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WD45

"great little session" says Dusty Groove

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I've noticed an odd thing in some of Dusty Groove's descriptions -- the overuse of the weirdly diminutive phrase "great little session."

Why do they do that?

Edited by WD45

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Probably for the same reason that Scott Yanow is overly fond of describing a recorded performance as "heated" or "quite heated" in his (printed) All Music Guide to Jazz. :D

(I do know what he means but is he THAT afraid of (also) using the term "hot" (for fear of "wrong" or old-ish connotations?) ;)

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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This is a great little thread. Let’s hope it doesn’t get heated :D

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Great little way to build expectations and tamp them down at the same time. 

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"It's one big steaming pile of... work, but we still got to sell it somehow to unsuspecting rubes."

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How about all those pieces that have "knotty" melodies or patterns.

 

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23 minutes ago, Milestones said:

How about all those pieces that have "knotty" melodies or patterns.

 

I must admit I've never read THAT one before. :huh:

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It's knotty. And dangerous. And some experiments. Look out.

 

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Dusty has all kinds of routine descriptors that I believe are intended as code to manage expectations. 

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‘Great and rare early work from British/European jazz legend [ insert name here ].’

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Dunny McBlakkenruud!

17 hours ago, Teasing the Korean said:

Dusty has all kinds of routine descriptors that I believe are intended as code to manage expectations. 

I don't know about intent, but that is indeed the de facto result.

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18 hours ago, Teasing the Korean said:

Dusty has all kinds of routine descriptors that I believe are intended as code to manage expectations. 

Does anyone go back to the descriptor after receiving and hearing the recording (other than for condition grading when it seems off) to determine if they met or fell short of expectations generated?  

IMHO this is just part and parcel of their goofy yet endearing way of describing their wares. Everything they have is something worthy of purchasing for some reason, by dint of their having acquired it to re-sell.

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As with their vinyl grading, I've developed a bullshit detector/translator. It's not yet perfected, but it's getting there. If they pimp the rarity, hey. If they pimp the chornology, that's a different hey. If they pimp the people on board, hey again. Etc. You gotta weigh the various pimpages and then proceed accordingly, becuase, sometimes I am more interested in the rarity than the actual quality of the perfomance. Sometimes. Like that Italian movie star's song cycle that had Steve Lacy on a few cuts. I know that was one for the collecting much more than the enjoyment, and although not totally without some enjoyability, it's ultimately one of those "glad I heard it once, but the next time it comes off the shelf will be if it ever comes up in conversation with somebody who's curious about it and doesn't know about Dusty Groove" things.

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5 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

Or they don't really understand music or language.

Or they do understand the business.   Count me in on the "code to manage expectations" theory.

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4 hours ago, Dan Gould said:

Does anyone go back to the descriptor after receiving and hearing the recording (other than for condition grading when it seems off) to determine if they met or fell short of expectations generated?  

YES, I picked up years ago a lousy Serge Gainsbourg soundtrack, and when I went back to read the description, I realized that they were trying to subtly warn me.  But at the time, I was just excited to get another Serge Gainsbourg album so I didn't pay close enough attention. 

Since then, I have paid more attention to how they creatively straddle the line between hype and candid assessments. 

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They do give warnings, yes!

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OK can someone point to a current listing with this code and deconstruct it?

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Art Blakey — Hold On, I'm Coming ... LP 7.99

A soulful little record (nothing special apart from being "soulful") from Art Blakey – and very different than his Blue Note sessions (going for either market share or avant cred, in this case the former)! The album's got a tight soul jazz groove – shorter numbers, fuller backings, and an overall sound that's almost more like Cadet Records at the time (forget about blowing, this one is aimed at radio and jukebox and jazz-casual pop listeners). Backings are handled by Melba Liston or Tom McIntosh, and tracks are shorter than usual – but still filled with firey work by from the players – who include Freddie Hubbard and Chuck Mangione on trumpet, Tom McIntosh and Garnett Brown on trombone, Gary Bartz on alto, Frank Mitchell on tenor, Grant Green on guitar, John Hicks on piano, and Malcolm Bass on organ (you'll want this one as a discography filler, not for the compelling gutsy improvisations). A number of tracks have a conga drum groove – very unusual for the average Blakey album (we're warning you!) – and the tracks are a mix of soul jazz originals and pop covers, like "Secret Agent Man", "Sakeena", "Slowly But Surely", "Monday, Monday", and "Hold On, I'm Coming" (don't say we didn't warn you!).  © 1996-2018, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Now, if you don't know about Art Blakey, hey, they'll take your money. But if you do, they're letting you know that it's...different, and then telling you how - and you should know what you're getting (into) - but by all means, get it?!?!?!?

Turning Point

An incredible, and oft-overlooked album from the great Benny Golson – and one of the few early albums that really point the way to his huge run of work for decades to come! The style here is a bit looser, and more open than some of Golson's previous albums – less of a focus on arrangements, and more on the spontaneous interplay between his tenor and the crack rhythm section – which features Wynton Kelly on piano, Paul Chambers on bass, and Jimmy Cobb on drums – a dream lineup who really make the record sparkle. But the real star of the show is Golson – who's hitting this raspy, soulful tone he never had before – much freer of soul jazz formalities, and with a modern edge that's wonderful – as you'll hear on titles that include "Alone Together", "Turning Point", "Stella By Starlight", and "Dear Kathy".  © 1996-2018, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Free

Without a doubt, Benny Golson is one of the most underrated tenorists of his generation – a player with a tone and conception that's always tremendous – but which comes across especially well on this early 60s session for Argo Records! As you might guess from the title, things aren't as tightly structured as on some of Benny's more arranged albums of the period – and he opens up wonderfully in a small group setting – playing in a beautifully confident tone, but with a slightly raspy edge – cutting, changing, and swinging perfectly in lines that are masterfully crafted, yet full of raw emotion. The group's a thoughtful quartet, and includes Tommy Flanagan on piano, Ron Carter on bass, and Art Taylor on drums – and tracks that inlcude "Sock Cha", "Shades Of Stein", "Just By Myself", and "Just In Time"

Benny's loosening up, blowing more, fully engaged, and has a kickass band on hand. If that sounds good to you, buy with confidence.

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Or, on the latter two, they could have simply written, "this is a tenor + rhythm date so Benny concentrates on his blowing. Buy with confidence if you love Benny the improviser at least as much as Benny the composer/arranger."

 

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Yeah, they could have. But that's not their style. They're pretty saavy/shrewd about their "brand", their blurbs are all of a piece, have a distinctive style. I mean, here's a thread about them, right?

I mean, there's used record stores everywhere, and there's websites everywhere. But when you say the name "Dusty Groove", you know that it's a whole "experience". I'd say they know exactly what they're doing.

I think that their use of the word "little" is meant to convey that the record in question is not, by intent or by result, a "must have all-time greatest record of all time". It's jsut a "______ little" session/record/lunch/whatever. And "soulful" usually indicates that whatever else it might or might not be, it's got an element of non-hungup-sqaure-straightness to at least some degree. It'll groove at some level, even if it is a highly compromised in every other way session, it's not going to be totally square.

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