mikeweil

Which jazz book are you reading right now?

231 posts in this topic

I think the book came out in the mid 1990s. He was signing copies in the late 1990s at a Festival when I met him.

Fortunately, I did buy several wonderful signed photos from Ray at his home.

The James Harrod book looks really tempting. Pricey though at £50 for a paperback.

Edited by sidewinder

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19 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

an excellent choice ! I remember I bought this book in the late seventies. Hampton Hawes was really a great piano player and as the book shows, a great story teller also. 

I´ve also read an interview with Hampton Hawes done by drummer Art Taylor, which was later published in Taylor´s book "Notes and Tones". It´s a very angry and frustrated Hampton Hawes there…...

It’s definitely a great read ! I worked in Gardena/Compton here in California for years , so when a buddy of mine found this old business card floating around on social media , he sent it my way . I did some research and found out about an amazing musician+human being . Local legend in my eyes ~

Will definitely check out Notes and Tones , anger and frustration are two emotions I can vibe with currently - lost my cousin/best friend to a rare health issue this January . We’re both the same age (30) , and now all of humanity has this nasty virus to deal with . . Been planning a move to NYC to pursue some musical endeavors , but now everyone there is stuck in a seriously scary situation . Visited for a few weeks three years in a row to spend time with friends & family/check out potential schools , but now I’m not sure if the places I wanted to try for will be holding auditions at the end of the year , or even have programs up and running again anytime soon . Gahhhh !!!!
 

Thank you for the recommendation !

16 hours ago, BillF said:

One of the classics of jazz autobiography - along with Art Pepper's Straight Life.

Will check this one out as well . Thank you !

7D88E8F3-1D7E-4EAC-9FFC-73503255948C.jpeg

Edited by luhem

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luhem:

In Raise Up Off Me, Hamp employs the pseudonym "Wally Shade in reference to the bass player playing with him at Sherry’s in Hollywood in the summer of 1958 that was involved in the narcotics sting that got Hamp arrested for possession. Looking up old newspaper clippings, I came across one notice in the Pasadena Independent Star-News, dated July 20, 1958, where it lists Hampton Hawes and Ralph Peña playing duo. That's just one sole listing; it could've been any number of bassists.

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On 4/8/2020 at 1:30 AM, Phenomena said:

 

I'd bet on the bassist being Hersh Hamel, who worked with Hawes and IIRC was notorious on that scene for ratting out guys to the drug cops. I believe he was responsible for one of Art Pepper's busts and one of Chet Baker's too.

OTOH, I would be surprised it were Pena. Never thought him as a junkie or as associating with junkies. Fine player too FWIW, who came to a sad early end. He was injured in an auto accident in Mexico City and local doctors botched his treatment.

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Revisiting some chapters in this book for an upcoming Night Lights show. Excellent work, if you haven’t already read it and are interested in the topic. Gioia spoke with quite a few musicians who are now gone.

51mwbbJ%2BpkL._SX340_BO1,204,203,200_.jp

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9 hours ago, ghost of miles said:

Revisiting some chapters in this book for an upcoming Night Lights show. Excellent work, if you haven’t already read it and are interested in the topic. Gioia spoke with quite a few musicians who are now gone.

51mwbbJ%2BpkL._SX340_BO1,204,203,200_.jp

Yes a good one. Been on my bookshelf for many years alongside this:

511h5Ivf4CL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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On 3.5.2020 at 6:05 PM, gmonahan said:

Navarro.jpg

This is one of the greatests jazz bios I´ve read. Really good with all the tunes and Analysis of Fats´ solos, and much About his live that I didn´t know. I love everything Fats did, he is a true master, his solos are so great, so perfect, he never played a bad note…..

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Revisiting

51MQ9%2BGZxEL._SX344_BO1,204,203,200_.jp

In parallel with

613qXJF8lhL.jpg

Edited by EKE BBB

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2 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

This is one of the greatests jazz bios I´ve read. Really good with all the tunes and Analysis of Fats´ solos, and much About his live that I didn´t know. I love everything Fats did, he is a true master, his solos are so great, so perfect, he never played a bad note…..

Hee heee .. the musician speaks ... :D

I bought the book when it came out (though Scarecrow Press usually frightens you off price-wise) but I found the musical analysis sections really heavy stuff for a non-musician and not easy to digest ... So this is one book where I have skipped quite a bit so far, partly because so far I just never got around to REALLY sit down for lengthier times to take in the recordings with the book in hand, following up all the writings note for note (though OTOH that Fats Navarro CD in my car is one of my favorite musics there, not least of all because of the perfect blend with Tadd Dameron's writing).

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9 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

This is one of the greatests jazz bios I´ve read. Really good with all the tunes and Analysis of Fats´ solos, and much About his live that I didn´t know. I love everything Fats did, he is a true master, his solos are so great, so perfect, he never played a bad note…..

I've liked it so far Gheorghe. It's deeply researched, contrasts various accounts in tracing his life, and I like the fact that the musical analysis of each period is separated from the relevant biographical chapters. And, of course, one look at the photo on my profile will tell you what I think of Fats Navarro!!

 

 

 

gregmo

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I just started reading the novel - Tiger Rag - by Nicholas Christopher.

This book combines the early jazz history surrounding trumpet player Buddy Bolden and his long lost recording cylinder, and the search for that cylinder  over 100 years later.

Thus far I am finding this novel extremely interesting.

I forgot to include this in my previous post.51I12gg5HwL._AC_UY218_.jpg

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10 hours ago, Big Beat Steve said:

OTOH that Fats Navarro CD in my car is one of my favorite musics there, not least of all because of the perfect blend with Tadd Dameron's writing).

Do you mean that CD?

FwfoxbuxYMkEGMPVEgrAbyMsnnS_4BhCq6_OPKSm

I also have it and it's absolutely brilliant.

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10 hours ago, Peter Friedman said:

I just started reading the novel - Tiger Rag - by Nicholas Christopher.

This book combines the early jazz history surrounding trumpet player Buddy Bolden and his long lost recording cylinder, and the search for that cylinder  over 100 years later.

Thus far I am finding this novel extremely interesting.

I forgot to include this in my previous post.51I12gg5HwL._AC_UY218_.jpg

I read that last winter and found it very interesting too. It's all fictional, of course, but there are enough actual facts and characters woven into the plot to make it a story that COULD have happened that way.

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10 hours ago, Bluesnik said:

Do you mean that CD?

FwfoxbuxYMkEGMPVEgrAbyMsnnS_4BhCq6_OPKSm

I also have it and it's absolutely brilliant.

Your pic doesn not show up here but it would be a coincidence if it was the same. It's just a compilation reissue on the cheapie Italian Giants of Jazz label mostly made up of recordings featuring Navarro for Blue Note, Savoy, Prestige and Dial (all of which - and more - I already have on vinyl). The kind of compilation you buy cheaply at record sales for "minor uses" such as in-car listening. ;) Great music anyway.

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13 hours ago, gmonahan said:

I've liked it so far Gheorghe. It's deeply researched, contrasts various accounts in tracing his life, and I like the fact that the musical analysis of each period is separated from the relevant biographical chapters. And, of course, one look at the photo on my profile will tell you what I think of Fats Navarro!!

 

 

 

gregmo

One Thing I really "learned" from Fats Navarro is the way he goes from the second A section of a song into the Bridge, so that´s this transitions from the A-Part into the Bridge were he really Plays. Before I noticed this, I was not pleased with my own playing, too many "holes" between the sections of the song structure, so when I started to Play more , Fats´ style helped me to make it Sound more "Pretty", not so stiff collared. 

I noticed the same Thing when I listened to Al Haig. When he first played on 52nd streed in 45, he still sounded "stiff", but listen to how he Plays a few years later, I think Fats was an influence for lot of musicians who Play other Instruments......

21 hours ago, Big Beat Steve said:

Hee heee .. the musician speaks ... :D

I bought the book when it came out (though Scarecrow Press usually frightens you off price-wise) but I found the musical analysis sections really heavy stuff for a non-musician and not easy to digest ... So this is one book where I have skipped quite a bit so far, partly because so far I just never got around to REALLY sit down for lengthier times to take in the recordings with the book in hand, following up all the writings note for note (though OTOH that Fats Navarro CD in my car is one of my favorite musics there, not least of all because of the perfect blend with Tadd Dameron's writing).

yes you are Right. But what helped me a lot was that I allready knew Fats Music and could "hum" quite a few of his solos . There´s Always a lot of Melody in them, they are sheer Beauty, and so they are easy to remember, at least for me, and so when i read the Analysis I already knew the tune, the solo.....

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Scarecrow Press is appropriately named. Don't know about the crows, but their prices certainly scare me! :o

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10 hours ago, Big Beat Steve said:

The kind of compilation you buy cheaply at record sales for "minor uses" such as in-car listening.

But that's a very laudable purpose. I meant that one

V6SJ9o5-Ul_buZlper3MtMwGJ77W7Gf_q6a2Qclv

It's a compilation from BN following in the footsteps of Mosaic featuring the complete BN & Capitol output of the pair. Hope the image is visible now.

Edited by Bluesnik

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8 hours ago, BillF said:

Scarecrow Press is appropriately named. Don't know about the crows, but their prices certainly scare me! :o

They sure ain't cheap! I had the Fats Navarro bio on my amazon wish list for a while before a more affordable copy finally showed up.

 

 

 

gregmo

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13 hours ago, gmonahan said:

They sure ain't cheap! I had the Fats Navarro bio on my amazon wish list for a while before a more affordable copy finally showed up.

 

 

 

gregmo

hi Greg, you also might like to read the great Tadd Dameron bio. Since they had such a close collaboration and played 39 weeks at the Royal Roost in 1948 and before that at the Onyx I think, it´s really a very fine Team. I think Tadd really got inspired to write for Fats, many of his tunes really are Fats´ favourites, like "Eb Bop", "Symphonette" , "Jahbeero" , "Tadd Walk", and so on......

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41jKtMM3LJL._SX333_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I am finding this one much better than his Ellington book. 

 

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2 hours ago, John Tapscott said:

I am finding this one much better than his Ellington book. 

I agree. No comparison.  

I was so disappointed with Teachout's Ellington bio. ... I had high expectations, since I'd already read his Pops book -- and I think that one is very fine.

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On 5/7/2020 at 0:12 AM, Gheorghe said:

hi Greg, you also might like to read the great Tadd Dameron bio. Since they had such a close collaboration and played 39 weeks at the Royal Roost in 1948 and before that at the Onyx I think, it´s really a very fine Team. I think Tadd really got inspired to write for Fats, many of his tunes really are Fats´ favourites, like "Eb Bop", "Symphonette" , "Jahbeero" , "Tadd Walk", and so on......

Thanks for the recommendation! I'll check it out!

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