'd, and I like the non-Tony Tony rhythm section a lot.  The front line is also a couple of really interesting guys, each in their own way.

TRACK TWELVE - Oh hey, Gil again!  Can't ever have too much Gil.  Ever.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Moody!  Indeed.

Nice mix, thanks!  Thank you for your always fascinating feedback!

 

 

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Nicole Mitchell on #7?

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1 hour ago, JSngry said:

Nicole Mitchell on #7?

Yes!  A recent discovery for me, and I want to hear more of her.  Recommendations sought.

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4 hours ago, felser said:

All of your statements are correct.  Someone will figure this out soon enough given your clues.

I was disappointed by the Santana album which was released right after "Supernatural." Therefore I have not made an effort to listen to any of the Santana albums which were released after that.

 

I still enjoy the first three Santana albums, Caravanserai, Welcome, Blues for Salvador, and individual songs from many other albums. This track strikes me as being in the more generic style which Carlos seems to have adopted for some of his work later on. It would be easy enough to research this with Spotify and ITunes. If I find it first, I will post it.

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2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

I still enjoy the first three Santana albums, Caravanserai, Welcome, Blues for Salvador, and individual songs from many other albums.

Don't sleep in 'Lotus', the 3CD live set with the 'Welcome' band.  I paid big bucks for the Japanese import vinyl in the 70's and didn't regret it, then also bought the 2CD set when it came out in the 90's.

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5 hours ago, felser said:

Don't sleep in 'Lotus', the 3CD live set with the 'Welcome' band.  I paid big bucks for the Japanese import vinyl in the 70's and didn't regret it, then also bought the 2CD set when it came out in the 90's.

I have Lotus on CD. I like that one too.

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  1. Short number with a 70s feel.  Lizz Wright and Cassandra Wilson have a deeper sound.
  2. Definitely Gil Scott-Heron - Peace Go With You Brother from Winter in America.
  3. Sounds like something from McCoy Tyner - Horizon, but without McCoy.  That should mean that this is John Blake.
  4. Feels like Milestone era Sonny Rollins.
  5. Spiritual Jazz with electric piano, likely seventies.  Gary Bartz is a possibility.
  6. Has a Charles Tolliver feel.  Can't quite rule out Woody Shaw either.  Wait, the sax sounds a lot like Billy Harper.  I don't recognize this as being on Love Dance, so I'm going to drop the idea of this being trumpet led and say Billy Harper is the leader.
  7. Seems to be a bit of echo on the flute.  Reminds me of some things I've heard from Matthias Lupri, but the bass has more of a 60s/70s feel.  Like the vibes, more of a Walt Dickerson concept than most vibists, but absolutely not Walt.  I Don't think Roy Ayers ever moved this far toward Spiritual Jazz without being overtly commercial.
  8. Gil Evans is a possibility.  I remember I had three Billy Harper appearances on my first BFT, hmmm ... 
  9. Very Santana.  Almost has to be!  Why don't I know this already?  Love Devotion Surrender?
 10. First thought was the Raybeats, but there have probably been dozens of surf revivalists since then.
 11. Nice and loose.  Didn't figure anything out from the excellent horns, but the drums have a lot to say too.  Maybe this is Elvin Jones.
 12. Gil Scott-Heron is back, with the two versions of this track bookending this BFT like they do the original album - Peace Go With You Brother #2 from Winter in America. 
 13. And a short and lovely piano coda.  I'll guess Frank Kimbrough because it's a little reminiscent of Keith Jarrett but there are no vocal sounds.

...

So now I've gotta know who's playing Vibes with Nicole Mitchell!

 

Edited by randyhersom

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2 hours ago, randyhersom said:

  1. Short number with a 70s feel.  Lizz Wright and Cassandra Wilson have a deeper sound.  I look forward to the reveal on this one.
  2. Definitely Gil Scott-Heron - Peace Go With You Brother from Winter in America.  Absolutely!
  3. Sounds like something from McCoy Tyner - Horizon, but without McCoy.  That should mean that this is John Blake.  But it's not!
  4. Feels like Milestone era Sonny Rollins.  Of that era, but not Milestone or Rollins.
  5. Spiritual Jazz with electric piano, likely seventies.  Gary Bartz is a possibility.  Not Bartz.  People will find this one interesting.
  6. Has a Charles Tolliver feel.  Can't quite rule out Woody Shaw either.  Wait, the sax sounds a lot like Billy Harper.  I don't recognize this as being on Love Dance, so I'm going to drop the idea of this being trumpet led and say Billy Harper is the leader.  Harper, but he's not the leader.  Already ID'd.  Pick up this CD!
  7. Seems to be a bit of echo on the flute.  Reminds me of some things I've heard from Matthias Lupri, but the bass has more of a 60s/70s feel.  Like the vibes, more of a Walt Dickerson concept than most vibists, but absolutely not Walt.  I Don't think Roy Ayers ever moved this far toward Spiritual Jazz without being overtly commercial.  I agree on Ayers, and that's a tragedy.  
  8. Gil Evans is a possibility.  I remember I had three Billy Harper appearances on my first BFT, hmmm ...  Hmmm indeed!  Already ID'd, and yes Harper on it. 
  9. Very Santana.  Almost has to be!  Why don't I know this already?  Love Devotion Surrender?  Santana, but what from when and where!
 10. First thought was the Raybeats, but there have probably been dozens of surf revivalists since then.  But not like this group!
 11. Nice and loose.  Didn't figure anything out from the excellent horns, but the drums have a lot to say too.  Maybe this is Elvin Jones.  Not Jones, but you are right about the drums and horns being really good.
 12. Gil Scott-Heron is back, with the two versions of this track bookending this BFT like they do the original album - Peace Go With You Brother #2 from Winter in America.  Always loved the way these tracks bookended that album, so chose to do it here, as that song is still so timely.
 13. And a short and lovely piano coda.  I'll guess Frank Kimbrough because it's a little reminiscent of Keith Jarrett but there are no vocal sounds.  Not Kimbrough.  Have always regretted Jarrett's grunts or whatever they are.  Remember the great parody about them someone posted several years ago.

...

So now I've gotta know who's playing Vibes with Nicole Mitchell!  Time will tell...

Thanks for your sharp and enjoyable thoughts!

 

 

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The whole BFT was right up my alley.  Unlike JSngry, I loved 9 and liked 10 quite a bit.  Had to cheat on #5 and I will just say whatta band!  

 

Feels great to not be totally clueless on a BFT, Thanks!

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3 hours ago, randyhersom said:

The whole BFT was right up my alley.  Unlike JSngry, I loved 9 and liked 10 quite a bit.  Had to cheat on #5 and I will just say whatta band!  

 

Feels great to not be totally clueless on a BFT, Thanks!

We do have compatible tastes, which I am thankful for.  You scored big points with me when you ID'd Charles Sullivan's "Genesis" on my first-ever BFT!

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Lucky snow day!  I get to do a BFT!

Track 01 - Hmmm... no idea what this is.  I go through periods where I listen to stuff like this (I'm in one right now), but I'm kind of particular about it.  Not sure how this one strikes me.

Track 02 - Rhodes --  I'm in.  A bit freaky on the headphones, but I'm diggin' it.  I kind of feel like this is what Kamisi Washington *wants* to sound like.  This is a great feel and driven by the period (I'm assuming early/mid-70s).  It's neither Gene McDaniels nor Bill Withers, but in the vein of both.  I'm all in on this one.

Track 03 - My first thought was Michael White, but no.  Then I was leaning Billy Bang, but the sideman aren't there.  Seems too pure to be Urbaniak.  I'm now thoroughly confused.  That electric bass is awful but I want to hear more of the violin, and the overall feel is smack on.  I'm in, but I can't ID.

Track 04 - This tune is reminding me of another tune, but I can't place either.  Tough getting old.  This is my ideal quintet setting.  I'd prefer acoustic piano, but if you HAVE to go keys, it HAS to be Rhodes.  Stand-up bass would make me happier, but again, this feel is killin'!  Tenor player is a later guy, but with ties to the hay day.  He's got those lines down, but he ties them together with meaning and he's not afraid of being non-technical.  Sort of like a ballsier Eric Alexander.  Rhythm is spot on or I'd go Jimmy Heath.  Could almost be The Crusaders, except I think the musicianship across the board is a tick higher, and that's a statement.  Man... you are going to cost me MONEY!!!!  Telling my mother-in-law to make it Amazon and iTunes gift cards!  Just when I think I've got most everything I want, you damned guys cost me MONEY!!!! ;)  The tenor reminds me a bit of Fathead, but I say he's newer.  I need this.

Track 05 - Please say that's not sopranino... I mean, I like this, but if it's that, I won't be able to deal.  Nope.  Just the shrillest soprano, ever.  Hence the nickname "the unemployment stick".  I'm all in, in spite of that.  Can't remember the last BFT that hit on all cylinders for me... though, it was probably your last one! ;)   This is clearly a tenor doubler, but which one?  No clue.  Seems too early for this, but I'm going to guess that Oscar Brashear (already been wrong about him once on this test -- more on that later!).  Where ARE all *these* trumpet players!?!?!   Everybody I encounter seems to have consumed the Wynton Kool-aid.  Be brassy, aggressive and proud, damnit!  This is the sort of thing I would sometimes get on the radio as a kid.  I was so cool I'd spend my Friday nights alone, lights out, in my room, stone sober digging this stuff with a Sprite.  Those hyper-compressed drums are a bit off-putting, but otherwise, more money leaving my wallet.  This has a feel very similar to some of Harold Land's 70's stuff, but these guys seem younger than that.

Track 06 - I recognized this tune, instantly, as Is It Not True Simply Because You Cannot Believe It, but also realized I didn't have the version (MORE MONEY!!!!).  Billy Harper was obvious, but I had to sleuth to find it, so I'm not claiming identification, here.  I *did* however, immediately buy it.  Billy remains "my" guy.  I've heard people talk about other musicians who are always "in the moment," for me, that describes Billy to a T.  Ego?  Sure.  Sometimes a bit difficult?  If the stories are true.  Complete bad ass?  AbsoLUTEly!  Always surprised (and a bit grumbly) when I see someone mis-ID'd as him.  To me, he's just so damned unique.  I don't think there is a safer bet than purchasing a Billy Harper album (perhaps excepting Jon & Billy, and Blueprints).  Even the vocal album works.  This was my mistaken Brashear ID (in a PM to Felser). I still do not have a better guess.  I surely wish Billy would put out a book of his tunes.  He had that option advertised on his site about 8 years back, and I contacted him with a list.  Never heard back.  Not sure what the breakdown was, but man, this stuff needs to be PLAYED!  Glad recordings like this and The Cookers are actually making that happen.

Track 07 - Sure sounds like William Parker, right off the bat.  Nope.  Too much production.  Love it, though!.  Man!  What's not to love?  You've got vibes, reverb flute, a bitching groove, tasteful drums (Marc Edwards?).  Man!  Felser!  We gotta HANG!  BITCHIN'!  This is the kind of thing makes me wanna PLAY!  Gotta share this with Tim Webb!  Man... this gets better as it goes!  Could be Khan Jamal.  I could do this all day long... MORE!

Track 08 - Why, hello, Billy.  I was leaning Mike Westbrook's arranging, but that's out the door.  It's not Gil's band.  Not Tolliver.  Unless it is MM, again, it's almost GOT to be Barney McAll.  The feeling of seeing/hearing Billy in person the first time... can't describe it.  Literally nothing else like it.  Chills.  Warmth.  Euphoria.  And that was the bleedin' sound check! (Priestess)  Wait... not McAll... not enough keys.  Gotta be another Mark Masters project.  And, DAMN IT ALL, I don't have it.  GRRR!!!!

Track 09 - Ibrahim meets Santana?  Sure sounds like Carlos.  Literally nothing in this world makes me happier than Latin music.  When anybody hears guitar like this, how do they possibly listen to the shit that's on the radio.  Sad, OJ... sad.  

Track 10 - Tarrentino!  There was a band in these parts playing this sort of stuff (not quite to this level) called The Cadillac Hitmen... they'd arrive at their gigs in this big, red Cadillac El Dorado (I believe).  Then they'd blow your face off with three hours of this stuff.  Oddly, it always worked.  It does so again, here.  Could this possibly be a Zorn project?

Track 11 - Somebody newer, who owes a LOT to Woody Shaw.  The tenor is definitely post-Brecker.  The notes are right, but a bit too clean.  Could be Bergonzi, actually.  I like the trumpet, but I'm unsure how he'd hold up over numerous songs.  He's "studied" his Freddie Hubbard and Woody Shaw, for sure.  Drums are busy, but in a good way -- they're making this work.  Not Gonz.  Out of that school, though.  Not particularly individual, but I'd guess Berklee or NEC.

Track 12 - I'm guessing the same as #2.  Still don't know. Still in.  I want MORE of this.

Track 13 - No idea, but haunting and powerful.  It'll be alright, my brother.

Man... you are spending my MONEY!

 

Good gravy!  How the hell did I miss #8!  On the bright side, I can save a few bucks -- I own it!!!!  

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3 hours ago, tkeith said:

Lucky snow day!  I get to do a BFT!

Track 01 - Hmmm... no idea what this is.  I go through periods where I listen to stuff like this (I'm in one right now), but I'm kind of particular about it.  Not sure how this one strikes me.  This one is very personal for me in some ways, plus the reveal may be fascinating for some.  I count it as a brief indulgence rather than something everyone would necessarily dig.  Same thing with #10 and #13.

Track 02 - Rhodes --  I'm in.  A bit freaky on the headphones, but I'm diggin' it.  I kind of feel like this is what Kamisi Washington *wants* to sound like.  This is a great feel and driven by the period (I'm assuming early/mid-70s).  It's neither Gene McDaniels nor Bill Withers, but in the vein of both.  I'm all in on this one.  Actually surprised you didn't nail this one.  I have it on here more as a pronouncement of my state of mind than any other purpose.  if you aren't already familiar with this guy, welcome to a new amazing world.

Track 03 - My first thought was Michael White, but no.  Then I was leaning Billy Bang, but the sideman aren't there.  Seems too pure to be Urbaniak.  I'm now thoroughly confused.  That electric bass is awful but I want to hear more of the violin, and the overall feel is smack on.  I'm in, but I can't ID.  The sidemen are weak on this,  they aren't really jazz guys.  The bass player has played on records that are in millions of homes.  But I love the violin.

Track 04 - This tune is reminding me of another tune, but I can't place either.  Tough getting old.  This is my ideal quintet setting.  I'd prefer acoustic piano, but if you HAVE to go keys, it HAS to be Rhodes.  Stand-up bass would make me happier, but again, this feel is killin'!  Tenor player is a later guy, but with ties to the hay day.  He's got those lines down, but he ties them together with meaning and he's not afraid of being non-technical.  Sort of like a ballsier Eric Alexander.  Rhythm is spot on or I'd go Jimmy Heath.  Could almost be The Crusaders, except I think the musicianship across the board is a tick higher, and that's a statement.  Man... you are going to cost me MONEY!!!!  Telling my mother-in-law to make it Amazon and iTunes gift cards!  Just when I think I've got most everything I want, you damned guys cost me MONEY!!!! ;)  The tenor reminds me a bit of Fathead, but I say he's newer.  I need this.  We all need  this, and it's unjustly hard to find (I only have it through the kindness of another board member who traded it to me).  You'll find the  reveal very enlightening.

Track 05 - Please say that's not sopranino... I mean, I like this, but if it's that, I won't be able to deal.  Nope.  Just the shrillest soprano, ever.  Hence the nickname "the unemployment stick".  I'm all in, in spite of that.  Can't remember the last BFT that hit on all cylinders for me... though, it was probably your last one! ;)   This is clearly a tenor doubler, but which one?  No clue.  Seems too early for this, but I'm going to guess that Oscar Brashear (already been wrong about him once on this test -- more on that later!).  Where ARE all *these* trumpet players!?!?!   Everybody I encounter seems to have consumed the Wynton Kool-aid.  Be brassy, aggressive and proud, damnit!  This is the sort of thing I would sometimes get on the radio as a kid.  I was so cool I'd spend my Friday nights alone, lights out, in my room, stone sober digging this stuff with a Sprite.  Those hyper-compressed drums are a bit off-putting, but otherwise, more money leaving my wallet.  This has a feel very similar to some of Harold Land's 70's stuff, but these guys seem younger than that.  We had similar Friday nights except mine was root beer.  The sax guy is someone you are familiar with, but he's not well known.   You are so right about trumpet players.  

Track 06 - I recognized this tune, instantly, as Is It Not True Simply Because You Cannot Believe It, but also realized I didn't have the version (MORE MONEY!!!!).  Billy Harper was obvious, but I had to sleuth to find it, so I'm not claiming identification, here.  I *did* however, immediately buy it.  Billy remains "my" guy.  I've heard people talk about other musicians who are always "in the moment," for me, that describes Billy to a T.  Ego?  Sure.  Sometimes a bit difficult?  If the stories are true.  Complete bad ass?  AbsoLUTEly!  Always surprised (and a bit grumbly) when I see someone mis-ID'd as him.  To me, he's just so damned unique.  I don't think there is a safer bet than purchasing a Billy Harper album (perhaps excepting Jon & Billy, and Blueprints).  Even the vocal album works.  This was my mistaken Brashear ID (in a PM to Felser). I still do not have a better guess.  I surely wish Billy would put out a book of his tunes.  He had that option advertised on his site about 8 years back, and I contacted him with a list.  Never heard back.  Not sure what the breakdown was, but man, this stuff needs to be PLAYED!  Glad recordings like this and The Cookers are actually making that happen.  Per my avatar, he's my guy,  too.  No one ahead of him in terms of bringing joy through music to me.  I saw him live with Max Roach at Keystone Korner in the 70's. but the great experience was seeing him with his own group at the Painted Bride Art Center here in Philly in the early 90's.  Will never forget it.  Be sure to pick up the "Live in Poland" DVD if you don't already have it.  Amazing how well you and I click musically ("Effi" being another example).

Track 07 - Sure sounds like William Parker, right off the bat.  Nope.  Too much production.  Love it, though!.  Man!  What's not to love?  You've got vibes, reverb flute, a bitching groove, tasteful drums (Marc Edwards?).  Man!  Felser!  We gotta HANG!  BITCHIN'!  This is the kind of thing makes me wanna PLAY!  Gotta share this with Tim Webb!  Man... this gets better as it goes!  Could be Khan Jamal.  I could do this all day long... MORE!  We do gotta hang.  Gotta get up your way some summer.  I love Khan Jamal's music,  but this isn't him.  This was one of my great new discoveries of 2016 (though the recording is older).

Track 08 - Why, hello, Billy.  I was leaning Mike Westbrook's arranging, but that's out the door.  It's not Gil's band.  Not Tolliver.  Unless it is MM, again, it's almost GOT to be Barney McAll.  The feeling of seeing/hearing Billy in person the first time... can't describe it.  Literally nothing else like it.  Chills.  Warmth.  Euphoria.  And that was the bleedin' sound check! (Priestess)  Wait... not McAll... not enough keys.  Gotta be another Mark Masters project.  And, DAMN IT ALL, I don't have it.  GRRR!!!!  Already ID'd, great great album.  Please let me know more about Barney McAll, not familar with him and sounds like I need to be!

Track 09 - Ibrahim meets Santana?  Sure sounds like Carlos.  Literally nothing in this world makes me happier than Latin music.  When anybody hears guitar like this, how do they possibly listen to the shit that's on the radio.  Sad, OJ... sad.  This really should be all over the radio.  Right now.  

Track 10 - Tarrentino!  There was a band in these parts playing this sort of stuff (not quite to this level) called The Cadillac Hitmen... they'd arrive at their gigs in this big, red Cadillac El Dorado (I believe).  Then they'd blow your face off with three hours of this stuff.  Oddly, it always worked.  It does so again, here.  Could this possibly be a Zorn project?  Long long way from a Zorn project.  This ID should melt some minds.

Track 11 - Somebody newer, who owes a LOT to Woody Shaw.  The tenor is definitely post-Brecker.  The notes are right, but a bit too clean.  Could be Bergonzi, actually.  I like the trumpet, but I'm unsure how he'd hold up over numerous songs.  He's "studied" his Freddie Hubbard and Woody Shaw, for sure.  Drums are busy, but in a good way -- they're making this work.  Not Gonz.  Out of that school, though.  Not particularly individual, but I'd guess Berklee or NEC.  Trumpet has done more than studied Hubbard, and he holds up great over numerous songs..  Attended North Texas State, same school that gave us Billy Harper!

Track 12 - I'm guessing the same as #2.  Still don't know. Still in.  I want MORE of this. Yes you do!  See me for recommendations.

Track 13 - No idea, but haunting and powerful.  It'll be alright, my brother.  Yes, praying it will be.

Man... you are spending my MONEY!  Friends don't let friends keep their money when there is great music to be discovered.  You can't take it with you!

 

Good gravy!  How the hell did I miss #8!  On the bright side, I can save a few bucks -- I own it!!!!  

 

Edited by felser

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I have found Track 9. It is "Echizo" from the 2016 album, "Santana IV".

 

Santana_IV_%28Front_Cover%29.png

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3 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

I have found Track 9. It is "Echizo" from the 2016 album, "Santana IV".

 

Santana_IV_%28Front_Cover%29.png

Yessir  Very good album as long as you don't really listen to the lyrics.  Summary:    No ID on cuts 1,5,10,13    Partial ID on cuts 3,7.  . Full ID's made on cuts 2,4,6,8,9,11,12.

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That is an interesting comment on "Santana IV." I have read that it is a reunion of the band that recorded "Santana III", of the members who are alive or available. It has received mixed reviews. I have not heard it yet, except for this cut.

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I find it embarrassing to listen to 69 year old Gregg Rolie coming on like a horny 19 year old in "Shake It" and "Anywhere You Want to Go", but the album sounds great in the background, and everyone plays really well.  

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I have been thinking about your opening question about the Cowsills album. I have read in Offbeat magazine, the local New Orleans music magazine, that Susan Cowsill has performed as a well received solo artist there in recent years. Is the artist on Track 1 Susan Cowsill?

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2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

I have been thinking about your opening question about the Cowsills album. I have read in Offbeat magazine, the local New Orleans music magazine, that Susan Cowsill has performed as a well received solo artist there in recent years. Is the artist on Track 1 Susan Cowsill?

Yep, sure is, excellent  sleuthing!.  I think she's great.  That should give you good clues into the other bonus question.

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and to track 13.  Here is a link to Cowsill's exquisite "Crescent City Snow", about the recovery from Hurricane Katrina.

 

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That is a very interesting choice for a Blindfold Test! I had always wondered what she sounded like, after reading about her in Offbeat magazine.

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I late to the party, I see the three I knew have been answered already. Track 2,track 4 and track 9.  Track 8, no mistaking Billy Harper's tenor. I don't know this one. Track 12 more of track 2. 

I enjoyed all 13 tracks. 

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On ‎12‎/‎6‎/‎2016 at 5:08 PM, randyhersom said:

  1. Short number with a 70s feel.  Lizz Wright and Cassandra Wilson have a deeper sound.
  2. Definitely Gil Scott-Heron - Peace Go With You Brother from Winter in America.
  3. Sounds like something from McCoy Tyner - Horizon, but without McCoy.  That should mean that this is John Blake.
  4. Feels like Milestone era Sonny Rollins.
  5. Spiritual Jazz with electric piano, likely seventies.  Gary Bartz is a possibility.
  6. Has a Charles Tolliver feel.  Can't quite rule out Woody Shaw either.  Wait, the sax sounds a lot like Billy Harper.  I don't recognize this as being on Love Dance, so I'm going to drop the idea of this being trumpet led and say Billy Harper is the leader.
  7. Seems to be a bit of echo on the flute.  Reminds me of some things I've heard from Matthias Lupri, but the bass has more of a 60s/70s feel.  Like the vibes, more of a Walt Dickerson concept than most vibists, but absolutely not Walt.  I Don't think Roy Ayers ever moved this far toward Spiritual Jazz without being overtly commercial.
  8. Gil Evans is a possibility.  I remember I had three Billy Harper appearances on my first BFT, hmmm ... 
  9. Very Santana.  Almost has to be!  Why don't I know this already?  Love Devotion Surrender?
 10. First thought was the Raybeats, but there have probably been dozens of surf revivalists since then.
 11. Nice and loose.  Didn't figure anything out from the excellent horns, but the drums have a lot to say too.  Maybe this is Elvin Jones.
 12. Gil Scott-Heron is back, with the two versions of this track bookending this BFT like they do the original album - Peace Go With You Brother #2 from Winter in America. 
 13. And a short and lovely piano coda.  I'll guess Frank Kimbrough because it's a little reminiscent of Keith Jarrett but there are no vocal sounds.

...

So now I've gotta know who's playing Vibes with Nicole Mitchell!

 

Randy, I have sent you a Private Message. You are scheduled to present the August, 2017, Blindfold Test. If you could read my message and reply, I would appreciate it.--Bill

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