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Andre Previn (1929 - 2019)

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Andre Previn (1929 - 2019) .... R.I.P ....

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I saw him conduct Walton's 2nd Symphony at Carnegie Hall; great performance. I enjoyed reading his autobiography, "No Minor Chords", also.

RIP, Mr. Previn.

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A regular and welcome sight over here on TV during the 70s during his LSO stint. It will seem odd that he is no longer with us. RIP.

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Saw him conduct at Tanglewood several years ago.

RIP.

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Interesting life, nothing wasted as far as I can tell. RIP.

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I always liked the My Fair Lady trio album on Contemporary. RIP.

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RIP, Andre. Thanks for the wonderful music. 

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i've been trying to figure out via the internet which came first: jazz, classical or film music.  But looks like he was a prodigy in all of them fro the beginning.  (I first noticed him as the pianist on Shelly Mann's My Fair Lady.) 

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It's curious he never did a country music album.  The man did everything else, which presents a problem for record stores and guys like me.  I've got Previn LPs in three shelf locations for jazz, easy listening, and film music -- and in another room with the classical albums.  And then there's the pop albums with Dory Previn.     

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I took note of his non-jazz activites only in passing. My first exposure to him came via his mid-40s recordings for Eddie Laguna's Sunset label reissued on Black Lion in the 70s and I was suitably impressed after having bought this LP new at the time. My Fair Lady came quite a bit later (sometime after after the Jim Flora-illustrated ^_^ Rogers-Previn Collaboration on RCA and Previn/Freeman's Double Play on Contemporary). I know some will shrug many of these recordings off as too much technique (and not enough heartfelt "keyboard fumbling" or so ... ;)) but anyway ... IMO he had chops. And looking at the jazz corner of his Discogs entries now I realize there are a couple more I'll have to check out when the occasion presents itself.

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Is it possible that he once was with Ella Fitzgerald on TV, kind of hosted a show with Ella, with music, with interviews etc.  ?

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Posted (edited)

8 hours ago, medjuck said:

i've been trying to figure out via the internet which came first: jazz, classical or film music.  But looks like he was a prodigy in all of them fro the beginning.  (I first noticed him as the pianist on Shelly Mann's My Fair Lady.) 

Simplified and generalized timeline:  Film music was first.  There was some overlap between his jazz work and his film work.  "Classical" - conducting and composing - came later.  Previn still occasionally played jazz along the way during the classical phase.  

Edited by Teasing the Korean

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Love his 'Collaboration' with Shorty Rogers. One of the best West Coast recording...

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7 hours ago, Bill Nelson said:

It's curious he never did a country music album.  

Dunno, but he did some Mooged out, spaced out funk on Rollerball!

 

 

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3 hours ago, Teasing the Korean said:

Simplified and generalized timeline:  Film music was first.  There was some overlap between his jazz work and his film work. 

Most specifically perhaps The Subterraneans?

I'm also a fan of his Duet album with Doris Day.

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5 hours ago, brownie said:

Love his 'Collaboration' with Shorty Rogers. One of the best West Coast recording...

I agree, a very good recording.

 Previn had a diverse and truly amazing musical career.

Though not related to the music, it was interesting to see that over the course of his long life he had five wives. 

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...and supported one to get ready for Woody Allen...

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9 hours ago, ghost of miles said:

Most specifically perhaps The Subterraneans?

Stylistically, sure.  I was referring more to an overlap of the timelines between his jazz and film music career.

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On 2/28/2019 at 2:44 PM, sgcim said:

I saw him conduct Walton's 2nd Symphony at Carnegie Hall; great performance. I enjoyed reading his autobiography, "No Minor Chords", also.

Wasn't aware that he had written an autobiography. Thanks for the heads-up on that, sgcim. 

He certainly led an interesting life!  Was there anyone who moved so fluidly and convincingly between different musical worlds?!?!?

 

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I have three of his albums, with Mundell Lowe joining him on all three.  While I got to see Lowe perform on three occasions, I never got to see Previn perform.  I need to pick up the album he did with Russ Freeman.  Thank you for the music, Mr. Previn, and rest in peace.

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Posted (edited)

Thinking about it, Previn made the first jazz and the first classical records I owned. When I was about ten my parents gave me an EP of him playing Fats Waller and about the same time I bought a cassette of him conducting Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Seventh Symphony. Thanks Andre! I daresay he got a lot of people into music beyond pop, he was so unpretentious and approachable.

Are many Americans familiar with his brief comedy career?

 

Edited by crisp

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Of all "classical" musicians trying themselves at jazz he was the best, IMO - well, if you can label him "classical", that is. His swing was natural, and that is the most important part of it. He was an all-round musician, period.

R.I.P.

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