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Mark Stryker

White Leaders on Blue Note

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Who are the white musicians who recorded as leaders for Blue Note in its pre-1980s revival era? I can think of Art Hodes, Sheila Jordan, Jutta Hipp, Gil Melle, J.R. Monterose. Any others I'm forgetting?

Edited by Mark Stryker

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Tal Farlow.

Sal Salvador.

Urbie Green.

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Urbie Green, Sal Salvador & Lou Mecca.

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George Wallington.

The 3 sessions on "Best of the West" (not sure who the leaders were).

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Thanks guys. Appreciate it. If any others come to mind, please chime in.

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Seems like Bill Evans and Jim Hall were on the label, or somehow had a few things reissued on Blue Note. 

Edited by Milestones

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25 minutes ago, Milestones said:

Seems like Bill Evans and Jim Hall were on the label, or somehow had a few things reissued on Blue Note. 

That was a CD reissue of a UA album.

Kenny Cox in the Liberty era (and don't sleep on those two albums).

Barbara Carroll, Robbie Krieger (of the Doors), and Dom Minasi in the bleak 70's UA era.

Edited by felser

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None of those originated with Blue Note.  The Legge was a Vogue session, I assume the Sims was.  The Sinatra is Capitol recordings that got released on CD on the Blue Note label.

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So what is the point?  That white musicians contributed little to the "Blue Note sound"?

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This is the first I've heard of Kenny Cox being white? Not that it matters?

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3 hours ago, felser said:

That was a CD reissue of a UA album.

Kenny Cox in the Liberty era (and don't sleep on those two albums).

Barbara Carroll, Robbie Krieger (of the Doors), and Dom Minasi in the bleak 70's UA era.

To the best of my recollection, Kenny Cox was African American.

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45 minutes ago, JSngry said:

This is the first I've heard of Kenny Cox being white? Not that it matters?

In the same vein:

Was Wade Legge white? Those who claim so - please look at his BN cover. ;)

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Isn't the whole thing moot?  So many people are bi-racial, or some kind of mix in differing percentages.  People achieve different looks.  At one time quite a few thought Jarrett was African-American, but after his early period it's clear he's about as white as can be.

How different was it in the 1960s, other than perception?

 

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Gang:

Kenn Cox was black. All of the members of the Contemporary Jazz Quintet in Detroit were black, except drummer Danny Spencer.

 

Edited by Mark Stryker

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Well, I wasn't there but from all I heard about the US of the 1950s and 1960s, it did make a difference for the artists (and for most people actually) whether they were perceived as Black, White, etc. And this suffices to make the question valid. Don't really know about the US today... of course, things have changed, but I still think that most Americans would understand something like this:

"If you look at the cover of the first Kenny Cox album you see four black guys and one white guy - Drummer Danny Spencer. From the way Spencer is standing in the picture, it is easy to mistake him for the leader and this probably lead felser to the wrong conclusion of Cox being white."

Regarding white people contributing to the Blue Note Sound: no this cannot be the question because there were white sidemen like Pepper Adams who contributed a lot...

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43 minutes ago, Mark Stryker said:

Gang:

Kenn Cox was black. All of the members of the Contemporary Jazz Quintet in Detroit were black, except drummer Danny Spencer.

 

My bad, thanks.

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Jazz provides evidence of how willing to stereotype most of are.  I'm sure back in the day people would think that Pepper Adams was black because of his gruff, hard-driving sound.  Does Jimmy Knepper "sound" white? 

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Does Rudy Van Gelder sound white!?!?!?!?!?!

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Not that it has much to do with the thread topic, but I've always found Kenny Cox' playing and compositions to have a melancholy streak far away from the stereotypical Blue Note sound. Maybe it could even be perceived as sounding "white"? Anyway, I love those two Blue Notes.

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No offense to the cult of RVG, but he more captured the sound than created it.

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I think him and Lion created the sound. The musicians created the music.

Remember, these are records we're talking about. At least one degre3e of separation from the music by definition, often more than one.

Does Elvin Campbell sound black?

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