Chalupa

Cecil Taylor RIP

82 posts in this topic

Shatz wrote: "....Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “This Nearly Was Mine” on his 1960 album The World of Cecil Taylor—one of the last standards he would ever perform...."

In 1962 (Copenhagen and Stockholm) he was still playing What's New? and Flamingo, the latter of Earl Bostic (but not written by) renown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe that's why he writes "one of the last"? ;) - for a career that went on for five more decades, I think that's a sound way of putting it. After all, up to that point, Taylor had recorded plenty of standards ... and "This Nearly Was Mine" is a standout!

Regarding the apocryphal stories and episodes, I wouldn't mind Shatz mentioning them, but the insistence on them being true is indeed problematic. But obviously, the grown-up reader will still harbour his/her doubts ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was listening to Roscoe Mitchell's Nessa recording, Celebrating Fred Anderson. yesterday and remembered a story I'd read (can't recall where) about Mr. Mitchell sitting in with Coltrane's group at a Chicago club in 1965 or '66, playing a solo that left many folks with dropped jaws, packing up his horn and leaving the club without saying a word. I have no way of knowing if that story is true, if it's a myth, or a combination of the two. And I don't care which it is. To me, it's just a great story. Sometimes myths are better than "facts".
The truth is in the music.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, paul secor said:

I was listening to Roscoe Mitchell's Nessa recording, Celebrating Fred Anderson. yesterday and remembered a story I'd read (can't recall where) about Mr. Mitchell sitting in with Coltrane's group at a Chicago club in 1965 or '66, playing a solo that left many folks with dropped jaws, packing up his horn and leaving the club without saying a word. I have no way of knowing if that story is true, if it's a myth, or a combination of the two. And I don't care which it is. To me, it's just a great story. Sometimes myths are better than "facts".
The truth is in the music.

Previous thread

...and...

http://www.organissimo.org/forum/index.php?/topic/39766-roscoe-mitchell-brings-jazz-history-to-mills/

Re: broken wrists...

This from an old Cecil discography by Mike Hames.  It's part of the notes for an entry dated March-April 1964, the Bennington College performance and panel.

"Cecil Taylor seems to have played very few gigs in 1964 - partly because he was attacked in May, 1964 and had his wrist broken."

Sunny Murray's references to "gangsters" was usually about his own recordings.  He used that term to describe the people at BYG.  I know of no instance in which he used it to describe people in connection with Cecil's recordings.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, erhodes said:

Huh...

Murray did talk about it here.

Great interview. And on origins of Ayler tunes in Swedish music and French folk song...!

 

I don’t get out enough...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.