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Dan Gould

BFT 155 Sign Up & Discussion

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17 hours ago, tkeith said:

Sorry guys.  Been only semi-online (in terms of my routine).  It was a clerical glitch that shut my domain down.  Should be up and running now.  (And now, I will receive my slew of backlogged e-mails).  Haven't listened, yet, so I haven't been checking this thread.  We should be back up and running.  Thanks for the heads up, Bill.

Oh, and Dan, I'm recovering with minor setbacks (swelling, fair amount of pain).  Getting old royally sucks.

Thanks Thom.

Power's been restored at the Yard, folks:  PLAY BALL!

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Welp, once again, Dan shows me a bunch of stuff I've never heard. :D

Track 1 - Recording is clipping something fierce on my laptop speakers (like, every drum kick).  Something about this alto player chafes me.  S/he does something a lot of the modern players due, which, to my ear, is trying to do too much with a note.  There's so much expressonatin' going on that they lose the beauty of a simple held note.  I know I seem to be in the minority on this, but there is some... not open, but it's hard to describe otherwise, quality to the tone that is just killing this for me.  Player seems so focused on achieving that affect that his/her time seems off to me.  Drum breaks are clipping almost non-stop.  Something a bit Louis Bellson about the drums in terms of attack, but the time and feel are all wrong for Belson.  Alto almost sounds to me like a blues player playing jazz.  Nothing "wrong" here, just isn't clicking for me.  Maybe late Louis Jordan?

Track 2 - At first, I thought it might be Lockjaw, but the tone is too clean.  It's not somebody I could identify with confidence, but someone out of that Prysock section of town would be my guess.  I like the general feel of this one and, as opposed to the first track, this tenor player is entirely locked in.

Track 3 - ARCHIE!!!!  One of the later Parlan duets (meaning after Goin' Home).  Based on Archie's sound/playing, I'd guess '80/'81.  Still fiery and brutal, but not quite that cutting edge he had in the late '70s.

Track 4 - That's Ben.  I know the song, but I suck so bad I can't get the title.  Something from Sir Duke, if I'm not mistaken.  Is that Arthur Blythe?!  Sounds very much like the alto is dubbed in after the fact.  Ben is vicious (LOVIN' it!).  Okay, not Arthur.  Man, THAT would have been a trip!  This could actually be the same alto player from track 1, on a better day. Still, to my ear lends credence to the idea that this is not a "jazz" guy, but a guy playing Jazz.

Track 5 - Alto player is working awfully hard, but I'm not really feeling it.  Seems too grunty to be Norris Turney, but that's the first place my mind went.  I want this to work better than it does.  Concord Jazz recording?  Yeah, so that tenor player doesn't work for me at all.  Trips over his tongue... like Quinichette with a head cold... not feeling this guy at all.  Even when he gets going, it's like he's totally fighting the horn.  Can't tell if he's really old, really sick, or really bad, but not digging him at all.  Seems like it wants to be JATP, but more like JATP if the regular guys didn't show.  That's what it is -- seems like a regional/local date.  They mean it, but they're not quite cutting it.  I feel bad kicking it this hard, but it just doesn't resonate.

Track 6 - Broadway.  Dex will always own this tune for me.  First guy has that KC sound to me.  Almost like Buddy Tate, but doesn't seem to have the ass of Buddy's playing.  I like this just fine, though.  Drummer is familiar, but seems to be doing too much hear.  Second tenor could be Budd Johnson.  Both these guys are for real.  Guitar player does not belong on that stage.  

Track 7 - I'm guessing this is the Gene Harris track. :D  Willow Weeping, correctly.  When he first goes into the solo, I wondered for a second if it was David Murray.  Kind of like the horn can't handle his aggression.  Clearly not David, but I like this a lot.  Seems like it's a guy just off my radar, but I've definitely heard him before.

Track 8 - Gah!  Horace Silver tune... I can hear Dee Dee singing it, but I can't hear the lyric.  Damnit!  This is another track where the drum kicks are all clipping.  Seems like most of these have been needle drops, but maybe were transferred a bit hot.  Kind of didn't hold my interest.  Nothing wrong with it, I'm just apathetic towards it.

Track 9 -  Billy Boy!  Has a Blakey feel to it, though the block chords are certainly an homage to Red.  At first I was hoping this was an alternate take I was not familiar with, but it's not that.  Something in that left hand *almost* has me thinking Jimmy Jones, but it's not quite right.  And, it's not Blakey.  This one's going to bug me.  Maybe the second best track on this BFT, so far.

Track 10 - Now this is a nice way to switch things up.  That very late-70s feel to it.  Open chords and a 12/8 feel, I'm a sucker for that combo.  Like the 'bone a lot.  No guesses, but this is a keeper.

Track 11 - Hmmm... I was going to say Terry Clarke on drums, but there's Junior Cook on tenor, so I'll say Louis Hayes on drums.  I always love me some Junior.  This one is striking me as a nice, middle-of-the-road track.  It's probably not the best cut on the album, but it's certainly listenable.  There's one Louis record I have buried somewhere in my collection from around 1977.  This could certainly be that.

Track 12 - This one is clipping on the drum hits, too.  Moten Swing.  Not sure who by.  

Track 13 - Sounds like a mix between a Horace Silver tune and Nat Adderley's Work Song.  That sure sounds like Gator.   

This one sits weird with me because what I liked, I REALLY liked.  What I didn't, well... I didn't.  Weird to be so divergent on one test.  What is weirder is that you seemed to have a pretty tight focus on your theme.  Perhaps I should try some pain meds (cold turkey 5 days ago) and give it another listen... or not. ;)  Thanks, Dan!

Man, REALLY sorry I missed the pinch hitter portion of the thread.  How DARE you guys leave THIS guy out!?!?!?!

gutierrezjulio-img600x565-78cardinals.jp

Little known piece of useless information:  This card marks one of the rare times where Topps used the same photo for two consecutive years (1977 and this one from 1978).

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1 hour ago, tkeith said:

Welp, once again, Dan shows me a bunch of stuff I've never heard. :D

Track 1 - Recording is clipping something fierce on my laptop speakers (like, every drum kick).  Something about this alto player chafes me.  S/he does something a lot of the modern players due, which, to my ear, is trying to do too much with a note.  There's so much expressonatin' going on that they lose the beauty of a simple held note.  I know I seem to be in the minority on this, but there is some... not open, but it's hard to describe otherwise, quality to the tone that is just killing this for me.  Player seems so focused on achieving that affect that his/her time seems off to me.  Drum breaks are clipping almost non-stop.  Something a bit Louis Bellson about the drums in terms of attack, but the time and feel are all wrong for Belson.  Alto almost sounds to me like a blues player playing jazz.  Nothing "wrong" here, just isn't clicking for me.  Maybe late Louis Jordan?

Definitely not a modern player and not late Louis Jordan. But Jordan's era was a portion of his heyday. Might be too much of a hint there.

Track 4 - That's Ben.  I know the song, but I suck so bad I can't get the title.  Something from Sir Duke, if I'm not mistaken.  Is that Arthur Blythe?!  Sounds very much like the alto is dubbed in after the fact.  Ben is vicious (LOVIN' it!).  Okay, not Arthur.  Man, THAT would have been a trip!  This could actually be the same alto player from track 1, on a better day. Still, to my ear lends credence to the idea that this is not a "jazz" guy, but a guy playing Jazz.

I trust you've read the rest of the thread - it is Ben and a European player who played free, straightahead, and studio gigs from what I gather. He invited himself onto Ben's stage; this was recorded months before he died.

Track 5 - Alto player is working awfully hard, but I'm not really feeling it.  Seems too grunty to be Norris Turney, but that's the first place my mind went.  I want this to work better than it does.  Concord Jazz recording?  Yeah, so that tenor player doesn't work for me at all.  Trips over his tongue... like Quinichette with a head cold... not feeling this guy at all.  Even when he gets going, it's like he's totally fighting the horn.  Can't tell if he's really old, really sick, or really bad, but not digging him at all.  Seems like it wants to be JATP, but more like JATP if the regular guys didn't show.  That's what it is -- seems like a regional/local date.  They mean it, but they're not quite cutting it.  I feel bad kicking it this hard, but it just doesn't resonate.

Like with Mr. Sangrey its always interesting to hear musician's make judgments like these. Suffice to say this is not a regional/local band. A definite all-star group, but it didn't work for you and Jim R. hated the guitarist, so go figure.

Track 6 - Broadway.  Dex will always own this tune for me.  First guy has that KC sound to me.  Almost like Buddy Tate, but doesn't seem to have the ass of Buddy's playing.  I like this just fine, though.  Drummer is familiar, but seems to be doing too much hear.  Second tenor could be Budd Johnson.  Both these guys are for real.  Guitar player does not belong on that stage.  

Buddy Tate is correct on tenor one. Guitarist is again very well-regarded.

Track 7 - I'm guessing this is the Gene Harris track. :D  Willow Weeping, correctly.  When he first goes into the solo, I wondered for a second if it was David Murray.  Kind of like the horn can't handle his aggression.  Clearly not David, but I like this a lot.  Seems like it's a guy just off my radar, but I've definitely heard him before.

I assume you saw Jim's ID of this though he didn't tell us what date. I programmed this to go with another track that got left off and honestly I didn't even think of the Harris/Turrentine connection to this track or of it as a faux-Gene cut, but that tripped up another participant too. :g

Track 9 -  Billy Boy!  Has a Blakey feel to it, though the block chords are certainly an homage to Red.  At first I was hoping this was an alternate take I was not familiar with, but it's not that.  Something in that left hand *almost* has me thinking Jimmy Jones, but it's not quite right.  And, it's not Blakey.  This one's going to bug me.  Maybe the second best track on this BFT, so far.

Glad you liked this so much! Jim got this one. Gene didn't just play the blues, you know.

Track 10 - Now this is a nice way to switch things up.  That very late-70s feel to it.  Open chords and a 12/8 feel, I'm a sucker for that combo.  Like the 'bone a lot.  No guesses, but this is a keeper.

First to like this track, yippee!

Track 11 - Hmmm... I was going to say Terry Clarke on drums, but there's Junior Cook on tenor, so I'll say Louis Hayes on drums.  I always love me some Junior.  This one is striking me as a nice, middle-of-the-road track.  It's probably not the best cut on the album, but it's certainly listenable.  There's one Louis record I have buried somewhere in my collection from around 1977.  This could certainly be that.

Yes to Junior Cook. Jim got this one.

This one sits weird with me because what I liked, I REALLY liked.  What I didn't, well... I didn't.  Weird to be so divergent on one test.  What is weirder is that you seemed to have a pretty tight focus on your theme.  Perhaps I should try some pain meds (cold turkey 5 days ago) and give it another listen... or not. ;)  Thanks, Dan!

Thanks Thom for all your thoughts!




Little known piece of useless information:  This card marks one of the rare times where Topps used the same photo for two consecutive years (1977 and this one from 1978).

 

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2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 6 - Broadway.  Dex will always own this tune for me.  First guy has that KC sound to me.  Almost like Buddy Tate, but doesn't seem to have the ass of Buddy's playing.  I like this just fine, though.  Drummer is familiar, but seems to be doing too much hear.  Second tenor could be Budd Johnson.  Both these guys are for real.  Guitar player does not belong on that stage.

I've been listening kind of haphazardly, and just got around to #6.  Agree with Thom about the drummer (and about loving Dexter's version).  The sound quality on this is distracting enough that it might be a bit unfair to judge certain aspects of this (like tone creation!), but it sure seems to lack much of a pocket, and I think I'm being pretty kind.  The guitar player also seems to be trying too hard, especially with regard to creating rhythmic tension with his comping.  His solo doesn't do much for me either, although there are a couple of phrases where he seems to be invoking the spirit of Grant Green.  He sort of succeeds, which is okay and kind of fun, but... I'd rather listen to Grant Green.

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Just listened to track 8 again, and liked it a bit better than the first time I'd played it.  Still puzzling over who the guitarist might be.  An interesting combination of sophisticated chops and a sort of loose, down-home feel.  Tone-wise, it doesn't really grab me.  Melvin Sparks, perhaps?

Edited by Jim R

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6 hours ago, Jim R said:

Just listened to track 8 again, and liked it a bit better than the first time I'd played it.  Still puzzling over who the guitarist might be.  An interesting combination of sophisticated chops and a sort of loose, down-home feel.  Tone-wise, it doesn't really grab me.  Melvin Sparks, perhaps?

Not Sparks.

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Three pages of responses already. I haven't look yet at the other answers. Here are my feeble guesses. Although I do know a few since I have the recordings.

1. No idea yet

 

2. No idea yet

 

3. I have the CD, in face all of Shepp and Parlan’s CD. Shepp and Parlan.

 

4. Is this Ben Webster.  Don’t know who the other sax player is. I don’t recognize the playing.

 

5. Like the tune please don’t talk about me. Don’t know who this is.

 

6. Don’t know.

 

7. Willow Weep For me King Curtis. I have this CD.Soul Meeting

8. Horace Silver's Sister Sadie. Don't know who it is.

9. Gene Harris/3 Sounds. I need to listen to my 3 Sounds records to find which one this is from. I knew there had to be a Gene Harris on this somewhere. :)

10. Don't know.

11. Don't know.

12. Don't know

13. Don't know. 

Nice set of music in this BFT. Now I will look at the other replies. 

 

 

Edit

# 8. More than likely it isn't him, but is it Joe Pass? I have a recording of him playing this some with a trio or quartet. I can't find the CD now to see if it is him.

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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Congrats to Tom for ID-ing the source of the King Curtis track ... but no it's not Joe Pass on the Horace Silver tune.

Glad you liked the comp.

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BFT155

I haven’t even looked at my e-mails for over 3 weeks, so I was glad I did today and finding a note about this BFT. I was so keen, I opened it up directly after dinner.

1:1 Bebop line by alto player with a somewhat unattractive sound. Pity about the sound because it means I have to listen to what he’s playing rather than the sound of his sax, which is always a bit of a chore for someone who doesn’t really like jazz all that much. Well, it sez it’s eight minutes and, after four, that’s kind of enough bebop for me to tolerate this evening. (I definitely feel crankier than I used to, nowadays.) Well, he’s sounding a mite better on his second solo and ‘tis pity he didn’t start off like that. I’d have been better disposed towards him, if he had. Oh well, that’s life, I guess.

1:2 I’m a good bit better disposed towards this geezer, whoever he is, despite it being more bebop, as he’s got a fairly nice sound, like there’s something actually IN that sax than air. A fair few Jug licks coming in, which help too. But I still don’t really like this enough to try to think who it might be, except he’s probably a newish player.

1:3 Oh, bloomin’ ‘eck Tucker! I’d like this to be Budd Johnson or Buddy Tate, but I think it’s probably neither. Oh hell, I want this like CRAZY! This is REAL music. Jeez!

1:4 Live. Oh, I think I know this tenor player and the tune. Definitely don’t know the recording. Another one I feel almost immediately that I should have. Mind you, I’m not looking forward to that horrid-sounding alto’s solo, unless he’s putting it on for the obligato. Mucho applause, well merited. So here’s the alto player and it ain’t Benny Carter or Lou Donaldson. It’s someone like Jackie McLean, whom I don’t like at all. But he WAS putting that weird sound on earlier. And he’s a lot more inventive than McLean. I could probably live with his playing, as it’s pretty entertaining.

I’m getting a strong feeling that these guys are putting this stuff on and it’s not their natural way of playing.

Well, we’re on the pianist now, and he’s kinda just playing the piano, know what I mean?

Now the drums, the drums. Fortunately, not followed by a bass solo.

Well, if I were there, I’d probably enjoy this more than I actually did.

1:5 Another long one. Oh, this sounds like Sonny Stitt. ‘Please don’t talk about me when I’m gone’, a tune that jazz musicians seem to have forgotten about. And it AIN’T Stitt. Nice sound, though.

Trombonist has a nice sound, too. Well, it’s really nice. And he played nice sensible stuff. On to the tenorman. Pop goes the weasel – someone’s gonna say it’s Fred Jackson J

So a guitar. And someone who sounds like one of the JATP perennials, shoved in there to make up the numbers and justify a high gate charge.

And now a trumpeter. Yes, SO much like a JATP job, this. We’ve obviously got Oscar to come. Well, just to prove it, it’s not Oscar. Still, I don’t suppose he had an absolute monopoly on JATP gigs. I wonder what they’d have sounded if Gene Harris HAD been in the band?

1:6 More live. ‘Broadway’. To be frank, I’m finding, on the third live cut, this is all sounding like what a former lady colleague used to call jazz wanking, not without justification, I feel. Really looking forward to 7 in a minute.

1:7 ‘Willow weep for me’ played REALLY nicely. And I think I might have this. Oh yes, as it goes along, I’m SURE I have it. I think it’s King Curtis. But no Nat Adderley. Yes, it’s Curtis.

2:1 ‘Sister Sadie’ was a lady played by a guitarist with more chops than sense. Now, can I get downstairs and make a cup of tea and get beck before the next cut?

2:2 Didn’t quite make it. Heard ‘Billy boy’ as I came up the stairs and thought I was listening to Mr Ram C Lewis. Now I’m sitting down, I KNOW I’m listening to Mr Lewis. Well, this was a tune that Ahmad Jamal played a bit, but I’m sure it’s not him.

Thinking about it, I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s Gene Harris in there.

2:3 Starts of fairly unpromisingly but, before the end of the first minute, evolves into another of those kind of interesting, kind of over-involved, Blue Note hard bop numbers, relying for interest on the drummer, who is really nice. Must be Freddie Waits or someone like Henry Higgins. Freddie Hubbard’s always nice, too, when I’m in the mood for him. Now there’s supposed to be a tenor player. Yes, here he is, playing trombone, as if he’d no guts at all. Certainly not a great deal of trombone sound in there. Well, no piano, no tenor sax; what a disappointment.

2:4 Pretty quietly recorded track. Or maybe the pianist’s just making no impact. Here comes a trumpet player and, yes, it’s more audible. But the drummer’s more noticeable then the others on my computer. Ah, the tenor player speaks in plain language. Well, he sounds too much like Eric Alexander for my taste.

2:5 Lord, I know this tune well, but can’t think of the title. OK, this isn’t Ramsey Lewis, Junior Mance, Gene Harris, or Les McCann. I like his approach. He’s a bit insane and makes me think of Earl Hines, but this has too modern a sound for that. And he’s not quite off the wall enough. I wouldn’t put it past being someone else who played well into recent days like Jay McShann, who I still haven’t pursued enough to have a good feel for him. But he’s carried this tune well for almost six minutes now, most enthusiastically. So put me down for Jay.

2:6 Ah, an organist. Something I’ve not heard before. I don’t think this is a guy from the fifties-sixties; it’s a retro-soul-jazz band. But It’s not Organissimo J

Oh, is that Bubba Brooks? And Bobby Forrester? Bubba has LOTS of different sounds in his horn, and I’m not sure this is him. But I’m not sure this is NOT him, also.

Well, on to ‘Cold sweat’, for a taste of reality. And a quick cough and drag.

A lot of this was pretty nice; thanks Dan.

MG

On ‎04‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 5:02 PM, Mary6170 said:

I know one of the songs. Song 3 is by the Archie Shepp and Horace Parlan duo, from the Trouble in Mind album on the Steeplechase label. This song is When Things Go Wrong from that album.

Your Blindfold Test is a consistently mainstream, swinging one. I like it. I will keep listening and trying to guess who is playing.

Stone me! I've missed Archie Shepp. MUST put that right.

MG

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Went back and read through, now.  Just gotta say, man, Jim Sangry has some mother****in' EARS!!!!

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Yeah, ears so grand they could pick either Roscoe Mitchell or Al Cohn as the same player! And be wrong both ways! :excl:

Do we have Benny Waters in here someplace? I think not, but...

And/or - is that "Please Don't Talk..." cut an officially released on CD thing, or does its provenance lie elsewhere?

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5 hours ago, JSngry said:

Yeah, ears so grand they could pick either Roscoe Mitchell or Al Cohn as the same player! And be wrong both ways! :excl:

Do we have Benny Waters in here someplace? I think not, but...

And/or - is that "Please Don't Talk..." cut an officially released on CD thing, or does its provenance lie elsewhere?

No Waters and that cut was not issued on CD to my knowledge  but was a vinyl release.

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On February 16, 2017 at 3:05 PM, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

BFT155

I haven’t even looked at my e-mails for over 3 weeks, so I was glad I did today and finding a note about this BFT. I was so keen, I opened it up directly after dinner.

1:1 Bebop line by alto player with a somewhat unattractive sound. Pity about the sound because it means I have to listen to what he’s playing rather than the sound of his sax, which is always a bit of a chore for someone who doesn’t really like jazz all that much. Well, it sez it’s eight minutes and, after four, that’s kind of enough bebop for me to tolerate this evening. (I definitely feel crankier than I used to, nowadays.) Well, he’s sounding a mite better on his second solo and ‘tis pity he didn’t start off like that. I’d have been better disposed towards him, if he had. Oh well, that’s life, I guess.

1:2 I’m a good bit better disposed towards this geezer, whoever he is, despite it being more bebop, as he’s got a fairly nice sound, like there’s something actually IN that sax than air. A fair few Jug licks coming in, which help too. But I still don’t really like this enough to try to think who it might be, except he’s probably a newish player.

1:3 Oh, bloomin’ ‘eck Tucker! I’d like this to be Budd Johnson or Buddy Tate, but I think it’s probably neither. Oh hell, I want this like CRAZY! This is REAL music. Jeez!

1:4 Live. Oh, I think I know this tenor player and the tune. Definitely don’t know the recording. Another one I feel almost immediately that I should have. Mind you, I’m not looking forward to that horrid-sounding alto’s solo, unless he’s putting it on for the obligato. Mucho applause, well merited. So here’s the alto player and it ain’t Benny Carter or Lou Donaldson. It’s someone like Jackie McLean, whom I don’t like at all. But he WAS putting that weird sound on earlier. And he’s a lot more inventive than McLean. I could probably live with his playing, as it’s pretty entertaining.

I’m getting a strong feeling that these guys are putting this stuff on and it’s not their natural way of playing.

Well, we’re on the pianist now, and he’s kinda just playing the piano, know what I mean?

Now the drums, the drums. Fortunately, not followed by a bass solo.

Well, if I were there, I’d probably enjoy this more than I actually did.

1:5 Another long one. Oh, this sounds like Sonny Stitt. ‘Please don’t talk about me when I’m gone’, a tune that jazz musicians seem to have forgotten about. And it AIN’T Stitt. Nice sound, though.

Trombonist has a nice sound, too. Well, it’s really nice. And he played nice sensible stuff. On to the tenorman. Pop goes the weasel – someone’s gonna say it’s Fred Jackson J

So a guitar. And someone who sounds like one of the JATP perennials, shoved in there to make up the numbers and justify a high gate charge.

And now a trumpeter. Yes, SO much like a JATP job, this. We’ve obviously got Oscar to come. Well, just to prove it, it’s not Oscar. Still, I don’t suppose he had an absolute monopoly on JATP gigs. I wonder what they’d have sounded if Gene Harris HAD been in the band?

1:6 More live. ‘Broadway’. To be frank, I’m finding, on the third live cut, this is all sounding like what a former lady colleague used to call jazz wanking, not without justification, I feel. Really looking forward to 7 in a minute.

1:7 ‘Willow weep for me’ played REALLY nicely. And I think I might have this. Oh yes, as it goes along, I’m SURE I have it. I think it’s King Curtis. But no Nat Adderley. Yes, it’s Curtis.

2:1 ‘Sister Sadie’ was a lady played by a guitarist with more chops than sense. Now, can I get downstairs and make a cup of tea and get beck before the next cut?

2:2 Didn’t quite make it. Heard ‘Billy boy’ as I came up the stairs and thought I was listening to Mr Ram C Lewis. Now I’m sitting down, I KNOW I’m listening to Mr Lewis. Well, this was a tune that Ahmad Jamal played a bit, but I’m sure it’s not him.

Thinking about it, I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s Gene Harris in there.

2:3 Starts of fairly unpromisingly but, before the end of the first minute, evolves into another of those kind of interesting, kind of over-involved, Blue Note hard bop numbers, relying for interest on the drummer, who is really nice. Must be Freddie Waits or someone like Henry Higgins. Freddie Hubbard’s always nice, too, when I’m in the mood for him. Now there’s supposed to be a tenor player. Yes, here he is, playing trombone, as if he’d no guts at all. Certainly not a great deal of trombone sound in there. Well, no piano, no tenor sax; what a disappointment.

2:4 Pretty quietly recorded track. Or maybe the pianist’s just making no impact. Here comes a trumpet player and, yes, it’s more audible. But the drummer’s more noticeable then the others on my computer. Ah, the tenor player speaks in plain language. Well, he sounds too much like Eric Alexander for my taste.

2:5 Lord, I know this tune well, but can’t think of the title. OK, this isn’t Ramsey Lewis, Junior Mance, Gene Harris, or Les McCann. I like his approach. He’s a bit insane and makes me think of Earl Hines, but this has too modern a sound for that. And he’s not quite off the wall enough. I wouldn’t put it past being someone else who played well into recent days like Jay McShann, who I still haven’t pursued enough to have a good feel for him. But he’s carried this tune well for almost six minutes now, most enthusiastically. So put me down for Jay.

2:6 Ah, an organist. Something I’ve not heard before. I don’t think this is a guy from the fifties-sixties; it’s a retro-soul-jazz band. But It’s not Organissimo J

Oh, is that Bubba Brooks? And Bobby Forrester? Bubba has LOTS of different sounds in his horn, and I’m not sure this is him. But I’m not sure this is NOT him, also.

Well, on to ‘Cold sweat’, for a taste of reality. And a quick cough and drag.

A lot of this was pretty nice; thanks Dan.

MG

Stone me! I've missed Archie Shepp. MUST put that right.

MG

Well MG, Sister Sadie and the last tune were selected specifically with you in mind (and you most definitely have heard the final track).

Thanks for participating I knew there were tracks that would be too much like jazz for your taste.

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Up for any final thoughts or guesses.  I will post the reveal tomorrow.

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This may contain more stumpers than any BFT in recent memory.  I'll guess Hannibal for track 10.

 

Edited by randyhersom

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1 hour ago, randyhersom said:

This may contain more stumpers than any BFT in recent memory.  I'll guess Hannibal for track 10.

 

Not Hannibal.  I'll be posting answers soon though so the stumping will end.

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