Milestones

Mark Turner

17 posts in this topic

Any Mark Turner fans out there?  He seemed to be a hot young saxophonist not long ago, yet the years have slipped by and he's now 50+.  His activity has picked up a lot lately, especially with ECM releases--one of his own (Lathe of Heaven), a couple with Billy Hart, Stefano Bollani. He's also recorded quite a bit with Kurt Rosenwinkel. 

By no mean an innovator, he seems always worth hearing. He really knocked me out on the Tom Harrell record Trip.  The Billy Hart records are good too.  His playing is often called moody and cerebral.

I had not really heard Turner until less than a month ago, and now I find that he is somebody I need to check out extensively.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Milestones

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I am a big fan. I think you will find board members divided on Turner. Some of our more prominent members are bewildered (to put it nicely) as to why he is considered as influential as he is among younger saxophonists and regarded so highly by many fans. I have been a fan since my connect in the old J&R Music Store in Manhattan hipped me to his first Warner Brothers recording in 1995.

In the days when I seemed to have more time I even compiled and regularly updated his discography through 2012 which was published  here http://www.jazzdiscography.com/Artists/Turner/index.php.

Edited by relyles

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I would put him (at the very least) in the company of Joshua  Redman, Branford Marsalis, and Chris Potter.

Thanks for the discography.  There's a lot to explore.

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4 hours ago, Milestones said:

I would put him (at the very least) in the company of Joshua  Redman, Branford Marsalis, and Chris Potter.

I would agree, although Potter's been at it longer and, eventually, better.

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I'm going to see him in a couple of months in Billy Hart's quartet with Ethan Iverson & Ben Street. I'm optimistic.

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For those of you in Texas, Mr. Turner will be in San Antonio on Sunday afternoon, January 28th with the Billy Hart Quartet.

 

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I've begun to think that Billy Hart is among the under-sung GREAT jazz drummers.

 

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10 hours ago, Milestones said:

I've begun to think that Billy Hart is among the under-sung GREAT jazz drummers.

 

Agree 100%

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For me Turner is the more interesting player cf Potter, Marsalis and Redman.

 

His playing hints at Warne Marsh as an influence which in my book is never a bad thing. 

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22 hours ago, Milestones said:

I've begun to think that Billy Hart is among the under-sung GREAT jazz drummers.

 

13 hours ago, BFrank said:

Agree 100%

 

I agree too!  Billy Hart is a MASTER. 

I'm planning to see Hart's Quartet with Mark Turner next month at the Jazz Standard in NYC.

You can also count me as a fan of Mark Turner.

 

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Yes, I've heard about the Warne March influence, though I confess that I have very little familiarity with Marsh.

 

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3 hours ago, HutchFan said:

I agree too!  Billy Hart is a MASTER. 

Seconded .... 

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4 hours ago, HutchFan said:

 

 

I agree too!  Billy Hart is a MASTER. 

This is a thread running through Rafi Zabor's novel The Bear Comes Home.  (honest)  

Edited by medjuck

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23 hours ago, Milestones said:

Yes, I've heard about the Warne March influence, though I confess that I have very little familiarity with Marsh.

 

The Marsh influence is there in Turner, but I find it rather external -- a matter of Warne-like bits and pieces used in an almost decorative manner, not an attempt to grasp and extend/work personal variations on the way Warne thought, above all on his exceptional freedom of movement in so many respects. For someone who heard that in Warne and put it to work in his own way, go to Plugged Nickel Wayne Shorter, for one. And Ted Brown, too --less than Warne, yes, but a genuine inventor of  much integrity. But I did find some early Turner enjoyable. 

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I've seen Turner several times in different formats and he never really excited me. But the last couple of times I felt that I was starting to understand where he's coming from.

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On 1/13/2018 at 11:00 AM, medjuck said:

This is a thread running through Rafi Zabor's novel The Bear Comes Home.  (honest)  

Yes, that and that bears actually have a bone there. The descriptions of the bear's playing always put me in mind of Arthur Blythe.

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