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Dan Gould

BFT 155 Sign Up & Discussion

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Your attention, please. Now batting for Mike Weil, Daniel Gould. GOULD. </Sheppard>

Always wanted to get a Yankee Stadium introduction. :g

Post here if you need a burn though I think its been ages for that to have been requested. As long as Thom is able to make the latest aggregation (13 tracks, 90 minutes or so) publicly available the fun will start Feb 1.

Edit to add the linky-dink:

http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

Edited by Dan Gould

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Thank you Dan for filling in on short notice  when mikeweil had some computer problems. We hope mikeweil can present a BFT later in the year.

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"Gould's prodigious natural power will play well with the jet stream that blows out to right-center field here at The Stadium.  Expect him to be a feared pinch-hitter here in the  mold of Bob Cerv or Johnny Blanchard".

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453beb558672b05b99b8e7551f4f8ca0.jpg

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God you guys are old. If you want to talk feared pinch hitters with a sweet left-handed power stroke I was hoping to hear "Bernie Carbo". :g 

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1966-topps-112-manny-mota-baseball-card-

That is who I think of, when I think of a pinch hitter.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Well sure. But I'd be happy to be remembered for one sweet swing in the '75 series, game 6.

OTOH this BFT could turn out to be a swing and a miss, and you can call me Steve Balboni.

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tumblr_inline_nuqd4d9Ol01r9qiw6_540.jpg

 

dolan.jpg

Pinch Hitters keeps us from hunger, no matter our religion, as long as we are New Yorkers!

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Image result for smoky burgess

Image result for jerry lynch

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Jerry Lynch may have been the best pinch hitter of all.

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16 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Jerry Lynch may have been the best pinch hitter of all.


As far as I know, his 1961 was the greatest pinch hitting season by a player ever.

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Up, as the link is now added to the first post. Play ball!

"Pitcher winds and delivers ... starts him off with an Eephus?!"

 

:g

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Let 'er Rip!

Image result for rip sewell

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I can only hope that I hit the eephus as well as Ted Williams did.

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I was thinking Tony Perez v. Bill Lee but, yeah. :g

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I know one of the songs. Song 3 is by the Archie Shepp and Horace Parlan duo, from the Trouble in Mind album on the Steeplechase label. This song is When Things Go Wrong from that album.

Your Blindfold Test is a consistently mainstream, swinging one. I like it. I will keep listening and trying to guess who is playing.

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2 hours ago, Mary6170 said:

I know one of the songs. Song 3 is by the Archie Shepp and Horace Parlan duo, from the Trouble in Mind album on the Steeplechase label. This song is When Things Go Wrong from that album.

Your Blindfold Test is a consistently mainstream, swinging one. I like it. I will keep listening and trying to guess who is playing.

Nice start on your first BFT, Mary! I'm glad you've enjoyed the music.

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Dan, I always look forward to your Blindfold Teats because they are a guaranteed fun listen. This one is like your past BFTs in that it makes me realize how poor I am at identifying bop tenor and alto sax players. 

I have that Archie Shepp/Horace Parlan album but did not remember the song. I have not played that album and the other Shepp/Parlance duet album, "Goin' Home," in some time. I think I should remedy that!

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Well it's a near miracle but I have actually identified one of the songs from my music collection. Track #11 is Bertha Hope: "Low Tide," the opening track on her "Elmo's Fire" album, her 1994 Steeplechase album.

IMG_0876.JPG

Edited by Hot Ptah

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   1.  Is it alto or tenor?  Leaning toward tenor.  Maybe Zoot Sims?
   2.  I'll guess Black and Blue for the label, not that helps too much.  Maybe Illinois Jacquet.
   3.  Reminds me a little of the Al Cohn/Jimmy Rowles date on Xanadu, Heavy Love. 
   4.  Jaws and Griff?
   5.  Definitely Alto.  Could be Hodges.  The little Hah from the piano player makes me think so even more, even though I don't know of them recording without another horn.  Oh, look, another horn, bone.
   6.  More live Black and Blue vibe.  Maybe Sonny Stitt?
   7.  Stanley Turrentine with the Three Sounds, Willow Weep for me.
   8.  I'll guess Kenny Burrell without much conviction.
   9.  I'll guess Barry Harris for the speed and crispness.
  10.  Electric Bass! Early Woody Shaw?
  11.  Farmer-Golson Jazztet? Nah, I think they always had a bone, and the the drum fills are shouting Art to me, so Jazz Messengers.
  12.  Bluesier than #9. Dan Gould would definitely play Gene Harris twice.  Three Sounds?
  13.  This has more of a groove band feel than most Jimmy Smith I have heard.  Maybe Milt Buckner?
 

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2 hours ago, randyhersom said:

   1.  Is it alto or tenor?  Leaning toward tenor.  Maybe Zoot Sims?
   2.  I'll guess Black and Blue for the label, not that helps too much.  Maybe Illinois Jacquet.
   3.  Reminds me a little of the Al Cohn/Jimmy Rowles date on Xanadu, Heavy Love. 
   4.  Jaws and Griff?
   5.  Definitely Alto.  Could be Hodges.  The little Hah from the piano player makes me think so even more, even though I don't know of them recording without another horn.  Oh, look, another horn, bone.
   6.  More live Black and Blue vibe.  Maybe Sonny Stitt?
   7.  Stanley Turrentine with the Three Sounds, Willow Weep for me.
   8.  I'll guess Kenny Burrell without much conviction.
   9.  I'll guess Barry Harris for the speed and crispness.
  10.  Electric Bass! Early Woody Shaw?
  11.  Farmer-Golson Jazztet? Nah, I think they always had a bone, and the the drum fills are shouting Art to me, so Jazz Messengers.
  12.  Bluesier than #9. Dan Gould would definitely play Gene Harris twice.  Three Sounds?
  13.  This has more of a groove band feel than most Jimmy Smith I have heard.  Maybe Milt Buckner?
 

Thanks Randy but none of your guesses are accurate. You may have checked the thread and found that #3 and #11 have been identified (nice job, HP) (and not sure why you thought Messengers or Jazztet with no sax in sight, just trumpet and 'bone). 

Also while Gene is in there (how could he not be) you did not find his slot yet.

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Track 4

Ben Webster

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1 hour ago, BillF said:

Track 4

Ben Webster

Yes but from which recording/who is that other saxophonist?

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Oh wow that is actually Ben Webster? I thought it was a saxophonist very influenced by Ben Webster, but I did not imagine that it was actually Ben!

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Super Bowl Sunday, the usual facts and disclaimers set in Roman Numerals, let's play!

TRACK ONE - I liked the alto player a lot at first, but less as it went on. Seems like it got more Phil Woodsy. And Woodsier. To the point that it moved from shared influence to outright copying. But very fluent player, really speaking the language, and the rhythm section is in it. Apart from the Woods things, I liked the spunk and full-frontal approach.

TRACK TWO - Scott Hamilton? The tune is maybe familiar? Like one of those "swing-to-bop" type things. I can't get with the chink-chink-chink-chink thing that the guitar (are there two, btw?) seems to favor. But otoh, everybody's playing. If I was walking past, I'd stop in and have a drink. After that, no promises, but hey, they got me for the one.

TRACK THREE - Shepp/Parlan. I'm guessing that Dan came for Parlan, stayed for Parlan, but was not unhappy with Shepp, right? For me, Shepp is great when he's great, boring as hell when he's not, but when he finds the right "dramatic" platform, he's exquisite. And I think he's exquisite here. Horace Parlan is Horace Parlan, so yeah, guaranteed.

TRACK FOUR - That's Ben doing "Johnny Come Lately". One can never hear too much Ben, no matter who else is with him. This is a good rhythm section, but that alto player...no thanks. My guess is that it's this: https://www.dustygroove.com/item/812424/Ben-Webster:Ben-Webster-Meets-Piet-Noodrijk-Johnny-Come-Lately-Live-In-Groningen-1973

TRACK FIVE - That's one of those songs you want to get rid of, but when the time comes, you just can't. "Please don't talk about me when I'm gone". I like this alto playing, the tone, the phrasing, that tarty vibrato that never goes overboard, too corny to be hip and at the same time to hip to be corny. I like a motherfucker who refuses to take sides! I like the trombone too. This sounds like something I've heard coming out of the Dick Gibson Jazz Parties, very un-self-conscious. OH SHIT - This tenor player sounds like ROSCOE MITCHELL!!!! Is it Al Cohn? I mean, that might be the most unintentionally non-sequiturish thing I've ever posted, but the thuddy, overblown attack (all on purpose, of cours), it sounds like Roscoe. And Al. I could be persuaded to but this record if it's all this good. And listen to the rhythm guitar behind the trumpet. ching-ching-ching-ching, not chink-chink-chink-chink lie the other guy. One is a plush carpet, the other's  a slasher film. I very much like how everybod's on the same page here. Not just on the same page, but reading at the same pace.

TRACK SIX - "Broadway", sounds like a private recording. That first guy REALLY sounds like Buddy Tate. The second, kinda like Zoot, but not really...sorta non-descript. Picks up after a while, because Buddy Tate kinda forces the issue!

TRACK SEVEN - King Curtis. Took me a little while to figure it out, mainly because of the vibrato, but then he hit one of those high notes, and yep. This is beautiful. "Caressing a melody" is such a cliche, but that's what he's doing here, caressing it, tickling it, giving it a little pinch, a little nibble, a little lick, a littel push, a little pull, you know, sexing it.And he knows you're watching.

TRACK EIGHT - "Sister Sadie", by some heavy-ass toned, guitarist. Somebody who's heard Tiny Grimes and paid attention to the finer points. But then there's that hillbilly stuff in there...Lenny Breau? Not feeling that drummer, sorry. If I was passing by, I might stand outside for a few minutes, might not go in for a drink, depends on the waitresses. So take notes, kids, take the gig at the joint with the cutest waitresses. Don't ask why, ok, just do it.

TRACK NINE - Marvin & Johnny would be the ones to answer this question. But they're not here, so I'll go with Gene & The 3 Sounds. I swear to god, this guy always walks right up to the very edge of Oscar Peterson bullshittery and never, never crosses over, I love him for that. That, and that this was one helluva good band, a real trio. There were arrangements, sometimes overt, sometimes subtle, but it was a group effort, always. Hell, I'd have a drink or two, even if there were no waitresses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_There_(album)

TRACK TEN - Was this sourced from a cassette? Not at all opposed to these "type of thing", but this specific example...not doing too much for me. Maybe it's the drumming. There's no breath in the time.

TRACK ELEVEN - And now, for something completely different..

TRACK TWELVE - "Moten Swing". I like this. It's oddly Brubeck-ian, yet curiously Hines-ly, a pungent bouquet with an iridescent finish...I'll take a case, please, of gallons, if you have them. That's some Secret Society Sauce, nobody gonna play like that unless they KNOW something.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Bill Dogget? Billy Butler? Bubba Brooks? No matter...we can effectively play the "eventually it all starts to sound the same" card here, but we can also play the "well, not really" card every bit as better, and that's the one I'll play here, because of details, little details. So, card played. I like it.

Again, a very consistent presentation, much to enjoy, nothing to wholly abhor. For free tunes, hey, ain't a better deal to be had, right?

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